MediterraneanGrocery Wholesalers in Tulsa, OK

Mediterranean Grocery Wholesalers Mobile Number770-795-9026

Free Estimate

We promise a 100% satisfaction guarantee

The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Tulsa

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Tulsa, OK. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market – to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Tulsa’s leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you’re looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Tulsa. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it’s easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Tulsa, OK. We’re proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We’re here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That’s why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Tulsa,
what are we talking about?

Feta Cheese

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

Baba Ganoush

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

Baklava

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Tulsa, OK, you won’t want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it’s no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It’s best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party – you’re almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

Shawarma

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason – this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Tulsa, OK.

Hummus

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That’s because it’s considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there’s one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you’re looking to make some positive changes in your life, this “diet” is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures’ foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke – especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery – we’re always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It’s refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn’t have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don’t start with meats and sweets.

4.

They’re tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you’re essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That’s great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

Free Estimate

Latest News in Tulsa

Tulsa Health Officials, Mayor Bynum Give Update On COVID Status

TULSA, Oklahoma - More than 66,000 Oklahomans have active cases of COVID-19, according to the State Department of Health, but those numbers don't include any infections detected through home testing or the thousands of people waiting for results. They say the actual number is higher because thousands of people are waiting for results. The bottleneck at the moment is testing, with hospitals still urging people to not come into the ER unless they're critically ill.Tulsa County's busiest test site, the Saint Francis Urgent ...

TULSA, Oklahoma -

More than 66,000 Oklahomans have active cases of COVID-19, according to the State Department of Health, but those numbers don't include any infections detected through home testing or the thousands of people waiting for results. They say the actual number is higher because thousands of people are waiting for results. The bottleneck at the moment is testing, with hospitals still urging people to not come into the ER unless they're critically ill.

Tulsa County's busiest test site, the Saint Francis Urgent Care in Broken Arrow, is testing about 800 people each day. A long line of cars stretches through the nearby neighborhood, and at the end of the line, a competing testing company is there recruiting customers for a site a few miles away at 101st and Sheridan. "It's a lot quicker and more convenient than waiting in line for 4 to 5 hours," said Lee Davis, with Cedar creek Labs.

The Tulsa Health Department recognizes the wait for testing and says they have ramped up their test capacity about as much as they can. They are also busy vaccinating people to prevent serious illness. They continue to recommend testing for people with symptoms, or for immuno-compromised people who have been exposed.

Tulsa Co Vaccine

"This makes a lot of people very very ill," said Dr. Bruce Dart, the Director of Tulsa Health. "That's evidenced by our numbers of cases, hospitalizations and deaths as well. Mild is a relative term and nobody wants to find out if they'll have a particularly mild case or not." Dart calls the current rate of infection a worst-case scenario, with each contagious person infecting as many as 10 other people. Dart said current wastewater sampling in Tulsa shows 95% of the infections are the more contagious Omicron variant.

There's not a wait, or a cost, for the vaccine that is preventing almost all serious illnesses in those who take it and have current boosters. "The Covid vaccine supplies are adequate. We have a lot in the County and people should be able to get it" said Ellen Niemitolo, the Clinical Director for Tulsa Health.

Tulsa's Mayor said hospitals are burdened now with people showing up there for testing, when they don't require acute care, and asked people to seek out testing elsewhere, even though it can be hard to find and require a wait.

"People have to get vaccinated if they're not already," said Bynum. "Unless you have a medical reason to not get vaccinated, there really is no excuse at this point."

Home tests are hard to find in local pharmacies. The Health Department takes appointments online for both the vaccine and testing. The 2-1-1 referral system can also direct people into testing, and several private testing companies have opened pop-up sites throughout Tulsa.

An Oklahoma pastor has apologized after smearing his spit in a man’s eye during a sermon: ‘It got too live’

Todd held it as he finished telling his Tulsa megachurch congregation that Jesus Christ had rubbed his own saliva on a blind man’s eyes to miraculously give him sight.He held it in one hand as he used the other to touch the shoulder of a man standing beside him with his eyes closed.“God’s saying, ‘Can you physically and spiritually and emotionally … stand when getting the vision or receiving it might get nasty?’” Todd asked.Then, the pastor of Transformation Church rubbed his ha...

