MediterraneanGrocery Wholesalers in San Jose, CA

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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in San Jose

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in San Jose, CA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of San Jose's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in San Jose. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in San Jose, CA. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery San Jose, CA

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in San Jose,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets San Jose, CA

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store San Jose, CA

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery San Jose, CA

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in San Jose, CA, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores San Jose, CA

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market San Jose, CA

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in San Jose, CA.

 Greek Grocery Store San Jose, CA

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store San Jose, CA

Latest News in San Jose, CA

Closed San Jose Golf Course May Become Housing

East San Jose residents are raising alarms over the potential development of a massive former golf course.September 6, 2022East San Jose residents are raising alarms over the potential development of a massive former golf course.An obscure policy change recommended by the city’s Transportation and Environment Committee could lay the foundation for the 114-acre former Pleasant Hills Golf Course to be built out with housing, commercial space or both.The committee is pushing for changes to the city’s tr...

East San Jose residents are raising alarms over the potential development of a massive former golf course.

September 6, 2022

East San Jose residents are raising alarms over the potential development of a massive former golf course.

An obscure policy change recommended by the city’s Transportation and Environment Committee could lay the foundation for the 114-acre former Pleasant Hills Golf Course to be built out with housing, commercial space or both.

The committee is pushing for changes to the city’s transportation analysis policy to promote greater housing development in parts of the city where it’s not currently allowed. Under current environmental laws, the traffic impacts in certain areas would be too great to permit development without a special exception.

“Exploration of development for this site should be through a city-led process with community engagement instead of developing a policy to make an exception for it,” Green Foothills staff member and District 5 resident Juan Estrada told the committee at a recent meeting. Green Foothills is a nonprofit that focuses on protecting open space in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties.

The golf course, which closed in 2004, is in District 8 near the border of District 5 and is unincorporated county land. It’s designated as private open space and development is not allowed under the city’s current General Plan.

The possible policy change could create a new council roadmap on where and how to override traffic impacts to allow development, even in outlying areas of the city.

Although city staff oppose the idea because it goes against the city’s climate goals and General Plan, Councilmember Raul Peralez pushed for further research in a memo supported by the whole committee.

The intent of the policy change is not to “open the floodgates for cavalier conversions,” the memo said.

Peralez said this is a creative opportunity for the city to analyze ways to convert rare properties for needed housing. Other committee members said they’d only want the council to consider an override for properties that could significantly contribute to solving the housing crisis and the vitality of a neighborhood.

Robert Reese, a member of the District 8 Community Roundtable, said the policy change appears to be aimed directly at the golf course, and city leaders should be clear about that.

“It’s ironic because we hear a lot of discussion about collaboration, inclusivity and equity,” Reese told San José Spotlight. “But here is the Transportation and Environment Committee moving ahead on something that’s essentially urban sprawl.”

Michael Brilliot, San Jose’s deputy director of citywide planning, said while the changes being proposed could apply to other properties in the city, under the guidelines the committee outlined, “the one property that kind of rises to the top is the Pleasant Hills Golf Course.”

The property has been eyed by developers several times in the past, but ultimately no projects have come to fruition there, likely due to a lack of political support, city officials said.

“Pleasant Hills Golf Course has a long and challenging history in our community, and I appreciate the close community attention on any potential development at the site,” District 8 Councilmember Sylvia Arenas told San José Spotlight. She noted there have been several proposals for the land since 2017, but she opposed all of them. “However, each proposal requires close and careful consideration—in the hope that there will one day be a project that lives up to the high expectations of our community.”

Contact Joseph Geha at [email protected] or @josephgeha16 on Twitter.

San José Spotlight is the city's first nonprofit news organization dedicated to independent political and business reporting. Please support our public service journalism by clicking here.

San Jose Candidate Could Be Flouting California Labor Law

Assembly Bill 5 requires many companies to classify workers—including campaign staff—as employees instead of independent contractors.September 6, 2022One San Jose mayoral candidate appears to have violated state labor laws by treating—and paying—his campaign workers as independent contractors instead of employees.San Jose Councilmember Matt Mahan‘s mayoral cam...

Assembly Bill 5 requires many companies to classify workers—including campaign staff—as employees instead of independent contractors.

September 6, 2022

One San Jose mayoral candidate appears to have violated state labor laws by treating—and paying—his campaign workers as independent contractors instead of employees.

