MediterraneanGrocery Wholesalers in Philadelphia, PA

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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Philadelphia

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Philadelphia, PA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Philadelphia's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Philadelphia. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Philadelphia, PA. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Philadelphia, PA

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Philadelphia,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Philadelphia, PA

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Philadelphia, PA

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Philadelphia, PA

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Philadelphia, PA, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Philadelphia, PA

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Philadelphia, PA

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Philadelphia, PA.

 Greek Grocery Store Philadelphia, PA

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Philadelphia, PA

Latest News in Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia resident identified as first probable monkeypox case in Pa.

Pennsylvania’s first probable case of monkeypox has been reported in Philadelphia, city health officials said Thursday afternoon. Further testing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to confirm the case is pending.As of Thursday, there have been 19 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the U.S. Worldwide, there are more than 500 cases, and there has been one death associated with this outbreak.“The threat to Philadelphians from monkeypox is extremely low,” said Health Department Acute Communicable ...

Pennsylvania’s first probable case of monkeypox has been reported in Philadelphia, city health officials said Thursday afternoon. Further testing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to confirm the case is pending.

As of Thursday, there have been 19 confirmed cases of monkeypox in the U.S. Worldwide, there are more than 500 cases, and there has been one death associated with this outbreak.

“The threat to Philadelphians from monkeypox is extremely low,” said Health Department Acute Communicable Disease Program Manager Dana Perella in a statement. “Monkeypox is much less contagious than COVID-19 and is containable particularly when prompt care is sought for symptoms.”

‘This is a pox virus we know a lot about.’ Infectious disease experts in the region say monkeypox is familiar, preventable

The monkeypox outbreak may feel familiar to COVID-19, but infectious disease experts say we have the tools and knowledge to stop the spread.

3 days ago

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The virus that causes the disease — which is related to smallpox — is transmitted through close contact with broken skin, or through the eyes, nose, and mouth. Monkeypox is not a sexually transmitted disease, but it can spread through intimate contact.

Local infectious disease experts say the new outbreak is noteworthy because of the number of cases across multiple continents at once over a relatively short time period, however, the disease is less contagious than COVID-19, since it does not spread through the air, and vaccines and therapeutics are available to treat the disease after exposure.

The outbreak is unlikely to become widespread, said epidemiologist Michael LeVasseur of Drexel University.

“It has kind of a long latent period. So it’s not surprising that we’re still finding cases,” he said. “I think that there’s still plenty of time for it to be contained, especially with contact tracing and making sure that any close contacts that they’ve had are alerted and are put on watch.”

Symptoms typically arise about 12 days after exposure, but can present any time between four and 21 days. The virus can cause fever, headache, muscle aches, back pain, and swollen lymph nodes. The most distinguishable symptom is a blistering rash.

To protect the resident’s privacy, the Philadelphia health department won’t confirm any information about them. The infected resident is currently working with the health department to identify any contacts that may have been exposed, who will be contacted directly.

Philadelphia’s health department “strongly recommends that anyone who is experiencing symptoms of an unexplained rash on their face, palms, arms, legs, genitals, or perianal region that may be accompanied by flu-like illness should contact their regular healthcare provider as soon as possible.”

LeVasseur said doing so will make a difference in stopping the spread.

“If you have sores, go to the doctor and make sure that you keep in mind any intimate partners that you may have over the course of the next couple of weeks in the event that we have to do contact tracing to prevent further spread,” he said. “This isn’t about stigmatizing anyone. This is about making sure that everyone is taken care of and can be watched to make sure that they don’t have substantial disease and to prevent further transmission.”

Monkeypox Case Reported in Philadelphia, 1st Confirmed for Pa.

A case of monkeypox was confirmed in a Philadelphia resident Thursday, making it the first in all of Pennsylvania, city health officials said.Nationally, 10 states have now confirmed cases of the disease, which is spread by person-to-person contact, according to the Centers for Disease Control.Initial symptoms include:Within...

A case of monkeypox was confirmed in a Philadelphia resident Thursday, making it the first in all of Pennsylvania, city health officials said.

Nationally, 10 states have now confirmed cases of the disease, which is spread by person-to-person contact, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Initial symptoms include:

Within one to three days of developing a fever, an infected person then "develops a rash, often beginning on the face then spreading to other parts of the body." The infection usually lasts two to four weeks.