Todd held it as he finished telling his Tulsa megachurch congregation that Jesus Christ had rubbed his own saliva on a blind man’s eyes to miraculously give him sight.

He held it in one hand as he used the other to touch the shoulder of a man standing beside him with his eyes closed.

“God’s saying, ‘Can you physically and spiritually and emotionally … stand when getting the vision or receiving it might get nasty?’” Todd asked.

Then, the pastor of Transformation Church rubbed his hands together, turned to the man and smeared his spit across the man’s face.

Parishioners gasped and groaned. Clips of the sermon have gone viral, including one that had been viewed 1.7 million times as of Tuesday morning. People questioned Todd’s theatrics as coronavirus infections in Oklahoma have jumped 56 percent in the past week, according to The Washington Post’s covid-19 tracker.

Todd has since apologized on Twitter and Facebook, calling his actions “disgusting” and saying they “crossed the line.” Todd said he’s passionate about giving people hope, “so much so that I try to do extreme things.”

“That was a distraction to what I was really trying to do,” he said in a video message. “I was really trying to make the Word come alive and for people to see the story. But yesterday it got too live, and I own that.”

Todd and the Tulsa World identified the man whose face he’d wiped his spit on as his brother, who did not immediately respond to messages from The Post.

It’s a bump in a journey that started in 2015 when Todd took over as lead pastor at Transformation Church with its congregation of about 300 that, at the time, was worshiping in a former grocery store, the Tulsa World reported in October. He has since helped grow the church that, at its last in-person service in March 2020, drew in roughly 4,200 parishioners.

The pandemic has not slowed Todd and Transformation, according to the newspaper. As many as 24,000 watch the church’s services online. In the past two years, the church more than tripled its staff from 30 employees to 100-plus, the paper reported. To keep pace, it spent $66 million buying property, including one of the Tulsa area’s largest office buildings.

Gary McIntosh, founding pastor of the church, told the Tulsa World that Todd achieved his vision of what Transformation could be — a place of worship that could transcend barriers and resonate with anyone.

“He can speak to a younger generation — and he does that exceptionally well — but hold the attention of an older generation,” McIntosh said.

On Monday, while apologizing for his sermon the day before, Todd joked about what happened “when the spit hit the fan.” He said he’d checked in with his brother to see how he was doing after the uproar.

The incident came about 40 minutes into Todd’s two-hour service. He started that part of his sermon referencing Mark 8:22-25, a passage in which Jesus and his disciples arrive at the village of Bethsaida and are quickly met by people begging him to heal a blind man. Jesus did, eventually, but first took the man outside the village before rubbing spit on his eyes, thus restoring his sight.

In his sermon, Todd said Jesus escorted the blind away from Bethsaida before performing the miracle because he didn’t want to debase the man in public.

Within minutes, Todd was rubbing spit across his brother’s face in front of his congregation, both in-person and online.

How this 22-year-old earns and spends $200,000 a year in Tulsa, OK

This story is part of CNBC Make It’s Millennial Money series, which details how people around the world earn, spend and save their money.At the end of 2020, Aaron Brock left his home and family in New Jersey and moved to Oklahoma.Brock and a friend had both applied to the Tulsa Remote program, which pays participants to move to Tulsa, on a wh...

This story is part of CNBC Make It’s Millennial Money series, which details how people around the world earn, spend and save their money.

At the end of 2020, Aaron Brock left his home and family in New Jersey and moved to Oklahoma.

Brock and a friend had both applied to the Tulsa Remote program, which pays participants to move to Tulsa, on a whim. When they were both accepted, they knew they wanted to do it. “We were like, ‘Man, this is an opportunity we can’t turn down,’” Brock, 22, tells CNBC Make It.

Since he works remotely as a technical presales engineer, earning $200,000 per year, Brock was able to qualify for the program and make the move without worrying about cost.

Tulsa Remote is a recruitment initiative that aims to attract remote workers to the city. Its primary perk is a $10,000 grant, which is distributed over the course of one year, during which participants are obligated to live and work within Tulsa’s city limits.

The program focuses on community building and aims to help participants “integrate into the local fabric, creating strong interpersonal affinities and nurturing relationships,” a program representative tells CNBC Make It.

Aaron Brock and a friend both applied to the Tulsa Remote program, which pays participants to move to Tulsa, on a whim.