San Jose Councilmember Matt Mahan‘s mayoral campaign lists its workers—from volunteer coordinator to deputy field director to campaign manager—as “consultants” in campaign finance disclosure forms, according to analysis by San José Spotlight. Mahan’s campaign hired 18 consultants this year alone, campaign documents show. At least 10 are in high school or college or have recently graduated, according to their LinkedIn profiles. All are paid in rounded figures similar to a flat fee instead of an hourly wage. None own campaign consultancies or firms.

That appears to violate Assembly Bill 5, a state law approved in 2019 that requires many companies to classify workers—including campaign staff—as employees instead of independent contractors. The law, initially targeting rideshare companies, attempted to crack down on employers misclassifying workers to skirt paying benefits, payroll taxes and higher wages.

Mahan is facing off with Santa Clara County Supervisor Cindy Chavez in November to replace Mayor Sam Liccardo. The pair beat out five other candidates—including two of Mahan’s colleagues on the San Jose City Council—in the June primary election.

Campaign consultants, election attorneys and pollsters with their own firms are typically considered independent contractors and exempt from AB 5, according to election law experts such as Sutton Law Firm, a recognized national leader in election and campaign finance law. That firm also consulted for Liccardo’s political action committee which has heavily supported Mahan.

“While consultants, attorneys and pollsters who have their own firms and who work for several political campaigns at the same time will probably be able to avoid the reach of AB 5, campaign staff, phone bank workers, canvassers, petition circulators and other lower-level workers on candidate or ballot measure campaigns will likely be reclassified as employees,” reads a 2019 fact sheet on AB 5 from Sutton Law Firm.

But by reporting all his workers as “consultants”—including high schoolers—Mahan’s campaign can claim them as contractors and potentially avoid providing benefits and paying payroll taxes. The state could penalize and prosecute a campaign or business for misclassifying employees as contractors. The civil penalty for misclassification range between $5,000 and $25,000, according to California law.

Steven Paul Cohn, founder of San Jose-based Advocacy Center for Employment Law, reviewed the situation and believes Mahan’s campaign has misclassified its workers—especially if they’re young and inexperienced.

“If they don’t have a website and they don’t do community outreach to recruit business, they’re not businesses,” Cohn told San José Spotlight. “If it walks like a duck, swims like a duck, quacks like a duck, it might be somebody’s trying to duck their legal obligation here.”

It’s unlikely that all of Mahan’s campaign workers are independent contractors under the law, especially if they are high schoolers and college grads who don’t own a business, said Ruth Silver Taube, a labor and employment law lawyer and San José Spotlight columnist.

“There appears to be a problem,” Silver Taube told San José Spotlight, adding independent contractors in political campaigns are lawyers, certified accountants or people with their own businesses. “It does look like these are just young people without much experience and maybe (Mahan) is telling them what to do. You could definitely say this raises a red flag.”

To be classified as independent contractor under AB 5, Silver Taube said a worker must pass a three-prong test, where they are free from control and direction of their employer, the work is outside of the workplace’s usual course of business and the worker has routinely engaged in an independent trade, occupation or business they are hired to do.

Mahan’s campaign didn’t deny San José Spotlight’s findings and said it’s reviewing its records.

“We take these issues seriously and are re-reviewing all of our filings in an abundance of caution but just like other campaigns, and news blogs, we employ contractors,” campaign manager Matthew Quevedo told San José Spotlight.

Quevedo said the campaign followed advice from its campaign treasurer, Sharareh Rafizadeh. Rafizadeh did not respond to a request for comment.

How others are doing it

Though Quevedo said other local campaigns hire consultants, none reviewed by San José Spotlight relied solely on independent contractors instead of employees.

Chavez’s campaign reported its workers under a salary classification—not as independent contractors.

Chavez’s campaign reports workers’ compensation under “campaign workers’ salaries” in its campaign finance disclosure forms. Other candidates, such as San Jose Councilmember Sylvia Arenas running for the District 1 county supervisor seat, also report workers’ compensation the same way.

San José Spotlight reviewed finance records for six other Silicon Valley campaigns, and none listed the majority of its workers as “consultants.”

Gray area

Huy Tran, a partner at Justice at Work Law Group, said the law still has lots of ambiguity.

“There can be questions, but (AB 5) did not create a black or white standard,” Tran told San José Spotlight. “The key focus of any kind of independent contractor versus employee analysis is always control and what the job is.”

