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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Washington

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Washington, DC. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market – to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Washington’s leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you’re looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Washington. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it’s easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Washington, DC. We’re proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We’re here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That’s why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Washington,
what are we talking about?

Feta Cheese

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

Baba Ganoush

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

Baklava

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Washington, DC, you won’t want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it’s no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It’s best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party – you’re almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

Shawarma

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason – this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Washington, DC.

Hummus

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That’s because it’s considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there’s one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you’re looking to make some positive changes in your life, this “diet” is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures’ foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke – especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery – we’re always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It’s refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn’t have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don’t start with meats and sweets.

4.

They’re tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you’re essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That’s great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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Latest News in Washington

Snow to Hit DC Area, Expect a Slushy Thursday Morning Commute

Snowfall following an overnight rainstorm could spell a slippery, slow Thursday morning commute in the Washington, D.C., area, Storm Team4 says.During the day Wednesday, it will be breezy but milder with highs in the 40s. Weather troubles won’t start until after sunset.Rain is expected to arrive after 9 or 10 p.m. and continue overnight before shifting to snow early Thursday.The heaviest snow is set to fall around 7 a.m. About an inch is possible, with accumulation mainly on grass or untreated surfaces.Snow ...

Snowfall following an overnight rainstorm could spell a slippery, slow Thursday morning commute in the Washington, D.C., area, Storm Team4 says.

During the day Wednesday, it will be breezy but milder with highs in the 40s. Weather troubles won’t start until after sunset.

Rain is expected to arrive after 9 or 10 p.m. and continue overnight before shifting to snow early Thursday.

The heaviest snow is set to fall around 7 a.m. About an inch is possible, with accumulation mainly on grass or untreated surfaces.

Snow will move out of the region by 9 a.m., likely leaving behind slushy, slippery roads.

Since it will be raining overnight, road crews will have limited options for pretreating roads. This, combined with the fact that snowplows would be stuck in the morning rush hour, could lead to a very slow commute.

Breezy, Arctic air will settle in for the rest of Thursday. Highs will be in the mid- to upper 30s.

Friday and Saturday will be below freezing, and there’s a 30-40% chance of snow.

Stay with Storm Team4 as the forecast develops.

How Much Snow Could We Get Thursday? Here Are Potential Snow Totals

Bitter cold and bone-dry air from the Arctic will limit snowfall potential, Storm Team4 says. It's the timing of this snow, coupled with overnight rain, that could create rough road conditions.

Snow accumulations are expected to be around 1 inch but could approach 2 inches during the 6 to 10 a.m. window.

The National Weather Service says the “worst-case scenario” is 1.8 inches in D.C., 2 inches Leesburg, Virginia, and 2.1 inches in Frederick, Maryland, as of Wednesday morning.

Tracking a Second Winter Storm Starting Friday

The next storm to watch will come Friday night into Saturday. It will be cold enough for an all-snow event, but there may not be enough moisture for significant amounts. Since yesterday, the storm’s forecasting track has moved south. It now appears more likely that amounts of 6 inches or higher will be more likely south of Richmond, towards Virginia Beach and eastern North Carolina.

This is still a low confidence forecast and many variables remain uncertain at this point. Stay tuned for updates on the snow, but the cold is coming.

Here are four tips for staying safe this winter and our guide on packing an emergency kit to keep in your car.

Stay with Storm Team4 for the latest forecast. Download the NBC Washington app on iOS and Android to get severe weather alerts on your phone.

Washington DC High School Association to Add Swimming State Championship

The District of Columbia State Athletic Association (DCSAA) has announced that they will add “state championships for both wrestling and swimming this winter season. The addition was announced on December 8th, 2021.While the District of Columbia is not one of the 50 United States, the organization has adopted the traditional “state” monikers anyway to celebrate its city champions.DCSAA made the announcement, “The DCSAA is ecstatic to conduct state championships in both wrestling and swimming/diving this ...

The District of Columbia State Athletic Association (DCSAA) has announced that they will add “state championships for both wrestling and swimming this winter season. The addition was announced on December 8th, 2021.