CNBC Make It

In addition to the money and lower cost of living, the community aspect was a major draw for Brock, who was eager to get involved. ”[The program develops] a community and they do a really good job of, ‘Hey, I can just jump into a social group,’” he says. “I don’t need to move to a new city, be the only person there and have to build it all up from scratch.”

Before the move, Brock had mostly lived with or nearby his parents. It was difficult for him to leave them, but “there’s a time when it’s like, ‘Hey, I’ve got to go try by myself, be a proper real adult,’” he says.

Finding his passion

The youngest of four siblings, Brock was homeschooled growing up and spent a significant amount of time with his parents, who allowed him to freely explore his interests and find his passion. He started learning to program when he was about 6, and was immediately hooked.

By 14, Brock was getting paid to work on Minecraft when friends offered him gigs, and at 16, he says he got a longer-term job with a single server earning $1,500 per month for about eight months. “It paid for my first two cars.”

Aaron Brock earns $200,000 per year as a technical presales engineer.

CNBC Make It

When Brock was 18, a mentor he met at a robotics club when he was a kid offered him a job as a DevOps engineer. He decided to accept it instead of going to college. “It just didn’t make financial sense to take four years and however much it would have cost to go to college instead,” he says.

Though he enjoyed the work, Brock learned some tough lessons early on. For one, he was unknowingly underpaid in his first job as an engineer, he says. “I got paid $15 an hour. I missed out on a large amount of money by not negotiating that salary or having any idea of what the salary was supposed to be.” The average base salary for a DevOps engineer was $97,098 per year as of 2021, according to Payscale.

Now four years into his career, Brock earns about $200,000 annually as a technical presales engineer. That includes his base salary of $170,000 and a 20% bonus based on commissions. While his current company offered him $150,000 initially, Brock negotiated up to the amount he earns now.

Brock feels very comfortable living in Oklahoma on this salary, even without the Tulsa Remote program’s grant. So much so that he’s able to save the majority of what he earns.

How he spends his money

Here are Brock’s monthly expenses for December 2021.

From November 2020 to November 2021, most of Brock’s expenses, including rent, utilities and groceries, were covered by the Tulsa Remote program and its grant. To Brock, it was an opportunity to save, especially with his high salary.

“I’m young, I make a lot of money, and I recognize that the money that I make now is more valuable than the money I make later,” Brock says. “If I can live very minimally at the moment and save that money, it’ll be accruing interest, whereas if I live lavishly now and then live modestly in the future, I won’t have that added interest.”

To accomplish that, Brock tries to max out all of his retirement vehicles. In December, he allocated $2,649 to his 401(k), bringing his contributions to the maximum $19,500 allowed for the year. Previously, he maxed out his Roth IRA during the years his salary was within the permitted range.

I’m young, I make a lot of money, and I recognize that the money that I make now is more valuable than the money I make later.Aaron Brock

In addition to this 401(k), Brock saved about $9,047, bringing his total savings to around $11,697 in December. He typically saves more and separately invests an additional amount, but in December spent $25,000 to buy a van to travel throughout 2022.

“I have a FIRE mentality,” Brock says, referring to the Financial Independence, Retire Early movement. He intends to retire early and plans to have enough saved to do so in his 30s.

Brock also doesn’t have any debt. He treats his credit cards like debit cards, paying off the entire balance each month.

Outside of savings and investments, Brock aims to spend just $1,000 to $1,500 on expenses each month. He does have help from his parents, who pay for his phone bill, health insurance, Netflix subscription and Costco membership. Brock has been included on their family plans since before he moved and hasn’t branched off yet.

In addition to eating the same meals over and over, Brock chooses to only wear purple. It helps him avoid decision fatigue and limit the number of clothes he owns.

“I really dislike having stuff, just in general. If you own something, you have to take care of it and it owns you,” he says. “Also, I like to not have to make decisions each day and always wear the same thing, like Steve Jobs.”

Looking ahead

Brock plans to leave Tulsa this year, and start traveling across the country — even though it will cost more than his life in Oklahoma.

“When I looked into getting a van, I determined that this is actually not the best financial decision,” he says. “A lot of cost goes into a van, be it insurance, maintenance and all of the fun, weird stops that you have to make along the way.”