"In humans, the symptoms of monkeypox are similar to but milder than the symptoms of smallpox. Monkeypox begins with fever, headache, muscle aches, and exhaustion," the CDC says on its website. "The main difference between symptoms of smallpox and monkeypox is that monkeypox causes lymph nodes to swell (lymphadenopathy) while smallpox does not."

The disease has been spreading across the globe in an unusual pattern, according to the CDC, which has led the agency to begin a heightened monitoring of its spread.

"CDC is closely tracking cases of monkeypox that have been recently reported in several countries that don’t normally have monkeypox activity, including the United States," the federal agency says on its webpage dedicated to the disease.

In Africa, the disease "has been shown" to cause death in as many as one in 10 patients, the CDC says.

“The threat to Philadelphians from monkeypox is extremely low,” Philadelphia Health Department Acute Communicable Disease Program Manager Dana Perella said in a statement Thursday. “Monkeypox is much less contagious than COVID-19 and is containable particularly when prompt care is sought for symptoms. Vaccine to prevent or lessen the severity of illness is available through the CDC for high-risk contacts of persons infected with monkeypox, as is antiviral treatment for patients with monkeypox. I believe that residents and visitors should feel safe to do all the fun things Philadelphia has to offer, with the proper precautions.”

The current global outbreak was first confirmed in a British citizen on May 6, the city said in its statement. Since then, cases have been confirmed in 29 other countries.

"The Health Department strongly recommends that anyone who is experiencing symptoms of an unexplained rash on their face, palms, arms, legs, genitals, or perianal region that may be accompanied by flu-like illness should contact their regular healthcare provider as soon as possible," the city said in its statement.

There were no details released about the Philadelphia infection, other than noting that the person is a city resident.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health did not respond to a request for more information about the case.

An outdated parking rule in Pa. law threatens the safest kind of bike lanes

Pennsylvania law on street parking is decades old. It limits protected bike lanes.Bike lanes separated from traffic by parked vehicles on several busy state routes in Philadelphia have drawn flocks of cyclists, slowed cars, and reduced collisions, a study of the lanes shows.They also could be among the last of their kind in the city unless the state Senate acts to clarify the definition of a curb.Parking-separated bike lanes have historically been barred on state-owned roads because Pennsylvania law requires parked vehic...

Pennsylvania law on street parking is decades old. It limits protected bike lanes.

Bike lanes separated from traffic by parked vehicles on several busy state routes in Philadelphia have drawn flocks of cyclists, slowed cars, and reduced collisions, a study of the lanes shows.

They also could be among the last of their kind in the city unless the state Senate acts to clarify the definition of a curb.

Parking-separated bike lanes have historically been barred on state-owned roads because Pennsylvania law requires parked vehicles to be within 12 inches of the curb, or the edge of the pavement.

The lanes, also referred to as “parking-protected,” are dedicated tracks for cyclists with a row of parked vehicles to shield them from being hit by cars and trucks. A marked 5-foot wide lane abuts the curb and drivers park on the other side of a safety buffer — putting them up to 8 feet from the curb, a violation of the Pennsylvania law.

This arrangement is considered among the safest arrangements for bicycles and is widely used in the U.S. and in Europe.

Legislation to allow cars to park within a foot of the buffer of a parking-protected bike lane has not moved in the state Senate, though the House unanimously passed it in March of last year. The measure enjoys support from PennDot, safety advocates, and local governments around the state who want the option as part of a strategy to make streets safer for all users.

“We are hopeful that the Senate will carry HB140 over the finish line,” said Sarah Clark Stuart, executive director of the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. “The entire commonwealth will benefit from adding this type of safety measure to the traffic engineering toolbox.”

Philadelphia has parking-separated bike lanes on sections of 10 state routes, including Market Street, JFK Boulevard and the Chestnut Street Bridge. They have operated since 2018 as pilot projects under agreements with PennDot.

If the legislature doesn’t change the law, existing pilots would continue, but it could be difficult to add more without authorization for permanent parking-separated bike lanes, PennDot spokeswoman Alexis Campbell said.

