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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in San Francisco

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in San Francisco, CA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of San Francisco's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in San Francisco. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in San Francisco, CA. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery San Francisco, CA

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in San Francisco,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets San Francisco, CA

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store San Francisco, CA

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery San Francisco, CA

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in San Francisco, CA, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores San Francisco, CA

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market San Francisco, CA

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in San Francisco, CA.

 Greek Grocery Store San Francisco, CA

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store San Francisco, CA

Latest News in San Francisco, CA

Here’s a Look Inside RH’s Elegant New Atrium Restaurant at San Francisco’s Historic Pier 70

It’sIt’s finally here: RH San Francisco, the massive five-story gallery and restaurant taking over 80,000-square-feet of space at Pier 70 opens Thursday, May 12. Not only does the project include a retail store where RH (the company ditched its full “Restoration Hardware” name in 2019) fans can ogle at the company’s luxury home furnishings, but it also encompasses the ...

It’sIt’s finally here: RH San Francisco, the massive five-story gallery and restaurant taking over 80,000-square-feet of space at Pier 70 opens Thursday, May 12. Not only does the project include a retail store where RH (the company ditched its full “Restoration Hardware” name in 2019) fans can ogle at the company’s luxury home furnishings, but it also encompasses the Palm Court Restaurant and two wine bars, each pouring approximately 40 wines by the glass including “limited production offerings from Napa Valley’s renowned small vintners,” according to a press release.

The Palm Court Restaurant sits on the first floor of the historic Bethlehem Steel Building, which the company spent years restoring. Designed by San Francisco architect Frederick H. Meyer (also responsible for the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium) the building was constructed in 1917 and has now been reimagined by RH Chairman and CEO Gary Friedman. To get to the restaurant, diners will pass through hand-forged iron doors and into the buildings octagonal lobby, stepping over the original rose marble floors and past cast-stone walls. Much of the main floor is dedicated to gallery space; the former Bethlehem Steel executive offices have been transformed into a series of rooms showcasing RH Contemporary, a new collection set to launch later this year.

The Palm Court Restaurant occupies the center of the floors’ two wings, under an arching atrium that drenches the space in natural light. The restaurant, adorned in Calacatta gold marble, serves a live-fire menu inspired by Friedman’s global travels — think, wood-grilled avocados and artichokes, whole grilled branzino, and coal roasted sweet potatoes (full menus below). Diners will be able to grab lunch or dinner while seated beneath structural steelwork inspired by the historic shipyard and next to a center fountain surrounded by Medjool date palms. Chandeliers surround the centerpiece: a cooking hearth flanked by two Molteni rotisseries from France. A pair of wine bars, found off each of the restaurant’s two entrances, will pour dozens of still and sparkling wines.

For those not at the gallery to eat and drink, the other four floors — and rooftop garden — will house galleries for each of RH’s collections: on level 2, RH Interiors; on level 3 RH Modern; and on level 4, RH Outdoors, along with the rooftop park complete with retractable glass walls. A lower level will house an RH design firm and atelier, including private client presentation rooms. The gallery and restaurant will be open from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. Reservations can be made on OpenTable.

The Palm Court Restaurant at RH San Francisco, the Gallery at the Historic Bethlehem Steel Building (590 20th Street) opens Thursday, May 12.

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Palm Court Restaurant

590 20th Street, San Francisco , CA 94107 Visit Website

Blood Moon Total Lunar Eclipse 2022: Updated NorCal Viewing Forecast

A lunar eclipse will turn the moon a dazzling red on Sunday night. Here's where and when to watch in Northern California. NORTHERN CALIFORNIA — The first of two total lunar eclipses visible to NorCal residents this year occurs Sunday and Monday and will turn May's full flower moon blood red. Oh, and it's also a supermoon — depending on whom you ask.Whethe...

A lunar eclipse will turn the moon a dazzling red on Sunday night. Here's where and when to watch in Northern California.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA — The first of two total lunar eclipses visible to NorCal residents this year occurs Sunday and Monday and will turn May's full flower moon blood red. Oh, and it's also a supermoon — depending on whom you ask.

Whether you'll be able to see the lunar eclipse, of course, depends on the weather. Along the Northern California coast, clouds are expected to cover anywhere from 37% to 50% of the sky, but further inland, cloud coverage of about 10-20% is expected.

On Sunday night, AccuWeather predicts 11% cloud cover over Livermore and Sacramento, 21% over San Jose, 37% over San Francisco, 40% over San Rafael, 43% over Napa, 44% over Oakland, and 50% over Santa Cruz.

To guarantee the best view, head out to uncrowded inland areas as far away from city lights as possible, like Mt. Diablo, Morgan Territory Regional Preserve, or Folsom Lake State Recreation Area near Sacramento. If you're unable to make it outside, Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles will livestream all phases of the eclipse, weather permitting.

Not everyone will see all three stages of the lunar eclipse. People living in the eastern half of the country and all of South America will see every stage of the lunar eclipse, according to NASA. People in other parts of the United States will see totality but will miss other phases.

Here's what to expect in Northern California.

Moonrise is around 8:06 p.m. Sunday. It's worth taking a look because, 1) rising full moons are pretty and 2) some celestial experts call it a supermoon (a bit more about that later).

The total eclipse will begin at 8:29 p.m. PDT before coming to an end at 9:54 p.m. PDT. The moon will fully exit the eclipse phase at 10:55 p.m. PDT.