While the District of Columbia is not one of the 50 United States, the organization has adopted the traditional “state” monikers anyway to celebrate its city champions.

DCSAA made the announcement, “The DCSAA is ecstatic to conduct state championships in both wrestling and swimming/diving this winter and provide additional opportunities for our student-athletes to compete,” DCSAA Executive Director Kenny Owens said. “High school sports play such an important role in the lives of so many youths. As we saw with the recent DCSAA State Championships in fall sports, our student-athletes look forward to these events with incredible anticipation. We can’t wait to crown wrestlers, swimmers and divers as state champions!”

The DC Metro Champs has been the season-ending championships meet for DC-area schools in the past. The meet has included both schools within Washington DC as well as close suburbs in Virginia and Maryland. Some of the schools of the suburbs have been home to Katie Ledecky, Jack Conger, and Phoebe Bacon. Ledecky was the first woman under 4:30 in the 500 freestyle at the 2014 DC Metro Champs.

The DCSAA swimming and diving state championships will be held Tuesday, February 15th and Wednesday, February 16th, 2022. Diving will take place on the 15th at Wilson Aquatic Center. Wilson Aquatic Center is one of DC’s parks and rec facilities. Swimming will take place on the 16th at Prince George’s Sports and Learning Center Aquatic Center which is located in Maryland, just outside the border of Washington DC.

The wrestling championships have been announced to be held the same week on Saturday, February 19th. The indoor track and field championships will take place on February 15th and 16th, the same days as swimming.

According to their website, the DCSAA is home to 52 high schools. This includes both public, private, and charter schools. The DCSAA has been around only since 2012. They currently award “DC State Championship Titles in 21 boys’ and girls’ interscholastic sports including E-Sports, in Division A and AA.” With the addition of wrestling and swimming, that number will now jump to 23.

The Washington DC area is home to one of the biggest club teams in the nation, Nation’s Capital Swim Club (NCAP). NCAP practices at Prince George’s Sports and Learning Center Aquatic Center. The team was also home to 2020 Tokyo Olympians Katie Ledecky, Phoebe Bacon, and Andrew Seliskar.

Washington DC is also home to four NCAA Division I swimming and diving programs. Those programs include American University in the Patriot League, Georgetown University in the Big East, The George Washington University in the Atlantic-10, and Howard University in Northeast Conference.

Crowds gather in Washington D.C. to see rare Snowy Owl

NewsWASHINGTON, D.C. - A little bit of the arctic is taking over the U.S. capital city and no it’s not the winter weather, but rather an owl and it’s captivated Washington, D.C.It’s a bird, it’s a plane, no wait, it is a bird. In fact, it’s a snowy owl making an unusual appearance in Washington, D.C. “Chances are the snowy owl at union station is a young bird on its first migration,” said Scott Weidensaul with P...

News

WASHINGTON, D.C. - A little bit of the arctic is taking over the U.S. capital city and no it’s not the winter weather, but rather an owl and it’s captivated Washington, D.C.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, no wait, it is a bird. In fact, it’s a snowy owl making an unusual appearance in Washington, D.C. “Chances are the snowy owl at union station is a young bird on its first migration,” said Scott Weidensaul with Project SNOWstorm, which tracks snowy owl movements.

Weidensaul said these arctic owls will usually migrate every winter as far south as southern Canada and the great lakes but every three to five years a population spike of lemmings, their primary food source, results in a snowy owl population boom. During those years, more owls migrate further and further south like this one, which has been spotted flying around D.C.’s union station for the past couple of weeks.

And this owl can certainly draw in some crowds.

“A lot of people are attracted to the owl,” said eleven year-old Andrew Tao who came to see the owl with his family.

“We heard there’s a rare snowy owl and we just wanted to come out and see it,” said Elijah St. Denis.

Almost every night, people flock to union station hoping to catch a glimpse or capture the owl on camera and if you’re lucky, see it take flight.

“That was pretty amazing,” said St. Denis. “My wife and I came out here on Friday trying to see it. We were out here about two, two and a half hours and didn’t and so we thought we have a little time on Monday lets go try again and then we saw the dramatic swoop.”

