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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Louisville

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Louisville, KY. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Louisville's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Louisville. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Louisville, KY. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Louisville, KY

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Louisville,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Louisville, KY

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Louisville, KY

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Louisville, KY

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Louisville, KY, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Louisville, KY

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Louisville, KY

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Louisville, KY.

 Greek Grocery Store Louisville, KY

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Louisville, KY

Latest News in Louisville, KY

How Kentucky's largest cemetery got into the honey business

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Cave Hill Cemetery is the final resting place for legendary Kentuckians like Colonel Harland Sanders and Muhammad Ali, but over the last few years, the Louisville landmark has broken into a new buzzing market; beekeeping.The cemetery’s head arborist of over 15 years and now head beekeeper, Roger Martin, explained that around 2016, leadership at Cave Hill backed the idea of caring for its own colony of bees. Before this, an independent beekeeper named Rodolfo Bernal kept bees on the property, and still doe...

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Cave Hill Cemetery is the final resting place for legendary Kentuckians like Colonel Harland Sanders and Muhammad Ali, but over the last few years, the Louisville landmark has broken into a new buzzing market; beekeeping.

The cemetery’s head arborist of over 15 years and now head beekeeper, Roger Martin, explained that around 2016, leadership at Cave Hill backed the idea of caring for its own colony of bees. Before this, an independent beekeeper named Rodolfo Bernal kept bees on the property, and still does today.

In 2017, the first jars of Cave Hill honey were sold. Since then, the cemetery’s bees have produced thousands of pounds of raw honey—even gaining statewide recognition by winning first place in the 2021 Kentucky State Fair.

“I absolutely never thought I would be a beekeeper,” Martin said.

Martin, who’s an arborist by trade, said this wasn’t where he thought his career would end up, but he’s not complaining. In his years as an arborist, Martin recalls many times when they would have to call in beekeepers when trees had to be cut down.

“It only makes sense that after almost 30 years of doing tree work that I would’ve evolved into a bee and tree guy,” Martin said.

These days, Martin and his team tend to the bees year-round. They also educate others about their program, attend beekeeping conferences and sell honey at festivals and farmer’s markets.

From start to finish, the entire process of producing and bottling honey happens on site. Their work mostly happens inside a converted gardener’s shed near the cemetery’s main entrance.

It was late August when Spectrum News visited the cemetery, right in the middle of a honey harvest. There are gallons of already processed honey ready to be bottled. The processing room is warm and there are dehumidifiers on.

Martin explained there’s a certain moisture level the product has to be in order to be considered authentic honey. Being warm also makes the honey more viscous and easy to pour.

The bees produce honey inside wooden frames, sealed by a “cap.” The caps are cut off and melted down into beeswax. Honey-filled frames are then placed in a machine with an extractor, which spins the frames at a high rate of speed. Honey is then released and filtered, ending up in five-gallon buckets.

After sitting overnight, it’s ready to be bottled.

“And that is the freshest bottle of Cave Hill Honey in existence,” Martin said, holding a bottle of honey.

It’s not unheard of for cemeteries to keep bees. Martin said there’s a growing trend of more locations starting up programs.

“There are bees here, more than we will probably ever know, so why not take the benefit of the bees pollinating everything in our gardens?” Martin said.

Bottles of Cave Hill Cemetery honey are sold on site and sometimes at farmer’s markets or festivals. Bottles are sold by the pound and half-pound.

Can Louisville become the next health tech startup hub? These leaders think it has an advantage.

As the health care scene rapidly changes with evolving technology, Louisville may be able to lead the charge, according to local health tech leaders.The Health Enterprises Network, the health care arm of Greater Louisville Inc., Louisville’s chamber of commerce, hosted a forum discussing the health care technology ecosystem Wednesday morning.Panelists included Tammy York Day, president and CEO of CEOc, previously known as the Louisville Healthcare CEO Council; Grace Simrall, chief of civic innovation and technology for Lo...

