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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Tucson

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Tucson, AZ. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Tucson's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Tucson. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Tucson, AZ. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Tucson, AZ

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Tucson,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Tucson, AZ

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Tucson, AZ

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Tucson, AZ

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Tucson, AZ, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Tucson, AZ

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Tucson, AZ

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Tucson, AZ.

 Greek Grocery Store Tucson, AZ

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Tucson, AZ

Latest News in Tucson, AZ

Hansen's Top Teams, No. 78: Wildcats won first WCWS title in 1991

There were five home runs hit in the ’91 World Series. This year, national champion Oklahoma itself hit 16 home runs at the WCWS.Attendance in the championship game, a stunning 5-1 Arizona victory over seemingly indestructible UCLA, was 1,881. The WCWS was two years removed from playing on a rec-league four-plex in Sunnyvale, California, a few miles from the San Francisco airport. This year, every evening session of the tournament drew more than 12,000 fans.The ’91 championship game was televised — but not unt...

There were five home runs hit in the ’91 World Series. This year, national champion Oklahoma itself hit 16 home runs at the WCWS.

Attendance in the championship game, a stunning 5-1 Arizona victory over seemingly indestructible UCLA, was 1,881. The WCWS was two years removed from playing on a rec-league four-plex in Sunnyvale, California, a few miles from the San Francisco airport. This year, every evening session of the tournament drew more than 12,000 fans.

The ’91 championship game was televised — but not until 10 days later on ESPN at 10 a.m. on a Sunday. This year, every WCWS game was televised live by an ESPN channel.

Arizona’s team ERA in 1991 was 0.63, less than one run per game. This year, the UA’s team ERA was 3.19.

The UA played its 1991 home games on the PE field behind the Gittings Building on campus. Temporary bleachers seating about 300 were available. Now, the school’s $8 million Hillenbrand Stadium seats close to 3,000.

About the only thing that hasn’t changed from 1991 to 2022 is that winning the national championship carries the same weight.

Arizona was a significant underdog in 1991 at Oklahoma City. The Wildcats finished fourth in the Pac-10, a league that consisted of just six teams. Candrea’s club finished 11-9 in the conference but swept ASU 4-2 and 4-0 in a Tempe regional to qualify for the World Series. The Sun Devils finished second in the Pac-10 at 15-5.

When the Wildcats upset mighty UCLA in the finals, Bruins coach Sue Enquist came off as insulted more than disappointed or surprised. The Bruins had gone 163-19 the three previous seasons, all resulting in national titles.

“That’s a real slap in the face,” she said. “We’re all stunned.”

After that, losing to Arizona would become more routine than anything else. Candrea’s club went on to win national titles in 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2006 and 2007. Underdogs? Hardly.

College softball in 1991 was a series of 1-0 and 2-1 games, completed in 75 minutes or so, with a so-called “dead ball” in use. (The NCAA introduced a livelier ball in 1993 and scoring multiplied).

To his credit, Candrea built his team around pitching, defense and timely hitting. The ’91 Wildcats hit just five home runs. This year the Wildcats hit 96.

One of the reasons Candrea became (at the time of his 2021 retirement) the winningest coach in NCAA softball history was that his eye for talent and his ability to develop the talent-on-hand was rarely matched. He was ahead of the game, both in strategy, scouting, the short-game and game-day adjustments.

He found the key players on his ’91 championship team in under-the-radar spots.

Star first baseman Julie Jones transferred from Yuma’s Arizona Western College. All-World Series outfielder Kristin Gauthier was also from Yuma. Right-fielder Stacy Redondo was from Cholla High School. Second baseman Marcie Aguilar, a transfer from Pima College, played high school ball at Pueblo. Jamie Heggen, a starting outfielder, was a transfer from Moorpark Junior College in SoCal.

Sophomore catcher Jody Miller, a rock of stability over four Arizona seasons, was recruited from Phoenix’s Moon Valley High School.