“The data collected in these pilots is incredibly useful and will help us shape projects moving forward,” Campbell said. “We will continue to work with the city on a case-by-case basis if there are additional pilot locations that can inform the future use of parking protected bike lanes.”

PennDot backs the legislation to “provide more flexibility in how we can accommodate all roadway users,” she said.

Parking-protected bike lanes have a row of street parking between vehicle traffic and the bike lane, instead of at the curb.

A transportation consultant’s traffic study conducted last year found benefits to the lanes on Market Street and JFK Boulevard.

Kittleson & Associates found crashes decreased by nearly 20%, though fewer people were driving during the pandemic, which may have been a factor. Average car speeds declined 6%, but the city did not see evidence of more congestion. The number of bikes using the routes jumped 96%, a possible result of a perception they were safer for cyclists.

So far, the bike-lane bill has not drawn any concerted opposition. The Senate Transportation Committee held a hearing on the House bill in April, but the panel’s chairman, Sen. Wayne Langerholc Jr. (R., Cambria), has not scheduled a vote to send it to the floor for consideration.

The Senate reconvenes Monday and has 14 voting sessions scheduled before June 30, followed by more than two months of summer recess. Three voting days are scheduled for September, six in October and one in November.

The legislature’s two-year session ends Dec. 31; any laws not passed by then must be reintroduced.

While the city can build parking-protected bike lanes on its own streets, many of the most dangerous roads are state routes with high traffic volumes and average speeds. About 360 miles of Philadelphia’s 2,575 miles of roads are owned by PennDot.

Changes in parking or driving lanes on local streets need City Council approval.

In Philadelphia, accommodating bicycle travel has sometimes been politically fraught as critics of bike lanes point to a crimp in space for vehicle parking and business loading zones, or slower traffic flow.

A pair of senators during April’s hearing said parking-protected bike lanes could cause problems in some cases.

Sen. Mario Scavello (R.,Monroe) said many Main Street businesses in smaller towns take deliveries through the front door. He was concerned that could lead to trucks impinging on a bike lane or “stacking” in traffic lanes to unload.

“I’m for the concept … [but] I think that small businesses will have issues,” Scavello said.

And Sen. Camera Bartolotta (R., Beaver) raised the issues of electric bicycles and e-scooters using bike lanes, possibly endangering people with disabilities who will have to cross them after exiting parked vehicles.

“They’re not used to looking for an oncoming e-scooter that’s going 25 m.p.h., that might mow them down as they’re getting to the sidewalk,” she said, though e-scooters are not legal in the state.

Advocates say that loading zones can be incorporated into the design of streets with parking-separated bike lanes and that they would not be appropriate in all areas. PennDot would publish engineering standards and local planners would decide whether and where to build the lanes.

“I believe it is important to acknowledge that the reason they are currently illegal has nothing to do with them and their function within the public right of way,” said Nicholas Ross, chief traffic engineer in Pittsburgh’s transportation department. It’s a matter of “obsolete” legal language that has an unintended consequence, he said.

Pennsylvania's first case of monkeypox reported in Philadelphia resident, officials say

PHILADELPHIA - The first case of monkeypox has been reported in Pennsylvania, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday.The agency did not specify where in Pennsylvania the virus was detected, but the Philadelphia Department of Public Health announced Thursday that a probable case was identified as a Philadelphia resident.Philadelphia health officials say th...

PHILADELPHIA - The first case of monkeypox has been reported in Pennsylvania, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday.

The agency did not specify where in Pennsylvania the virus was detected, but the Philadelphia Department of Public Health announced Thursday that a probable case was identified as a Philadelphia resident.

Philadelphia health officials say the data was based on preliminary testing at the Pennsylvania Department of Health’s Bureau of Laboratories. They called the threat to Philadelphians ‘extremely low.’

Pennsylvania joins California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, Utah, Virginia and Washington as the U.S. states with at least a single confirmed case.

Monkeypox? What is it?

According to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, monkeypox is caused by a virus that is in the same genus of viruses that causes smallpox.

Monkeypox, according to the CDC, was first discovered in 1958, following two outbreaks of a pox-like disease in colonies of monkeys that were kept for research.

The first human case of the disease was recorded in a country now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1970, during a period of intensified effort to eliminate smallpox. Since then, the disease has been reported in people in several central and western African countries. Cases have also been reported in the U.S., as well as a number of Asian, Middle Eastern, and European countries.