As the health care scene rapidly changes with evolving technology, Louisville may be able to lead the charge, according to local health tech leaders.

The Health Enterprises Network, the health care arm of Greater Louisville Inc., Louisville’s chamber of commerce, hosted a forum discussing the health care technology ecosystem Wednesday morning.

Panelists included Tammy York Day, president and CEO of CEOc, previously known as the Louisville Healthcare CEO Council; Grace Simrall, chief of civic innovation and technology for Louisville Metro Government; and Rob Cohen, CEO of Bamboo Health.

The panel, hosted by Logan Gatti, executive director of HEN, discussed the issues of workforce and utilizing health data to improve health outcomes and the industry as a whole.

Can digital health care impact patient outcomes?

Cohen said since the Affordable Care Act, many conversations have focused on turning health care from a reactive system to a proactive system. As opposed to treating patients only when they’re sick, a new model would work on sustaining health.

“Digital health is really about allowing that to happen, as I said, by creating those efficiencies, by extending that capacity,” Cohen said. “It's about how to surround the riskiest people on down to, quite frankly, the healthiest people with the right amount of resources to care to make sure they're staying ahead of their health and to make sure that they are remaining healthy.”

York Day added that part of the outcome conversation has to include equity.

“When we look at digital health as the tool, the way that that we really can drive those health outcomes and health equity by applying it appropriately and effectively, we're at that time that leveraging it the right way is how we live because we can't have better health outcomes as a society without addressing health equity,” York Day said.

How will digitalized health care impact the work force?

York Day said one of the key issues impacting health care CEOs is workforce challenges. She said in the future, 28% of jobs were at risk of being lost due to automation. Similarly, there will soon be more people over the age of 65 than under the age of 18.

York Day said this can be combatted by the health care ecosystem identifying what skills or certifications are needed for staff as soon as they enter, so training resources can be made available.

“We want the technology to be able to ease the burden on workforce, and we have a real opportunity,” she said.

The health care workforce needs to grow its skillset in order to adapt to new technologies, Simrall said.

“Those individuals need digital skills, but they will need to have a new skills that might not even exist yet,” Simrall said. “So how do we together, have an industry work with training providers and education providers to figure out how to nimbly adjust and provide those skills to this expanding workforce?”

From the health tech hiring side, Cohen said there is a war on talent. He said salaries have skyrocketed for people with particular skills, such as engineering and web developing. Cohen said the ability to attract and retain this talent is difficult when competing with remote-flexible jobs.

He said Louisville would benefit from developing from within — meaning the area’s schools and companies can work on growing the right talent.

What can Louisville do to make itself a leader in digital health care?

Cohen said a way to kickstart a startup community in a city is to have large, established company already in the city. He credited Seattle's startup boom to the presence of Microsoft, which led its employees to spin off new companies in the city. He said Louisville has an advantage by having Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM).

Cohen said Louisville will also have to attract other companies to the city to spur more innovation, from “tax incentives to highlighting the talent that's already here that they can take advantage of [and] highlighting what a great place to live it is, to get companies to relocate.”

But Simrall was quick to differentiate Louisville from a startup hub like Silicon Valley, because it contains domain experts who understand health care from all angles. She said Louisville can similarly position itself for innovation by working with universities to create an entrepreneurial system.

“Instead of waiting for our big unicorn, let's create our future,” Simrall said. “We don't have to wait for anyone to do that. So I think that's why the forming of the coalition is such an important step in realizing that model of innovation for our city.”

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WKU Baseball Announces Newcomers for 2023 Season

Steve Roberts/WKU Athletics BOWLING GREEN, Ky. — WKU Baseball head coach Marc Rardin and his staff announce the signing of 20 newcomers for the 2023 baseball season. These student-athletes will join the 18 players maintained from the following season to compose the 2023 squad.The 2023 roster additions include: Camden Ross, Bryson Arnette, Jack Bennett, Evan Jones, Lukas Farris, Kirk Liebert, Brayden Johnson, Cam Tulla...