But Candrea’s biggest recruiting coup was pitcher Debby Day, who he discovered and correctly evaluated after two seasons at UT-Arlington. Day out-pitched future softball Hall of Famer Lisa Fernandez of UCLA at the World Series. In 1991, Day. 30-8, started 35 games and completed all 35.

She had significant backup help from freshman Susie Parra of Scottsdale’s Chaparral High School, 13-2 overall. Parra would become the No. 1 pitcher in college softball before leaving Arizona with two more national championship rings, in 1993 and 1994.

The margin for error at the 1991 WCWS was much smaller than it has been the last 30 years.

Said Candrea: “You had to wait for someone to make a mistake, to get a runner on base. That’s how you won.”

A few years later, Candrea was among the first to take advantage of the new elements of college softball: power and speed. But in 1991, it was all about pitching and reducing mistakes.

“When it got to crunch time,” he said, “we had what it takes.”

Arizona monsoon season: Here's when to expect those summer storms

Summertime in Arizona comes with some of the hottest temperatures in the country with highs reaching up to 118 degrees, such as what happened last June. The dry heat of the summer is followed by the relief of rain during the monsoon.Communities across Arizona cherish and relish the aromas of the monsoon that precede the intense thunderstorms and flash flood warnings.Here is what you need to...

Summertime in Arizona comes with some of the hottest temperatures in the country with highs reaching up to 118 degrees, such as what happened last June. The dry heat of the summer is followed by the relief of rain during the monsoon.

Communities across Arizona cherish and relish the aromas of the monsoon that precede the intense thunderstorms and flash flood warnings.

Here is what you need to know about the monsoon in Arizona.

What is the definition of monsoon?

The word monsoon comes from the Arabic word “mausim,” which means season. This is a fitting way to describe the period when rainstorms are more prevalent in the desert.

"A monsoon is a large-scale change in overall weather pattern," explained Marvin Percha, meteorologist at the National Weather Service.

A couple of factors are at play in order to create the kind of conditions for rain. The two big ones are the direction of the wind and moisture and daytime heating.

A shift in wind direction from the south to the southeast occurs in the summer. The moisture from the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico creates streams to the north. Combine this with the heat from the day in Arizona, which creates rising air or low pressure, and the conditions are set for monsoon storms.

These storms are really important as water is a scarce resource in the Southwest. The weather service approximates "40 to 50 percent of the annual precipitation falls during monsoon season."

When is Arizona's monsoon?

The Arizona monsoon season starts approximately in June and continues through September. Since 2008, the established dates from the National Weather Service are from June 15 through Sept. 30.

These dates only suggest the higher possibility of storms, so don't be confused when it doesn't rain between these dates.

Before the weather service established these dates, the start of the season was signaled by three consecutive days of average dew point temperatures of 55 degrees or higher. The dew point means the temperature to which air must be cooled to become saturated with water vapor. This is what forms clouds.

How much rain did Arizona get during the 2021 monsoon?

Last year's monsoon was the 20th wettest on record for Arizona. The average rainfall during the monsoon months was 7.93 inches. Most of this rainfall occurred in the mountainous regions of the state.

In an interview with The Arizona Republic, Michael Crimmins, a climate science researcher and extension specialist at the University of Arizona, said, "This particular monsoon hit Tucson and Phoenix really hard, which is where most of the people live in the state."

What are the predictions for the monsoon in 2022?

This year, the National Weather Service predicts that Arizona will have a very active monsoon.

In Phoenix, the chances of precipitation are approximately 70%, which is above normal across the Southwest.

What happens during a monsoon?

This desert weather phenomenon can look very differently in an urban environment such as Phoenix, compared with the saguaro-dense hills of the Sonoran Desert.

According to the weather service in Phoenix, high pressure in the atmosphere over northern Mexico strengthens and drifts northward during the summer months, which causes a reversal in the weather pattern across the Southwest.

While storms typically move from west to east in the spring, storms will move from east to west in the summer.

This flow then causes high levels of moisture to gather in the atmosphere across the desert landscape as tropical air moves north, according to the weather service.