Silver Taube said campaign workers are typically paid by the hour, and those at supervising levels can also take a salary—but workers in positions like coordinator and database manager should be classified as employees regardless. She raised questions about those workers being considered consultants.

“The fact that these workers receive a salary does not make them independent contractors,” she said. “They’d still be an employee and not an independent contractor.”

Contact Tran Nguyen at [email protected] or follow @nguyenntrann on Twitter.

San José Spotlight is the city's first nonprofit news organization dedicated to independent political and business reporting. Please support our public service journalism by clicking here.

Historic, unforgiving western heat wave is peaking and crushing records

A historically severe September heat wave is baking the West, breaking hundreds of records, posing a danger to public health and pushing California’s power grid to the limit. Some records have been shattered by wide margins as the scorching air mass exacerbates the fire danger in the drought-stricken region.California’s Independent System Operator (ISO) says the state’s electric grid is under heavy strain and that rotating outages could occur unless consumers reduce their energy use even more than they have since the...

A historically severe September heat wave is baking the West, breaking hundreds of records, posing a danger to public health and pushing California’s power grid to the limit. Some records have been shattered by wide margins as the scorching air mass exacerbates the fire danger in the drought-stricken region.

California’s Independent System Operator (ISO) says the state’s electric grid is under heavy strain and that rotating outages could occur unless consumers reduce their energy use even more than they have since the heat wave began a week ago.

“This is an extraordinary heat event we are experiencing, and the efforts by consumers to lean in and reduce their energy use after 4 p.m. are absolutely essential,” said Elliot Mainzer, California ISO’s president and CEO, in a news release. The agency, which declared an energy emergency alert, is predicting an all-time historic high demand of 51,033 Megawatts Tuesday afternoon, surpassing their previous record of 50,270 Megawatts on July 24, 2004.

The ISO is urging residents to “pre-cool” their homes to 72 degrees Tuesday and Wednesday mornings, and then turning the thermostat to 78 degrees during peak demand hours between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. It has called for such reductions on seven straight days.

The heat is historic for both its duration and intensity, evidenced by long-standing monthly and all-time records that continue to be toppled. In Sacramento, the downtown district got to 113 degrees Monday, just a degree below an all-time record set on July 17, 1975 and four degrees hotter than the previous September record. Records there date back to 1877.

On Tuesday afternoon, Sacramento is expected to jump to 115 degrees, which would be both a monthly and all-time record as well as only the 11th time in the past 145 years that the city made it to 112 degrees or higher. Fairfield, Calif., on the northeast side of the Bay Area, set an all-time record Monday of 117 degrees.

A whopping 42 million Americans are under excessive heat warnings, including across most of California, northeast Arizona and adjacent southern Nevada. The Great Basin, southern Idaho and western Utah are under heat advisories.

“Extreme heat will significantly increase the potential for heat related illnesses, particularly for those working or participating in outdoor activities,” wrote the National Weather Service. “[There is a] very high risk of heat stress or illness for the entire population.”

Maximiliano Herrera, a world weather historian, called this the “worst September heat wave in Western USA history” on Twitter over the weekend.

Red flag warnings — connoting dangerous fire weather — encapsulate the entirety of Montana in addition to Idaho’s Columbia River Basin, much of Oregon and northern and eastern Washington.

A number of large wildfires have erupted over the last week in California, Oregon, Idaho and Montana. The fast-moving Mill Fire, which erupted on Friday in northern California, killed two people and injured three.

The heat will reach a blistering crescendo into Tuesday as a stagnant high pressure “heat dome” crests overhead. It’s been fending off clouds and rain and diverting the jet stream north into Canada. Beneath it, sinking air and unrelenting sunshine are delivering some of the hottest weather ever observed in the Golden State.

Outside of deserts, the worst of it has been focused in California’s Central Valley. The National Weather Service is explicitly forecasting Sacramento to reach an all-time record high of 115 degrees on Tuesday. In addition to being an all-time record, it would also obliterate what until Monday had been Sacramento’s monthly record for September of 109 degrees.

“Still looking like the ongoing record-setting heat wave will peak today, but dangerous heat will likely persist through the end of the week,” wrote the Weather Service office in Sacramento Tuesday.

The heat traces the spine of California down to the Bay Area and southern California too. San Francisco is expected to hit 99 degrees on Tuesday. While staggeringly hot, Sept. 6, 2020 was hotter by three degrees. Regardless, it’s still two dozen degrees hotter than the average of 75.