Steve Roberts/WKU Athletics

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. — WKU Baseball head coach Marc Rardin and his staff announce the signing of 20 newcomers for the 2023 baseball season. These student-athletes will join the 18 players maintained from the following season to compose the 2023 squad.

The 2023 roster additions include: Camden Ross, Bryson Arnette, Jack Bennett, Evan Jones, Lukas Farris, Kirk Liebert, Brayden Johnson, Cam Tullar, CJ Weins, Nic Schutte, Jake Gothrup, Elliott Rossell, Beau Coffman, Cal Higgins, Aaron Lewis, Dawson Hall, Cole Eigenhuis, Garrett Brunstetter, Bryson Rigney and Mason Burns.

WKU Baseball assistant coaches Rob Fournier and Dillon Napoleon provided some insight on each student-athlete.

Camden Ross Freshman | Broomfield, Co. | Broomfield HS | C Fournier on Ross: "Camden comes to us as the Colorado High School Player of the Year. We will look to him as an impact player in our lineup, who has a tremendous future ahead."

Bryson Arnette Junior | Hodgenville, Ky. | John A. Logan CC | INF Fournier on Arnette: "We look forward to immediate leadership on and off the field from Bryson. A very experienced JUCO player who will be a spark for our offense."

Jack Bennett Freshman | Paducah, Ky. | McCracken County HS | RHP/OF Fournier on Bennett: "We are very excited to coach an exciting two-way player with a very bright future ahead."

Evan Jones Freshman | Normal, Ind. | Normal University HS | RHP/OF Fournier on Jones: "A talented two-way player, who will be exciting to watch develop."

Lukas Farris Freshman | Acworth, Ga. | North Cobb Christian HS | OF Fournier on Farris: "Another talented incoming physical freshman - who has real power potential."

Kirk Liebert Grad. | Owensboro, Ky. | Kentucky | C Fournier on Liebert: "The staff is excited to coach a true all-around baseball player and talented prospect. He will impact us in so many ways on both sides of the ball."

Senior | Longview, Texas | Prairie View A&M | OF Fournier on Johnson: "He comes to us as a 1st-Team All-SWAC outfielder with lots of talent and experience. A guy we are all excited to see compete."

Cam Tullar Grad. | Brighton, Mich. | Mississippi State | LHP Napoleon on Tullar: "Cam Tullar supplies us with tremendous SEC experience and a trip to Omaha. Can't wait to see what he can do for the Hilltoppers."

CJ Weins Senior | Chicago, Ill. | South Carolina | RHP Napoleon on Weins: "Another pitcher with high level SEC experience. A true work horse and competitor that leads by example."

Nic Schutte Freshman | Louisville, Ky. | Louisville Male HS | RHP Napoleon on Schutte: "A very athletic right-handed pitcher with a tremendous future ahead. An absolute joy to be around."

Jake Gothrup Freshman | Lafayette, Ind. | William Henry Harrison HS | RHP Napoleon on Gothrup: "An Indiana native who is a tremendous athlete. Real power arm potential with a bright future."

Elliott Rossell Freshman | Zionsville, Ind. | Zionsville Community HS | RHP Napoleon on Rossell: "He has tremendous potential to be an impact pitcher in the future. With strength, he has a chance to very special."

Beau Coffman Junior | Louisville, Ky. | Wabash Valley CC | RHP Napoleon on Coffman: "A Kentucky native and tremendous competitor who was a leader on the Wabash Valley College pitching staff. We have big expectations to help bolster the Hilltopper pitching staff."

Cal Higgins Sophomore | Kearney, Neb. | Iowa Western CC | LHP Napoleon on Higgins: "Another experienced JUCO arm from a great program in Iowa Western. He will be counted on for some quality innings this season."

Aaron Lewis Freshman | Kearney, Mo. | Liberty North HS | RHP Napoleon on Lewis: "He is an explosive incoming freshman. Right-handed pitcher with huge potential that possess electric stuff. He should immediately impact the Hilltopper pitching staff."