Weidensaul said these owls are curious about urban areas but cities also pose a threat to them. Planes, traffic and poisons given to rats they eat could be deadly. But Weidensaul encourages people to get out and see this owl while it’s still here.

"It’s obviously found a good spot to hunt every evening and it's just delighting people in Washington who rarely get a chance to see that piece of the arctic coming south like that,” said Weidensaul.

Researchers said there are about 30-thousand snowy owls around the world, putting them on the ‘vulnerable’ species list.

How Washington, D.C. Went Green

If you’re bringing your family to Washington, D.C., for a vacation, as I did recently, you know you’re supposed to see the capital’s greatest hits. The Washington Monument. The Smithsonian. The White House and Capitol. The memorials—Jefferson, Lincoln, FDR, MLK, Vietnam, World War II. The Native American and African American history museums. Washington has an abundance of cultural icons.But if you’re interested in the future, as well as...

If you’re bringing your family to Washington, D.C., for a vacation, as I did recently, you know you’re supposed to see the capital’s greatest hits. The Washington Monument. The Smithsonian. The White House and Capitol. The memorials—Jefferson, Lincoln, FDR, MLK, Vietnam, World War II. The Native American and African American history museums. Washington has an abundance of cultural icons.

But if you’re interested in the future, as well as the past, you should investigate one of the city’s newest cultural attractions, a 24-acre, mixed-use development on the Anacostia River called The Wharf. Located in Southwest Washington, The Wharf is easy to get to by foot, bike or scooter, by D.C.’s subway and bus systems (known as the “Metro”), even by water taxi. It used to be a light industrial neighborhood, probably best known for its fish market, which dates to 1805. But after a recent multi-billion-dollar transformation, The Wharf is a bustling complex featuring residential, retail and commercial development, including some 14 acres of park and public spaces. Locals and tourists visit The Wharf to dine at restaurants like Mi Vida, an excellent Mexican place, or the Rappahannock Oyster Bar. They can hear live music at The Anthem, which this fall had scheduled youth-oriented artists such as Phoebe Bridgers and Pigeons Playing Ping-Pong. They can rent a kayak and paddle on the river. Or they can visit the revitalized Municipal Fish Market, with its rows of booths offering crab legs, spiced shrimp, lobster and seemingly countless species of fish packed on ice.

What the casual visitor may not see is that The Wharf is an advertisement for urban sustainability. To get a birds-eye view of that perspective, try typing “The Wharf D.C.” into Google Earth. As the satellite camera homes in on its rooftops, you’ll see square after square of green—rooftop gardens, to capture rainwater that would otherwise run off into the Anacostia. You might also see what look like gardens in the river itself. They’re known as “floating wetland systems,” and they help filter the river water while providing habitats for fish and other life. You might be able to see the ubiquitous, integrated bike trails and prominently placed bike racks. Less visible are the built-in touches, like the fact that all the buildings at The Wharf are LEED-certified, that developer Hoffman-Madison Waterfront constructed a 600,000-gallon cistern and permeable pavements to help collect rainwater run-off and prevent it from polluting the river. The hotel where I stayed, The InterContinental Washington, D.C.—The Wharf, is LEED Gold, from its green roof to its recycled construction materials to the absence of those environmentally indefensible shampoo bottles in its bathrooms. In January 2022, the Intercontinental will be hosting “Organic Week,” a conference by the Organic Trade Association. “We know you care about sustainability, and so does the InterContinental,” the hotel proclaims in materials promoting the event. And sustainability also means trying to foster economic equity in your own backyard; over 70 percent of the InterContinental’s employees live in the D.C. area.