What are the symptoms of monkeypox?

According to CDC's website, it takes usually seven to 14 days from the time of infection for a person to start feeling symptoms of the disease, but the incubation period can also range from five to 21 days.

The illness, according to the CDC, begins with:

CDC officials say within one to three days after the appearance of fever, the person infected will develop a rash, often beginning on the face then spreading to other parts of the body. The rash will eventually dry up and fall off.

According to the World Health Organization, symptoms of monkeypox typically last two to four weeks.

Can people die from monkeypox?

According to WHO, the fatality rate for monkeypox varies between zero and 11% in the general population. The rate is higher among young children.

How does it spread?

CDC officials say monkeypox is spread when a person comes into contact with the virus from an animal, human, or materials contaminated with the virus.

"The virus enters the body through broken skin (even if not visible), respiratory tract, or the mucous membranes (eyes, nose, or mouth)," a portion of the website reads.

CDC's website states that human-to-human transmission of monkeypox "is thought to occur primarily through large respiratory droplets," but other human-to-human transmission include "direct contact with body fluids or lesion material, and indirect contact with lesion material, such as through contaminated clothing or linens."

How did it get to the U.S.?

According to Massachusetts health officials, the state's monkeypox case involved an adult man who recently traveled to Canada. Since then, monkeypox has also been detected in ten U.S. states, including Pennsylvania.

In Portugal, officials with the country's General Directorate for Health said they are investigating 15 suspected cases of monkeypox that were all identified in May, in the area around Lisbon.

Great Britain, meanwhile, had previously reported three cases of monkeypox, two involving people who lived in the same household and the third involving someone who had traveled to Nigeria.

Have we seen monkeypox cases in the U.S. before?

According to the CDC, the first-ever monkeypox case in the U.S. happened in 2003, when 47 confirmed and probable cases were reported from six states: Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

"All people infected with monkeypox in this outbreak became ill after having contact with pet prairie dogs. The pets were infected after being housed near imported small mammals from Ghana," read a portion of the website.

According to officials, investigators later determined that an animal shipment from Ghana to Texas in April 2003 introduced monkeypox into the U.S.

Following the 2003 outbreak, two human monkeypox cases were reported in 2021. In both cases, the person infected came to the U.S. from Nigeria.

CDC officials say monkeypox does not occur naturally in the U.S.

What can I do to help prevent getting monkeypox?

CDC officials have the following advice for people in order to prevent a monkeypox infection. They include:

Are there treatments for monkeypox?

Officials with the CDC say there is currently no proven, safe treatment for monkeypox.

Is there a vaccine for monkeypox?

Yes.

According to the CDC, a vaccine called Jynneos, also known by the names Imvamune or Imvanex, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for preventing monkeypox.

According to the website of the Military Health System, Jynneos was approved by the FDA in September 2019. In a statement issued by Bavarian Nordic, the vaccine is based on a virus that is incapable of replicating inside a human body, but still able to trigger an immune response.

Officials with WHO stated, however, that the vaccine is not widely available.

Need Something to Do Near Philly This Memorial Day Weekend? Here Are 8 Ideas

Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start to summer -- but we understand if you haven't made your plans yet. So we’ve compiled a list of things to do if you’re still looking for fun.LUCY THE ELEPHANT - MARGATE CITY, NJWHEN: May 27 - 30, 2022WHERE: 9200 Atlantic Ave., Margate City, NJ 08402The 14- year-old landmark Lucy the Elephant reopens for guided tours on Friday, May 27 just in time for the holiday weekend. The park surrounding the attraction is...

Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start to summer -- but we understand if you haven't made your plans yet. So we’ve compiled a list of things to do if you’re still looking for fun.

LUCY THE ELEPHANT - MARGATE CITY, NJ

WHEN: May 27 - 30, 2022

WHERE: 9200 Atlantic Ave., Margate City, NJ 08402

The 14- year-old landmark Lucy the Elephant reopens for guided tours on Friday, May 27 just in time for the holiday weekend. The park surrounding the attraction is closed due to an ongoing restoration project; however, you can still go into Lucy and the gift shop. Complimentary admission for the guided tour is provided to members of the US military with ID.