His budget for the year is $14,000, Brock says, which includes insurance and maintenance for the van; sales tax from buying the van; the added costs of living in it, like potentially having to dine out more; and the depreciation of the van over time. Since he works remotely, Brock will easily be able to keep his current job while traveling.

“Down the line, Tulsa is fantastic,” Aaron Brock says. “I would not be against moving back once I decide to cease the nomadic lifestyle.”

CNBC Make It

Brock loves living in Tulsa, and even though he hasn’t planned past his adventure for 2022, he says he would be happy to return to the city once he’s done traveling. “Down the line, Tulsa is fantastic,” he says. “I would not be against moving back once I decide to cease the nomadic lifestyle.”

As for leaving the program after a little more than a year, “They have a goal of making me stay there longer, but the agreement is to try it out for a year. I held up that side of the agreement and I tried it out for a year and I thought it was great,” Brock says.

But, ultimately, he says he’s not ready to settle down anywhere just yet. “I’m gonna be living a very different lifestyle for a bit.”

Brock plans to continue saving as well. His goal is to save at least $2 million, so he can retire in his early 30s if he wants to. If he continues to save and invest as much as he does now, Brock is on track to achieve that goal.

“If you follow the 4% rule, that puts me at about $80,000 a year without touching the principal. While $80,000 is a lot less than I make currently, it’s a lot more than I spend currently,” Brock says. However, he’d ideally prefer to be able to live a bit more “lavish” lifestyle and ultimately have $3 million or $4 million for retirement.

Right now, though, “I’m focused on life experience,” he says. “I would like to see the world and experience things that I haven’t done before. I’m in a comfortable place to do that.”

What’s your budget breakdown? Share your story with us for a chance to be featured in a future installment.

Sign up now: Get smarter about your money and career with our weekly newsletter

Don’t miss: This 29-year-old USPS mail carrier is on track to make over $90,000 this year—here’s how he spends his money

VIDEO7:2007:20

How a 29-year-old USPS worker on track to make over $90,000 spends his money

Millennial Money

Surge in COVID patients contribute to longer wait times for Oklahoma ERs

--> Sorry, we're having issues playing this video.In the meantime, try watching one of the videos below.TULSA, Okla. — Our current surge in COVID-19 cases is making wait times even longer in Oklahoma emergency rooms.Medical professionals are urging the public to avoid the emergency departments to minimize congestion unless critical care is needed.Barbara Casey told 2 News that she and her daughter waited outside of a Tulsa hospital for more than 12-hours after her daughter had a flare-up from her Crohn&r...

-->

Sorry, we're having issues playing this video.In the meantime, try watching one of the videos below.

TULSA, Okla. — Our current surge in COVID-19 cases is making wait times even longer in Oklahoma emergency rooms.

Medical professionals are urging the public to avoid the emergency departments to minimize congestion unless critical care is needed.

Barbara Casey told 2 News that she and her daughter waited outside of a Tulsa hospital for more than 12-hours after her daughter had a flare-up from her Crohn’s disease. Casey says they originally wanted to avoid the ER by going to her daughter’s gastroenterologist first.

“When they got her blood work, they called and said she probably should be admitted to the hospital,” Casey said.

They drove from Tahlequah to Tulsa for treatment. On the way, her daughter’s condition worsened after she was unable to drink water.

“She couldn’t even keep ice chips down. So, I called them back and they said take her to the emergency room,” Casey said.

They arrived at the e-r around 1 p.m. Tuesday afternoon. However, after receiving some IV fluids, it wasn’t until midnight when she finally received medication.

According to State Health Officials, patients with COVID-19 are filling up hospitals on a daily basis. To minimize congestion and exposure to the virus, medical experts are urging the public to avoid the ER unless critical care is needed. COVID testing, low-grade fevers, cough and runny nose can be treated at Urgent Cares; that also includes issues like muscle pain, sprains, cuts and minor burns.

“One reason we are trying to get people to avoid the ER’s, for example, just to get tested, is so that we have rooms available for hospitals to care for those people coming in for other reasons,” commission for the State Dept. of Health Keith Reed said.

When a patient arrives at the ER, a triage nurse will assess the patient's condition. Depending on severity, patients will either wait, or go immediately to an emergency room.

If you need medical attention for COVID-19, the CDC recommends you go to the ER if you have trouble breathing, persistent chest pain, confusion, unable to stay awake or if your skin becomes pale or blue. To learn more, CLICK HERE.