The Wharf isn’t just an example of environmentally progressive urban redevelopment, it’s a demonstration of how Washington, D.C. has, quietly and without a lot of fanfare, transformed itself into one of the country’s most sustainable cities. That may come as a surprise to people who wouldn’t expect it from the nation’s capital. Typically, when Americans think of sustainable cities—those that work to reduce their carbon emissions, facilitate clean energy use, and promote good health and shared prosperity—we think of outdoors-oriented, western cities like San Francisco, Denver or Portland, Oregon. Washington is better known as the home of the federal government, full of contention and seemingly incapable of forward motion. But that bad reputation obscures the impact of D.C.’s local government and the engagement of its residents. In the space of about two decades, Washington has made itself into an environmental leader, demonstrating how cities can reduce their impact on the planet while improving the quality of life for their citizens. In 2017, the United States Green Building Council, which developed the LEED ratings systems, declared Washington the world’s first LEED Platinum city, an award created to honor leadership in sustainability.

Washington’s green evolution really began with buildings, which are estimated to generate over 70 percent of the city’s greenhouse gas emissions.

In 2006, pushed by a local activists, subject experts and a liberal city council, D.C. mayor Anthony Williams signed the Green Building Act, which mandated that all public or publicly financed buildings had to meet LEED Silver (or higher) requirements. For public housing and public schools, the mandates were even stricter—they had to be LEED Gold. For lower income citizens of Washington, many of whom are Black, that stipulation “sent a message to parents that they could educate their kids in D.C. and not have to move out of the school district,” says Anica Landreneau, the head of sustainable design at global architecture-engineering firm HOK. The mandate for affordable housing would have a tangible impact on residents’ quality of life, translating into lower energy bills and better health. LEED-certified buildings have a positive impact on respiratory health, and several published studies have shown that they reduce the number of lost work and school days, as well as emergency room visits, due to asthma.

The Green Building Act also stipulated that, as of 2012, commercial buildings of at least 50,000-square-feet would have to be LEED-certified. (The law has since been modified to apply to buildings 10,000-square-feet and bigger.) “That law was one of the first in the country to mandate that privately constructed buildings had to meet LEED standards,” says Cliff Majersik, a policy analyst at the D.C.-based Institute for Market Transformation who helped write the legislation.

Before D.C.’s Green Building Act, cities tended to encourage developers to meet LEED requirements by offering tax incentives or accelerated building permitting. The impact was modest. But within a few years, Majersik says, over 100 cities had passed laws similar to Washington’s. The reason? For one thing, the requirements didn’t send any potential developers fleeing for other, less-regulated cities. In D.C., developers quickly bought into the idea. Clients, it turned out, liked sustainable buildings, which meant that developers could lease or sell LEED-certified space at a premium. When the trend became apparent, “nobody wanted to build the last brown building on the block,” says Landreneau.

D.C. also benefitted from the fact that it houses the federal government: If you needed to work with the government, you had to be in Washington, LEED requirement or not. That constituency includes a sizable number of environmental non-profits, which supported D.C.’s policy initiatives both in spirit and more concretely—their staffers often provided policy expertise and legal advice. And the federal government, itself, under the Bush and Obama administrations, began mandating that new or substantially renovated federal buildings also meet LEED Gold requirements.

“Within maybe five years of the [2006] law’s passage, the fact that buildings needed to be LEED-certified was immaterial” to developers, says Lindsey Falasca, director of IMT’s High Performance Building Hub. “They were just going to do it.” Adds Landreneau, “There is no longer a premium for green construction [in Washington] because it’s the only kind of construction in town.”

The grass-roots wave of environmental concern—and the success of the resulting measures—brought other efforts toward sustainability. Completed in 2008, the Washington Nationals baseball stadium, Nationals Park, was the first LEED-certified major sports stadium in the country. That same year, D.C. launched a bike-sharing program, the first of any big city in the country; it now has some 500 solar-powered bike stations. (And Washington buses come equipped with bike racks on their fronts, to facilitate multiple-stage trips.) That was followed by scooter programs and, more recently, a moped system. D.C. offers extensive public transportation, from its underground Metro to a bus system that includes a zero-emission circulator bus network. “I’ve never been anywhere else in America with as many mobility options as there are here in Washington,” says Falasca.

Some improvements are granular: A 2009 law imposed a five-cent tax charge on plastic and paper bags. In 2019, Washington banned restaurants and other businesses from using plastic straws (only Seattle preceded Washington’s move). Almost certainly most impactful was the systemic change, the enthusiasm with which the District government came to embrace and internalize the ethos of sustainability. One example: the city’s Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE), once a tiny agency, now has a staff of over 300. “Now, in D.C, you have the attitude, ‘That’s great, we can be the first.’”