Dawson Hall Freshman | Bowling Green, Ky. | Bowling Green HS | RHP Napoleon on Hall: "We are excited to see the Bowling Green native. He has been very impressive so far. We are really excited to see how he develops this spring."

Cole Eigenhuis Grad. | Benicia, Calif. | Sacramento City College | RHP Napoleon on Eigenhuis: "He is such a valuable piece to the culture of WKU - both on and off the field. He will be an intimidating force when he steps on the mound. He should provide immediate impact to our pitching staff."

Garrett Brunstetter Freshman | Louisville, Ky. | Trinity HS | LHP Napoleon on Brunstetter: "A Louisville native, who will provide a spark for the pitching staff. Left-handed pitcher with a bright future and stability on the mound."

Bryson Rigney Freshman | Hurricane, W. Va. | Hurricane HS | RHP Napoleon on Rigney: "A West Virginia native who supplies us with a different look on the mound and will be used in many important roles."

Mason Burns Junior | Bloomington, Ill. | Illinois State | RHP Napoleon on Burns: "An Illinois native that comes to WKU from Illinois State. He will be an arm to help bolster the Hilltopper pitching staff."

Head coach Marc Rardin on the 2023 WKU Baseball roster: "With the start of my new era at WKU Baseball and the start of the fall semester, I thought the team has really come into this with a lot of energy and willingness for everything to be new and different. There is something to be said when a entire team can be open-minded and excited for everything to be new and different. To be willing to try and do things completely different. Whether that is drills, terminology, team beliefs, or whatever it may be. They have been opened-minded and willing for all of it. It has made it enjoyable and exciting for me and my staff as well. We have a good core group coming back from last year that has proven some decent numbers and potential. There has been some very good transfers thrown into the roster mix from the NCAA portal and a small freshman group that is athletic and capable for competition in different areas of the field," said Rardin. "There is always a learning curve and different type of nerves with the unknown and the new – and that's just not for the student-athletes, but also for the entire coaching staff. The over-communicating has been huge. Over communicating drills and expectations is what is needed. That is how we do everything in the facility and on the field. The word "process" is a huge word, and on that I think is sometimes overly used by coaches. Same goes with "culture". It is overused as well, but in WKU Baseball terms, those two words and the meaning of both is never bigger than it is now. We are building a new culture from the ground up and it takes a daily process to see improvements. Patients from me and my staff, from each student-athlete and our fans and supporters is a huge need from everyone. People are going to see an energy and a solid base of culture that everyone will be able to see, hear and even feel when around here in the future. My staff will incorporate these things through a daily player development plan that we brought with us. It is what we believe works and it will here as well."

WKU Baseball will have their first official team practice on Friday, September 23rd with a team scrimmage following at 6:30 p.m. The following weekend, WKU Baseball will welcome back WKU Baseball Alumni with a barbecue while they will host a scrimmage against Murray State at 1 p.m. on Saturday, October 1st. On Saturday, Oct. 8th, WKU Baseball will travel to Lipscomb for a scrimmage starting at noon. That next Wednesday, Oct. 12, WKU Baseball will face international competition going head-to-head with Team Ontario in their final scrimmage of the fall starting at 6 p.m.

How to follow WKU Baseball: For complete information on WKU Hilltopper Baseball, visit WKUSports.com or follow the program via social media @WKU_Baseball on Twitter and @WKUBaseball Instagram or like the WKU Baseball Facebook page.

Inspired by his daughters, Louisville man starts Cope's Hope Equine Assisted Services

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Eric Wright started Cope’s Hope Equine Assisted Services in 2021, hoping it would have a positive impact on other Louisville area families, just like it did for his family.What You Need To Know Wright and his wife, Debbi, adopted their oldest daughter, Ella, from Ukraine. She was diagnosed with cerebral palsy when she was little. Wright said people told them she would never walk. Now, at 19-years-old, she is defying those odds.“Not only does she walk, but just recentl...