For more information, visit the website.

DORNEY PARK AND WILDWATER KINGDOM - ALLENTOWN, PA

Breaking news and the stories that matter to your neighborhood.

WHEN: May 27 - 30, 2022

WHERE: 4000 Dorney Park Rd., Allentown, PA 18104

The amusement park and accompanying water park is opening its doors Friday at 11 a.m. for some fun in the sun in the Lehigh Valley. If you are trying to stay cool, Wildwater Kingdom has nearly 20 different water attractions with varying thrill levels so the entire family can enjoy. If you prefer to stay dry, the park has 45 other rides and attractions to experience this Memorial Day.

To reserve your tickets, visit the website.

THE PHILLY POPS' MEMORIAL SALUTE PRESENTED BY COMCAST NBCUNIVERSAL AND WELCOME AMERICA - PHILADELPHIA, PA

WHEN: May 27, 2022

WHERE: 5201 Parkside Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19131

To honor and celebrate those who have served, the Philly POPS will be performing several patriotic songs, anthems and classics for all ages at this free event at the Mann Center. The show begins at 7 p.m. featuring conductor Byron Stripling, violinist Jennifer Orchard, and guest vocalist Sydney McSweeney. Doors open at 6 p.m. As part of the Mann’s Summer Picnic Series, this event allows and encourages picnics at the outdoor concert experience.

Individuals can reserve tickets for free using code ‘MEMORIAL’ here.

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND AT AMERICAN REVOLUTION MUSEUM SPONSORED BY COMCAST NBCUNIVERSAL - PHILADELPHIA, PA

WHEN: May 27 - 30, 2022

WHERE: 101 S. 3rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19106

The museum has a full weekend of festivities planned online and in-person. Events include gallery tours, historical recreations and a theatrical performance about Joseph Plumb Martin, a teenage soldier In George Washington's Continental Army who wrote one of the best-known Revolutionary War memoirs. Veterans, military, and Blue Star families receive free admission courtesy of Comcast NBCUniversal.

Reserve tickets here.

CELEBRATE MEMORIAL DAY AT SESAME PLACE - LANGHORNE, PA

WHEN: May 28 - 29, 2022

WHERE: 100 Sesame Rd., Langhorne, PA 19047

Elmo and his crew have a full weekend of festivities for kids and parents to celebrate the holiday weekend. Families can enjoy a meet and greet with a very patriotic Elmo and his friends Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday evening, the park will play music by the characters and put on a fireworks display that can been seen from across the park.

Reserve tickets here.

GLASSBORO MEMORIAL DAY PARADE - GLASSBORO, NJ

WHEN: May 30, 2022

WHERE: University Boulevard & Lehigh Rd., Glassboro, NJ 08028

Families can enjoy marching bands, mummers, firetrucks and much more at the Glassboro Memorial Day Parade. This annual parade will honor local fallen soldiers with a military dedication during a ceremony at the War Memorial in Town Square. Admission to the event is free.

For more information, visit the website.

WILMINGTON'S 2022 MEMORIAL DAY PARADE - WILMINGTON, DE

WHEN: May 30, 2022

WHERE: Delaware Avenue & Broom St., Wilmington, DE 19802

The Memorial Day Committee of Wilmington will be hosting their annual Memorial Day parade starting at 6 p.m. on Monday. The parade will end at the Civil War Monument located at N. Broom Street, where a memorial service will be held honoring those who have served and given their lives. This yearly tradition has been held since 1868 and will bring together the community for an event of remembrance once again this year.

To read more on the event, visit their website.

BREAKFAST WITH THE GIRAFFES AT ELMWOOD PARK ZOO - NORRISTOWN, PA

WHEN: May 28 - 29, 2022

WHERE: 1661 Harding Blvd., Norristown, PA 19401

Entertain and feed the kids at the same time with Breakfast with the Giraffes at the Elmwood Park Zoo. The event tickets come complete with breakfast for the entire family, including your choice of beverages and an exclusive time to feed the zoo's giraffes. For the parents, you can add-on bottomless Mimosas or Bloody Marys, too. Enjoy the most important meal of the day at 8:30 a.m. or 10 a.m. before exploring the rest of the zoo.

You can read details here.

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