With the combination of summer heat and moisture, conditions are more likely to become more favorable for periodic rain showers and thunderstorms.

Typically, the month of July is the rainiest of the year in Phoenix. About 1 to 1.05 inches of rain is expected. That's preceded by the driest month of the monsoon, June, which has an average rainfall of 0.02 inches.

How do residents prepare for monsoons?

Phoenix has put together a website with resources for people to help prepare for the monsoon.

Tips from the site:

Have a question you need answered? Let us know by filling out this form. Reach the reporter at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @raphaeldelag.

Republic reporter Haleigh Kochanski contributed to this article.

Arizona mom arrested for allegedly assaulting teacher in classroom

Investigators have not said what prompted the 46-year-old mother to allegedly attack a science teacher at a charter school in Tucson.TUCSON, Arizona — A Tucson mother was recently arrested for assaulting her child's teacher. It happened last week at an eastside charter school.According to the court document News 4 Tucson recently...

Investigators have not said what prompted the 46-year-old mother to allegedly attack a science teacher at a charter school in Tucson.

TUCSON, Arizona — A Tucson mother was recently arrested for assaulting her child's teacher. It happened last week at an eastside charter school.

According to the court document News 4 Tucson recently obtained, the mother entered the school, went to the classroom and began assaulting the teacher.

The vicious attack by the parent occurred at Da Vinci Tree Academy on May 9.

Over the weekend, the parent was arrested and taken to the Pima County Jail where she appeared in video court.

Angelica Munoz, 46, was charged with aggravated assault of a school employee, aggravated assault victim under 15, and disruption of educational institution.

Pretrial services suggested she should be released to their custody.

The public defender's office agreed.

"She has ties to Tucson," a representative said. "Releasing her to pre-trial services with the condition she can't return to the school should be enough."

The prosecutor disagreed.

"Telling her not to return to the school ground does not solve the issue," the prosecutor said. "It was a pretty violent attack. I'm pretty concerned."

The staff and students at Da Vinci Tree Academy are also concerned. Da Vinci Tree is a charter school with students from kindergarten through 8th grade. There are about 200 students.

The principal released the following statement:

The attack on Monday the 9th against our teacher Middle School Science Teacher happened around 8:16 AM right after our normal student drop-off time. As a community school, we always welcome parents in to their children’s classrooms. When this parent came in, it did not occur to us that Ms. Munoz would have violent intentions towards the teacher or students.

Immediately after the attack on Monday the 9th, we assessed everyone’s injuries and called TPD. As the physical injuries were not serious, we immediately requested the Crisis Response Team’s assistance (for student mental health) and began a full investigation of the attack and the allegations that prompted the attack. We are serious about the safety of our students. Our exhaustive investigation included recorded testimony from students and staff as well as several days of security camera footage from the classroom. Our investigation, which has been turned over to TPD, has found that there was no wrongdoing on the part of the science teacher or any other members of staff.

Our science teacher has been offered all the paid time off he needs to recuperate both mentally and physically from this vicious attack. The Crisis Response Team has offered our students their support and services over the course of several days to help our students process what they witnessed on the 9th.

We would like to thank the heroic actions of our fourth grade teacher Ms. Micaela Trujillo and our two brave eighth graders who stepped in to protect our science teacher during the attack. We would also like to thank TPD and the Crisis Response Team for their fast action and assistance. Finally, we’d like to thank KVOA for shining a light on this very real issue of violence against educators.

News 4 Tucson spoke to parents whose children tried to help the science teacher.

"I understand if a parent has a problem, depending on what the accusations are," parent Mish Draves said. "You know, mama bear comes if you will, but to do it in a classroom full of children, that's irritating."

"It was completely unacceptable and easily avoidable," another parent said. "I mean, it's a school. Why wouldn't you be able to talk to the teachers or the principal?"

The teacher is back in class and the student, whose mother is accused of assault, has not returned to school.

Investigators have not said what caused the attack.

Munoz was released to pre-trial services and posted a $5,000 bond. We reached out to the public defender's office and have not heard back.