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Eric Wright started Cope’s Hope Equine Assisted Services in 2021, hoping it would have a positive impact on other Louisville area families, just like it did for his family.

What You Need To Know

Wright and his wife, Debbi, adopted their oldest daughter, Ella, from Ukraine. She was diagnosed with cerebral palsy when she was little. Wright said people told them she would never walk. Now, at 19-years-old, she is defying those odds.

“Not only does she walk, but just recently she rode a mule on the rim of the Grand Canyon. People never would have thought that would have been possible,” said Wright.

Wright said equine assisted therapy helped her strengthen her core and allowed her to walk.

“It’s been a major part of our life,” said Wright.

Not long after adopting Ella, they found out they were expecting a child. Their other daughter, Elsie, was diagnosed with Angelman syndrome, a rare neurogenetic disorder.

“We immediately said horse equine therapy is going to be a big part of it,” said Wright.

He said, just like it did for Ella, equine therapy helped Elsie improve core strength and walk.

“She just loves horses. That is probably her biggest motivator, is just being around the horses,” said Wright.

When the pandemic hit, there weren’t as many opportunities to get his girls around horses. That is until he bought a farm on the outskirts of Louisville from his uncle. It was actually Wright’s grandfather who purchased the land in 1964. Multiple family members have lived there since.

“This is the legacy of my grandfather, really. He always hoped people would have some place to go,” said Wright.

He knew this would be the perfect place to start equine assisted services. He appropriately named it Cope’s Hope Equine Assisted Services in honor of his grandfather, Arthur Coaplen.

This new venture actually has a lot in common with what he’s been doing for 30 years at the University of Louisville, where he works as a student success coach in the College of Education and Human Development.

“The work I do at the University of Louisville and the work I do at Cope’s Hope when I am doing my private practice work, it goes hand-in-hand. It’s about helping people.”

He wants all kids who come here to learn essential coping skills. Horses help him teach them that.

“If you’re stressed out, they’re going to feel that you’re stressed out. If you’re in a good mood, they are going to feel that. Their energy and response to you is typically about how you feel. We do a lot of grounding therapy. If you are calm and can take a deep breath, the horse is going to be calm,” said Wright.

Wright recently renovated the farmhouse, which he hopes to rent out soon to caregivers who need a little retreat from everyday life.

While Cope’s Hope is in its early stages, he hopes it will continue to provide hope and healing to Louisville families for generations to come.

Jefferson, Fayette schools deliver hope by donating furniture to eastern Kentucky school

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Ken Biggs was taking his second delivery to flood victims in eastern Kentucky on Tuesday.On his first trip, he delivered supplies donated by a church in Louisville. But this time, it involved Kentucky’s two largest school districts.What You Need To Know “Really, when they say there’s no words, there really is no words,” Biggs said. “I seen houses just moved off of foundations, cars turned upside down.”This time the Mister P’s Expre...

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Ken Biggs was taking his second delivery to flood victims in eastern Kentucky on Tuesday.

On his first trip, he delivered supplies donated by a church in Louisville. But this time, it involved Kentucky’s two largest school districts.

What You Need To Know

“Really, when they say there’s no words, there really is no words,” Biggs said. “I seen houses just moved off of foundations, cars turned upside down.”

This time the Mister P’s Express driver was taking donated school furniture from the state’s two largest school districts, Jefferson County Public Schools and Fayette County Public Schools, to Hindman Elementary School.

The Knott County school lost almost everything to floodwaters. JCPS and FCPS hope the donation will help get the school building ready for students’ return.

“The teachers are ready to go back to school. The kids are ready to go back to school but these buildings are not ready to have students in them in eastern Kentucky,” said Mark Hebert, JCPS’s communications manager. “They’ve been flooded out and so you have to have everything else to go with it. You have to have the infrastructure, the electricity and you’ve got to have furniture to put in the classrooms for the teachers and for the students and for the administrators.”

The dozens of donated items include bookcases, cafeteria tables and desks.