Los Angeles will spend the next few days in the mid to upper 80s, but should peak around 90 on Friday. Keep in mind that’s at the airport though — just a few miles inland, highs will hover around 100 to 105 degrees.

Death Valley, Calif. has hit 124 degrees three times in the past five days. It could flirt with 126 on Tuesday, which would tie a world record for September.

The heat has been spilling east too, bringing toasty weather to Denver with record highs in the upper 90s to near 100 projected through Thursday. Salt Lake City — which has set a September record of 104 on Monday — will continue to hover in the low 100s.

The heat will begin to gradually ease on Thursday. Temperatures closer to average will return to much of California over the weekend, although temperatures will remain somewhat above normal over the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rockies.

Around that time, moisture from Hurricane Kay in the Pacific southwest of the Baja Peninsula could begin wafting northward, lowering temperatures and possibly bringing some beneficial rainfall to southern California and even farther north. However, its specific effects on the region are highly uncertain and it could also increase the potential for dry lightning that could increase the fire risk.

While extreme heat events are not caused by climate change, human influence on our atmosphere is making them more frequent, intense and prolonged. It propels already high-end outlier events into record territory.

Breaking records by large margins, the heat wave bears shades of the unprecedented events that torched the Pacific Northwest in June of 2021 and the United Kingdom in July, both of which scientists concluded would have been virtually impossible with human-caused climate change.

Stateside, over the past week, more than 1,141 warm weather records have been set in the U.S. compared to just 36 cold records. If climate change wasn’t a factor, these extremes would roughly balance out.

From California to Montana, hundreds of heat records have been set since Aug. 30, and dozens more are in jeopardy over the coming days.

In addition to calendar day records, multiple locations have set monthly records and even all-time records (the warmest temperature observed in any month). We highlight some of the of most significant here:

Extreme heat takes a toll on Bay Area infrastructure

San Jose, CA - The heat can also take its toll on some of our regional infrastructure that you probably never even think about – at least when everything is operating normally. Things like power transformers, roads, even airport runways can be impacted by extreme temperatures. We don’t often stress the system with this kind of heat this many days in a row...

San Jose, CA - The heat can also take its toll on some of our regional infrastructure that you probably never even think about – at least when everything is operating normally. Things like power transformers, roads, even airport runways can be impacted by extreme temperatures. We don’t often stress the system with this kind of heat this many days in a row – so things can, and do, happen.

At the main Pacific Gas & Electric yard near downtown San Jose, crews were busy loading up transformers onto big trucks. Transformers are one of the weak points in the electrical distribution system especially on hot days when customers are using a lot of power. "We know today is going to be the hottest day, it is going to be the most challenging day for the grid. People are back at work, people are using air conditioning and it is also impacting the entire west, so there is nowhere to find relief and the grid is working extra hard," said Teresa Alvarado, regional vice-president for PG&E for the South Bay and Central Coast regions.

Alvarado said calls to use less electricity during peak demand hours not only helps maintain a steady electrical supply for all customers it can also prevent heat-related stress on sensitive equipment. "It is really transformers. Transformers get overheated. We saw that before in August 2020 there was another heat event we had many transformers go out that we had to replace," Alvarado said.

By 6 p.m. California Governor's Office of Emergency Management blasted alerts to smartphones urging residents to "conserve energy now" to protect public health and safety due to the strain of the heat wave on the state's power grid. The alert reiterated that there could be power interruptions. Residents were asked to turn off or reduce nonessential power as health allows.

At 5:17 p.m., California Independent System Operator declared an Energy Emergency Level 3 Alert. However, they have not yet called for rotating outages.

At Mineta San Jose International Airport there have been no reported problems with the asphalt on the airport runways so far during this heat wave. Airport operations personnel are constantly monitoring the condition of the airfield in case any issues -- heat or otherwise – do crop up. "They go out in trucks. They drive around the runway. They drive around the platforms checking if everything is OK. They check for foreign objects, what is the temperature at the level of the platform?" said Ana State, spokesperson for SJC.

On BART the system is running trains on some of its East Bay lines more slowly than usual. BART says this mostly impacts the Antioch, Warm Springs and Dublin-Pleasanton lines where the hottest temperatures are expected. In June of this year, hot temperatures contributed to a train derailment between the Concord and Pleasant Hill stations. The heat caused the tracks to curve and about 50 passengers were evacuated from the train in this incident.