In 2019, the DOEE helped Washington mayor Muriel Bowser launched a plan called “Sustainable D.C.” It sets Washington on a path to being carbon-neutral by the year 2050. Even sooner, Sustainable D.C. mandates that 100 percent of the city’s electricity come from renewable sources by the year 2032. And all of this is being done with a concerted focus on equity and inclusion. As the Sustainable D.C. plan points out, communities of color are more likely to suffer from “deep and persistent gaps in income, health, employment and education.” Any city aspiring to a meaningful definition of sustainability must address those gaps. One example of how D.C. is trying to do that: It’s building a new hospital in the Anacostia neighborhood, one of the city’s poorer sections. That hospital will be LEED-certified for health care, “which is more stringent than regular LEED,” explains Landreneau. The city’s best-known hospitals, which typically serve a more affluent population—at Georgetown and George Washington universities, for example—don’t meet that certification. “So, the greenest hospital in the district is going to go to Anacostia,” Landreneau explains. “There’s something to be said for that.”

None of this is to say that D.C. has solved all its sustainability challenges. Car traffic in and around the city is still a serious problem. A more human toll comes from the city’s plague of gun violence, mostly in its poorer neighborhoods; you can’t say a city is sustainable if its young people are killing each other at alarming rates.

But the work Washington has done to make itself sustainable has not only helped the fight against climate change, it has made Washington a remarkably livable and appealing place, where concern for the environment isn’t just a marginal concern but part of the fabric of everyday life. Working on sustainability “feels really good,” says Cliff Majersik. “You’re helping transform the city for the better.”

More Snow Possible Thursday Amid Wind-Chilled Week in DC Area

Storm Team4 is tracking a chance for more snow on Thursday morning amid a mostly cold, windy week in the Washington, D.C., area.Gusty winds will continue to batter the region for several more days, before and after Thursday’s snow chance.Tuesday will have northwest winds of 15 to 30 mph. It will be partly to mostly sunny with temperatures nearing 40°, but wind chills will remain in the mid-20s.Winds will shift to the south by Wednesday, bringing some milder air. Highs on Wednesday afternoon will be close to 50&...

Storm Team4 is tracking a chance for more snow on Thursday morning amid a mostly cold, windy week in the Washington, D.C., area.

Gusty winds will continue to batter the region for several more days, before and after Thursday’s snow chance.

Tuesday will have northwest winds of 15 to 30 mph. It will be partly to mostly sunny with temperatures nearing 40°, but wind chills will remain in the mid-20s.

Winds will shift to the south by Wednesday, bringing some milder air. Highs on Wednesday afternoon will be close to 50°.

The D.C. area is looking dry through the day on Wednesday, but rain is expected after 8 p.m. Expect just rain until around 3 or 4 a.m. Thursday morning. Then, a transition to a wintry mix or snow becomes likely, Storm Team4 says.

Snow could last from about 5 a.m. to 11 a.m. Thursday morning. The timing of this snow chance could make it impactful for commuters. However, the afternoon will be dry, windy and cold.

The next chance for snow isn’t far away. A front is expected to stall off the Carolina coast on Friday and complicate the weekend forecast, possibly setting up a snowstorm for Friday evening into Saturday morning. Weather models disagree on how substantial snowfall would be near D.C.

Stay with Storm Team4 as the forecast develops.

How much snow on Thursday? Potential snow totals

Bitter cold and bone-dry air from the Arctic will limit snowfall potential, Storm Team4 says.

Storm Team4 says you’ll most likely see a coating of white from a half-inch to 1.5 inches of snowfall.

As of Tuesday morning, here are the odds for Thursday's snowfall:

Here are four tips for staying safe this winter and our guide on packing an emergency kit to keep in your car.

Stay with Storm Team4 for the latest forecast. Download the NBC Washington app on iOS and Android to get severe weather alerts on your phone.

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