“We’re doing our little bit our share to make this a little bit better place and to provide this furniture for these students so that they can get back in their classroom,” Hebert added.

Mister P’s Express donated this truck to pick up the joint donation and deliver it to eastern Kentucky.

For Biggs, being part of the collaboration gives his job a new meaning.

“I’m just a regular guy but I think that’s what it takes, just regular people doing things working together and I’m really proud of my company to be a part of that,” said Biggs.

They are pulling together to deliver hope to those experiencing a hard time.

Knott County Schools students are scheduled to return to school on Sept. 19.

Crews will work to restore schools at night after school resumes until campuses are completely restored.

WellCare of Kentucky and Kentucky Homeplace Partner to Distribute Gas Cards to Medicaid Members

More than 500 WellCare Medicaid members eligible for assistanceLOUISVILLE, Ky., Sept. 8, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Over the past few years, many medically underserved Kentuckians have delayed seeking care to help manage chronic conditions or to make preventive medical appointments. First, COVID-19 restrictions kept people from making appointments. Now, a steep rise in gas prices has made getting to appointments even more difficult.To alleviate the financial strain of high gas prices and to encourage people to make and keep im...

More than 500 WellCare Medicaid members eligible for assistance

LOUISVILLE, Ky., Sept. 8, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Over the past few years, many medically underserved Kentuckians have delayed seeking care to help manage chronic conditions or to make preventive medical appointments. First, COVID-19 restrictions kept people from making appointments. Now, a steep rise in gas prices has made getting to appointments even more difficult.

To alleviate the financial strain of high gas prices and to encourage people to make and keep important appointments, WellCare of Kentucky and Kentucky Homeplace (KHP) have partnered to distribute gas cards offered at no cost to current WellCare Medicaid members. KHP, a program of the University of Kentucky's Center of Excellence in Rural Health (UK CERH), is coordinating the distribution in its 32-county service area in eastern Kentucky.

"We understand that many individuals have fallen behind on preventive care during the pandemic and as a result of the high cost of gas," said Dr. Frances Feltner, director of the UK CERH and principal investigator of KHP. "This program is going to help a lot of people get back on track."

The project is supported by a $15,000 donation from WellCare.

"Lack of transportation is often a barrier to care for our members, especially those who live in more rural areas," said Corey Ewing, plan president and CEO of WellCare. "We don't want the inability to fill their tanks to keep them from making and keeping what in some cases can be live-saving appointments."

KHP community health workers will identify clients in their 32-county service area of eastern Kentucky who have fallen behind on preventive care, and who are WellCare Medicaid members, to connect them with this opportunity.

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About WellCare Kentucky

WellCare of Kentucky provides government-sponsored managed care services to families, children, seniors, and individuals with complex needs primarily through Medicaid, Medicare Advantage, and Medicare Prescription Drug Plans across the state. WellCare is a wholly subsidiary of Centene Corporation, a leading healthcare enterprise committed to helping people live healthier lives. For more information, please visit wellcare.com/kentucky.

About Kentucky Homeplace

Residents of rural Kentucky have unusually high levels of certain diseases. These include cancer, heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and diabetes. Lifestyle choices, environmental factors, inadequate health insurance and general lack of understanding of the healthcare system are often cited as contributing to this condition. Kentucky Homeplace was created in 1994 by the University of Kentucky Center of Excellence in Rural Health to help address these issues. Based in Hazard, Ky., Kentucky Homeplace's 32-county community health worker initiative has linked tens of thousands of rural Kentuckians with medical, social and environmental services they otherwise might have gone without. For more information, visit kyruralhealth.org.

About the University of Kentucky Center of Excellence in Rural Health

The University of Kentucky Center of Excellence in Rural Health was established by state legislation in 1990 to address health disparities in rural Kentucky and the unique challenges faced by our communities. The mission was and still is today to improve the health and wellbeing of rural Kentuckians. For more than three decades, the Center has partnered with communities, providers, students and individuals to provide health professions education, health policy research, health care service and community engagement toward reaching this mission. For more information, visit kyruralhealth.org.