And Tuesday afternoon, on Southbound Highway 101 just north of the Highway 156 turnoff to San Juan Bautista and Hollister, Caltrans crews are working to repair some raised asphalt in the number two and three lanes. The road work caused long delays in the commute direction as people leave work in Santa Clara County bound for Salinas and the Monterey Bay Area.

San Jose Dedicates Dollars For Flea Market Studies

The vendors at the San Jose Berryessa Flea Market are a step closer to reshaping their future.September 6, 2022The vendors at the San Jose Berryessa Flea Market are a step closer to reshaping their future.Last week, the San Jose City Council approved contracts to hire a consultant and adviser to help vendors who may be displaced from development at the Berryessa Flea Market. The consultant, Estolano Advisors, has a $350,000 contract to conduct three studies on the economic benefits of the flea market, new locations and...

The vendors at the San Jose Berryessa Flea Market are a step closer to reshaping their future.

September 6, 2022

The vendors at the San Jose Berryessa Flea Market are a step closer to reshaping their future.

Last week, the San Jose City Council approved contracts to hire a consultant and adviser to help vendors who may be displaced from development at the Berryessa Flea Market. The consultant, Estolano Advisors, has a $350,000 contract to conduct three studies on the economic benefits of the flea market, new locations and different ways to manage it. The adviser, Braid + Driskell Community Planning, will be paid $125,000 to conduct community outreach that will help determine the size, scope and bylaws of the advisory group.

The advisory group, made up of vendors, flea market landowners, city officials, advocates and experts, will determine how $7.5 million will be spent to best support vendors and open a new flea market.

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“We’re just really excited,” Roberto Gonzalez, president of the Berryessa Flea Market Vendors Association, told San José Spotlight. “These studies will show on paper what the impact and what the worth of the market is and even discover other things that maybe we don’t know personally about the market.”

The San Jose City Council unanimously approved the Berryessa BART Urban Village project in June 2021. A 61.5-acre portion of the flea market site will be rezoned to include up to 3.4 million square feet of mixed-use space and up to 3,450 homes, shrinking the 62-year-old flea market to one-third of its current size. The flea market is guaranteed to stay open until 2024 and may operate longer if development stalls.

Though the city slated the land for development in 2007, the 2021 vote sent shockwaves through vendors, families and customers. The flea market vendors organized protests, went on a hunger strike and worked closely with city staff to ensure some safety nets for the hundreds who could be displaced once development begins.

Their advocacy resulted in a $5 million investment from the Bumb family, which owns the land, and $2 million from the city to help transition vendors to a new location.

The city is spending the first of those funds on the consultant and adviser. The three studies will provide an economic and cultural assessment of the flea market’s benefits to the city, vendors, residents and small businesses over the last six decades. It also includes a recommendation for a new flea market location and if it can be worker-owned. Self-sufficiency is one of the main goals of the Berryessa Flea Market Vendors Association, which represents 450-plus vendors.

The cost of the studies and adviser was higher than initially estimated. When the Bumb family allocated $500,000 in its first tranche of the $5 million in December 2021, the city estimated $350,000 for the studies, with the remaining balance of the $500,000 potentially given as direct stipends to vendors or applied toward other costs. However the $150,000 will instead be used to pay for adviser contract and translation services.

Mayor Sam Liccardo pushed back on one of the studies related to cultural and economic assessment. The $185,000 study accounts for 53% of the consultant’s fee, and Liccardo balked at the cost. He said the money could be better utilized through stipends or by doing a business assessment to attract investors to a new flea market project.

“I don’t see what it is going to help us decide,” Liccardo said. “It’s going to be another study that goes on a shelf, largely a performative act, that does not help the families we’re trying to help.”

City staff said the studies are necessary because they don’t have data around the actual fiscal impact of the market. Knowing that would help attract investors or understand what it takes to open a new market.

Liccardo’s concerns resonated with Councilmember David Cohen, who represents where the flea market is located. Cohen wanted to see if the contract allowed the city to forgo a study and decide at a later date if it was warranted. But the council unanimously approved the consultant contract, which means all three studies are likely to be completed.

The studies are expected to take a year. The advisers will begin community outreach in the coming weeks and create the advisory group charter by the end of the year. The selection of members will occur in early 2023.

Contact Jana Kadah at [email protected] or @Jana_Kadah on Twitter.

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