Stay in touch with us anytime, anywhere --

Report: Auburn DC Derek Mason "strong candidate" for Oklahoma State DC job

STILLWATER — Oklahoma State’s month and a half long search for its next defensive coordinator could soon be coming to a close.The Athletic’s Bruce Feldman reported late Wednesday that Auburn defensive coordinator Derek Mason “has emerged as a strong candidate” for the vacancy left by Jim Knowles. Mason, 52, spent the past year on Bryan Harsin’s staff following seven seasons in the top job at Vanderbilt from 2014-20.SOURCES: Auburn...

STILLWATER — Oklahoma State’s month and a half long search for its next defensive coordinator could soon be coming to a close.

The Athletic’s Bruce Feldman reported late Wednesday that Auburn defensive coordinator Derek Mason “has emerged as a strong candidate” for the vacancy left by Jim Knowles. Mason, 52, spent the past year on Bryan Harsin’s staff following seven seasons in the top job at Vanderbilt from 2014-20.

SOURCES: Auburn DC Derek Mason has emerged as a strong candidate for the Oklahoma State defensive coordinator vacancy. The Tigers ranked No. 4 in the SEC this year in fewest yards per play allowed.

— Bruce Feldman (@BruceFeldmanCFB) January 20, 2022

The Cowboys' defensive coordinator role has been open since Knowles’ departure for Ohio State on Dec. 7 following his fourth season at OSU. With the 56-year old play caller at the helm, the Cowboys finished fifth in total defense, led the nations in sacks (57) and closed second in tackles for loss (114) in 2021.

Without Knowles for the Jan. 1 Fiesta Bowl, coach Mike Gundy opted against appointing an interim coordinator and handed the play calling reins to a trio of assistants — Joe Bob Clements, Tim Duffie and Dan Hammerschmidt — for OSU's 37-35 win over Notre Dame.

The following day, OSU’s 18th-year head coach said he would interview “six or eight guys” if he chose to look outside the program for his first defensive coordinator hire since 2018.

Mason would arrive in Stillwater with SEC pedigree after spending the past eight years in the conference. He spent the bulk of the last decade as head coach at Vanderbilt where he completed a 27-55 record across his seven seasons with the Commodores, reaching six wins only twice.

After Mason was fired in late Nov. 2020, he joined Harsin's inaugural coaching staff at Auburn on Jan. 7, 2021.

The Tigers allowed 21.8 points per game, 27th in the nation and third-best in the SEC, during Mason's lone season in charge. Auburn's 373.8 yards allowed per game ranked 61st in the country.

Gundy and Mason hold no direct connections but have twice crossed paths in the past.

Mason was the co-defensive coordinator at Stanford in 2011 when OSU capped Big 12 title season with a 41-38 Fiesta Bowl win over the Cardinal. More recently, the two coaches shared the screen on ESPN's coaches' film room during the 2020 national championship game alongside Boston College's Jeff Hafley and former TCU coach Gary Patterson.

Mason's resume includes assistant roles at Idaho State, Bucknell, Utah, New Mexico State, Ohio and the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings prior to arriving to Stanford in 2010. He was later promoted to the sole coordinator role and was a finalist for the Broyles award in 2012.

Per the Montgomery Advertiser, Mason is paid $1.5 million per year in his current role at Auburn. Knowles earned $800,000 annually before inking a $1.9 million per year with Ohio State that places him among the nation’s highest paid assistants.

Knowles' exit, with assistant Koy McFarland following him to Ohio State, leaves OSU without a linebackers coach. In that sense, Mason — whose previous experience lies in coaching defensive backs — is no a perfect fit.

But in his search for Knowles' replacement, Gundy may be flexible. On Jan. 2, his emphasis hung on the importance of finding a play caller who shared the same in-game qualities that made Knowles — and in turn the Cowboys' defense — so successful.

"(The person) has to be highly intelligent," Gundy said. "And has to be very savvy and quick thinking on game day, in my opinion. Whether you’re three-down or you’re four-down, or you’re blitzing or you’re a zone team, that’s pretty consistent in college football.

"Can you think and make the calls on game day. Do you know when to bunt? Do you know when to hit and run? That’s what makes a good coordinator in my opinion."

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.