SOURCE WellCare of Kentucky

Louisville, Ky., codifies open data portal

Louisville, Kentucky’s Metro Council unanimously voted to codify the city’s open data practice and portal into law more than a decade after it was established via executive order. Grace Simrall, the city’s chief of civic innovation technology, oversees the effort.“We’re making a distinction here where open data is information that is in a machine-readable format, used by both residents and businesses to answer questions, inform decisions they’re making and certainly for our own policymakers to educa...

Louisville, Kentucky’s Metro Council unanimously voted to codify the city’s open data practice and portal into law more than a decade after it was established via executive order. Grace Simrall, the city’s chief of civic innovation technology, oversees the effort.

“We’re making a distinction here where open data is information that is in a machine-readable format, used by both residents and businesses to answer questions, inform decisions they’re making and certainly for our own policymakers to educate them and help them when they are drafting legislation,” Simrall says on a new episode of the Priorities Podcast.

Since the portal’s launch, usage stats have continued to increase exponentially, Simrall says. Now, the portal receives about 18,000 pageviews per month.

“When we’re talking about 18,000 pageviews, that’s 18,000 fewer open records requests that are being made on our open records agency and departments, it means that residents get the information they’re looking for that much faster,” Simrall says.

Later on the show, Union City, Georgia, Mayor Vince Williams, explains how he’s approaching the smart cities movement in the Atlanta suburb. Williams says his city’s collaborative work with other governments in the region makes it stand out, specifically around public safety data sharing. Williams, who is also the president of the National League of Cities, says a key part of that is “making sure that current technology and innovative policies are designed as a way that will not only enhance connectivity and innovation, but also people.”

Williams also says investing in city IT and cybersecurity is paramount to achieving any kind of “smart city” vision.

“We must remember that it’s not just flying cars and robots, or a city that looks like the Jetsons,” Williams says. “It’s deploying everyday technologies or modern innovations that improve communities and also improve the quality of life of the residents that reside in our communities.”

That means that at the executive level, mayors need to be more engaged with the IT department, he says.

“It’s very important for me as a local leader, as the mayor of my city, to have real heart-to-heart robust discussions with our IT departments, our IT deliverers to make sure that we’re getting not only what we pay for, but also what are we missing?” Williams says.

In the news this week:

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration awarded more than $630 million in tribal broadband grants this month. The spree of grant funding will reach a total of 25 tribal entities spread across 13 states and is part of the agency’s Tribal Broadband Connectivity Program. The largest award — about $50.1 million — went to the Navajo Utility Authority to build out fiber.

Officials in Lexington, Kentucky, said the city lost about $4 million in federal housing assistance funds to an email fraud scheme. The theft included three wire transfers of funds for emergency rental assistance and transitional housing to a private bank account. A malicious actor impersonated an email account belonging to a local housing group to steal the money.

Mesa County, Colorado, Deputy Clerk Belinda Knisely plead guilty to three misdemeanor charges based on her participation in a May 2021 incident in which she and the county’s clerk allegedly allowed a 2020 election denier to attend a routine software update on the county’s vote tabulation equipment. Knisely also agreed to testify against her boss, Mesa County, Colorado, Clerk Tina Peters in the case.

StateScoop’s Priorities Podcast is available every Thursday. Listen more here.

If you want to hear more of the latest across the state and local government technology community, subscribe to the Priorities Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Soundcloud, Spotify and Stitcher.

Officials address Louisville’s maternal and infant mortality

Councilwoman Cassie Chambers Armstrong said the lives of women and babies are in a crisis in the Louisville Metro and across the commonwealth.LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Councilwoman Cassie Chambers Armstrong said the lives of women and babies are in a crisis in the Louisville Metro and across the commonwealth.On Wednesday, Armstrong announced a $10,000 grant to improve maternal and or infant health.Any nonprofitable charitable organization ...