Catch up on the latest news and stories on the 12 News YouTube channel. Subscribe today.

'Top Chef' season finale set in Tucson

--> Sorry, we're having issues playing this video.In the meantime, try watching one of the videos below.TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) — A Tucson restaurant will take center stage on a major cooking show next week.The season finale of Bravo's "Top Chef" was filmed at El Charro late last year. The episode, titled "Cactus Makes Perfect," will air at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 26.According to the restaurant, El Charro was chosen because it is the oldest family-run Mexican restaurant in the United States...

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TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) — A Tucson restaurant will take center stage on a major cooking show next week.

The season finale of Bravo's "Top Chef" was filmed at El Charro late last year. The episode, titled "Cactus Makes Perfect," will air at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 26.

According to the restaurant, El Charro was chosen because it is the oldest family-run Mexican restaurant in the United States.

El Charro will hold viewing parties. For more information, please visit their website.

Padma Lakshmi hosts "Top Chef" with head judge Tom Colicchio and judge Gail Simmons.

This show pits chefs from across the country against one another.

"When searching for a finale location, we often look for opportunities to showcase a city which is both a visually stunning destination and a culinary hidden gem,” said Magical Elves Producer Diana Schmedeman, in a statement. “Tucson was all that and more with its majestic mountains, lush deserts and fantastic resorts, all creating an epic environment for a spectacular season finale. Having been introduced to influential culinary figures and local growers who help shape Tucson’s scene, we knew we had found everything needed to help inspire our finalists for a memorable season finale."

The presence of the show is a boon to the Tucson food industry.

"Tucson food history is the fusion of cultures found only here in Southern Arizona, and one of several reasons we were designated as the first UNESCO City of Gastronomy in the country,” said Visit Tucson CEO Felipe Garcia, in a statement. “We are honored Top Chef chose Tucson as the destination for the Season 19 finale and we’re excited to share our rich culinary story with millions of viewers across the country."

Also featured in the episodes are landmarks including Tucson Mountain Park, Pima County Historic Courthouse, JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa, and Tanque Verde Ranch.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Mobile Meals of Southern Arizona in need of volunteers

--> Sorry, we're having issues playing this video.In the meantime, try watching one of the videos below.TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN9) — There's a non-profit in Tucson that is delivering food for those in need. Since 1968, Mobile Meals of Southern Arizona delivers lunch and dinner to those that are unable to get food themselves.Now, the team needs help from the community. The low volunteer numbers during the summer makes it challenging for them to cover all of Southern Arizona. Robert Jensen, the CEO of Mobile Meals, sa...

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TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN9) — There's a non-profit in Tucson that is delivering food for those in need. Since 1968, Mobile Meals of Southern Arizona delivers lunch and dinner to those that are unable to get food themselves.

Now, the team needs help from the community. The low volunteer numbers during the summer makes it challenging for them to cover all of Southern Arizona. Robert Jensen, the CEO of Mobile Meals, said the meals need to be delivered and they're doing their best to get it done. He said volunteers work once a week for two hours. Volunteers get their own delivery routes, which gives them the opportunity to become familiar with the people in the community.

"Volunteers will pick up the food from one of our nine facilities where they are prepared and they will go out to deliver their route of about 8-10 folks," he said. "It's a critical time for us to deliver the meals, there is no option of not delivering the meals, they have to get delivered."

For Scott Stubbs family, the last few years were challenging as he and his sister began taking care of their mom full time. The meals not only help his mom eat, but he said the volunteers keep the residents company.

"The biggest challenge is knowing whether they’ve eaten or if they forget,“ he said. "So this is just a real life saver."

Volunteers take a orientation course and receive their route. And while volunteers use their own cars, they are able to get gas reimbursed. The link to become a volunteer is found here.----

——-Tina Giuliano is a reporter for KGUN 9. She is a native Arizonan and grew up in Scottsdale. Tina is passionate about storytelling and is excited to work telling Tucson's stories. Share your story ideas and important issues with Tina by emailing [email protected] or by connecting on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

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