Councilwoman Cassie Chambers Armstrong said the lives of women and babies are in a crisis in the Louisville Metro and across the commonwealth.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Councilwoman Cassie Chambers Armstrong said the lives of women and babies are in a crisis in the Louisville Metro and across the commonwealth.

On Wednesday, Armstrong announced a $10,000 grant to improve maternal and or infant health.

Any nonprofitable charitable organization is eligible to apply.

In 2018, Armstrong said Kentucky saw one-and-a-half women die per week on average from pregnancy related issue, a total of 76 women that year.

Armstrong added Kentucky’s abortion law is causing concern.

“More high risk pregnancies in a state with such poor health outcomes will directly translate into more women and infants dying,” Armstrong (D-8) said.

Armstrong said the statistics tell a story about poverty and disadvantage for the most vulnerable.

The city’s website cites, according to the Commonwealth Fund, that the United States has the highest rate of women dying from pregnancy-related complications of any high-income country.

“This is something that didn’t happen overnight,” Armstrong said. “It is because of a lot of neglect in terms of investing in communities, in terms of investing in populations. We are not going to fix it overnight. $10,000 is not going to fix it overnight. But it is time we get the conversation started.”

Death certificates show maternal deaths appear to be higher among Black women in the two largest urban areas in Kentucky: Lexington and Louisville.

Metro Health and Wellness added this is an issue facing the city.

”It affects their health overtime, it affects their well being, it affects their ability to graduate from school, their ability to be successful in adult life,” Leanne French with Metro Health and Wellness said.

Armstrong and Metro Health and Wellness said they plan for this investment to be the first step to reverse the city’s statistics.

“If Louisville is to become the cradle to career city we hear so often about, we must invest more in the cradle. In the moms and babies most at risk, who are suffering and dying because of our inaction,” Armstrong said.

To apply or learn more, click or tap here.

Copyright 2022 WAVE. All rights reserved.

20-acre park to be created in California neighborhood

It's been over a decade since this area was hit with intense flash flooding, now they are transforming that flood mitigated land.LOUISVILLE, Ky. — It's been over a decade since the California neighborhood was hit with intense flash flooding, now they are transforming that flood mitigated land.West Louisville is celebrating the creation of a 20-acre park.On Aug. 8, FEMA granted approval for ...

It's been over a decade since this area was hit with intense flash flooding, now they are transforming that flood mitigated land.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — It's been over a decade since the California neighborhood was hit with intense flash flooding, now they are transforming that flood mitigated land.

West Louisville is celebrating the creation of a 20-acre park.

On Aug. 8, FEMA granted approval for MSD to transition 114 properties, all permanently conserved as greenspace, to the city which is working with the Parks Alliance to transform this vacant land into a public park that will serve hundreds in the area.

“MSD strives to be a good neighbor in all the communities we serve. Giving back to the California neighborhood through acquiring these flood-prone properties for a community park is just one example of that commitment,” Tony Parrott, MSD executive director, said.

Following the flooding that occurred more than 10 years ago, MSD acquired these parcels through a federal Hazard Mitigation Grant, a program that enabled homeowners who chose to participate to sell their property at pre-flood value and relocate from the low-lying Maple Street area.

FEMA’s approval of the land transfer and phase I design plan allows for the first phase of park construction to begin later this year.

Brook Pardue, president and CEO of the Parks Alliance of Louisville, said that plans for the first phase will spread roughly across five acres.

These plans include all of the community’s most-requested features, such as a lawn for festivals/events/ athletics, walking paths and fitness stations, a picnic shelter and performance space, a playground and an outdoor classroom.

In addition, officials said Congressman John Yarmuth secured two federal Community Project Grants to improve quality of life in the California Neighborhood: $500,000 to the Parks Alliance of Louisville for construction of the new park and $480,000 to MSD for odor control improvements in and around the Maple Street area.

The funding will support repairs at 34 locations in the neighborhood to prevent odor-causing hydrogen sulfide gases from escaping the sewers.

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