The partial eclipse starts at around 8:05 p.m. PDT. The face of the moon will get gradually darker until totality peaks at 12:12 a.m. Monday. Totality will last about 1 hour and 25 minutes, and the eclipse is over at 1:55 a.m. The moon will continue to shine until dawn, setting at 5:38 a.m.

Lunar eclipses only happen during a full moon, when the moon is opposite the sun in its orbit of Earth. In a full moon, the sun fully illuminates the face of the moon. During an eclipse, the entire moon enters the darkest part of Earth's shadow.

In a penumbral eclipse, the moon passes through the outer part of Earth's shadow, only slightly dimming the surface of the moon. In a partial eclipse, the moon enters Earth's darkest shadow, the umbra, causing some of the moon to darken significantly.

"Blood moon" is a descriptive rather than technical astronomical term, though The Old Farmer's Almanac says the phrase is "hyped" and that a fully eclipsed moon is orange, or copper-colored like a penny, but not blood red. The moon's color at totality can also vary depending upon the amount of dust, volcanic ash or other particulate matter in the atmosphere, and because of cloud cover, according to Space.com.

Weather permitting, the lunar eclipse is worth staying up late to watch, even if it isn't a supermoon.

"Supermoon" isn't an astronomical term either, but rather one coined by astrologer Richard Nolle, who calls a full or new moon a supermoon when it is at 90 percent of its closest point, or perigee, to Earth. Under Nolle's definition, four full moons meet supermoon criteria: a new or "stealth" moon on Jan. 14, full moons on June 14 and July 13, and a new moon on Dec. 23.

However, Fred Espenak, a retired NASA astrophysicist who worked at the Goddard Space Flight Center, uses slightly different criteria. He says the May flower moon is the first of four supermoons in 2022. He also counts the June 14 and July 13 full moons as supermoons. Unlike Nolle, Espenak says the Aug. 12 full moon will be a supermoon (bad news for Perseids meteor shower fans, because the supermoon and the peak of the summertime favorite coincide).

Either way, a supermoon isn't bigger, and it doesn't even look that much bigger in the sky when compared to a normal full moon. While it can look larger when it's close to the horizon, that's due to "the circuitry in your brain," according to Universe Today which explained "it's an optical illusion … so well known that it has its own name: Moon illusion."

Although most often called the full flower moon, the May full moon is also known as the corn planting moon and the milk moon in the United States. In Asia, it is known as the Vesak Festival Moon because it corresponds with Buddha Jayanti or Buddha Purnima, a Buddhist holiday that marks the birth, enlightenment and death of Gautama Buddha.

The actual date of the Vesak festival depends on the calendar used in different countries and regions, but generally falls on or near the day of the May full moon.

If you miss the eclipse this month, the second 2022 total lunar eclipse on Nov. 8 will be visible across the Americas, Oceania and Asia.

Michelin-Starred Crew Opening Hand-Roll Sushi Bar In San Francisco

Launching Wednesday in the Mission District, the"Handroll Project" to feature hand-held sushi rolls with smoked hamachi, salmon roe & more.SAN FRANCISCO, CA — The owners of Hina Yakitori and Michelin-starred Ju-Ni in San Francisco are opening their newest Japanese restaurant — the Handroll Project — on May 18 in the former AL's Deli space in the Mission District.The fast-casual eatery from Chef Geoffrey Lee and restaurant partner Tan Truong will feature hand-rolled, hand-held sushi with importe...

Launching Wednesday in the Mission District, the"Handroll Project" to feature hand-held sushi rolls with smoked hamachi, salmon roe & more.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — The owners of Hina Yakitori and Michelin-starred Ju-Ni in San Francisco are opening their newest Japanese restaurant — the Handroll Project — on May 18 in the former AL's Deli space in the Mission District.

The fast-casual eatery from Chef Geoffrey Lee and restaurant partner Tan Truong will feature hand-rolled, hand-held sushi with imported seafood and nori, small plates and a playful beverage menu including sake, wine, Japanese beers, green tea, citrus-y Calpico soda and Fentimans' ginger beer.

Lee's chef-crafted, hand-held sushi rolls will come in 10 varieties, including: salmon & sesame; spicy tuna; spicy kani; smoked hamachi; Chef's Poke Hand Roll (chef's choice poke, ikura); creamy scallop; and toro takuan (fatty tuna, pickled radish, shiso, negi), according to the restaurateurs.

Diners can select from rolled sets of five, seven or ten, plus indulge in Lee's specials, including A5 Wagyu (garlic chips, shiso, chives), Smoked Uni & Ikura (smoked hokkaido uni, ikura) and Ikura & Ankimo (salmon roe, monkfish liver pate).

As he does with his restaurants Ju-Ni and Hina Yakitori, Lee will work with such select purveyors as Sakasyu, which imports fish and nori directly from Tsukiji in Japan.

Alice Lee, from Berkeley's Fish & Bird Sousaku Izakaya, was named Handroll Project's general and beverage manager. Her drink selections will feature a high-end sake from Kuboto, the "Manju" Junmai Daiginjo, plus the Junmai Ginjo and Oka "Snow Angel" Nigori.

The 16-seat, Handroll Project took over the space formerly occupied by AL's Deli, an Israeli street food-inspired sandwich joint that closed in 2020. Now, the remodeled sushi site includes dual counters and a mural from local artist The Apexer.

Handroll Project, at 598 Guerrero St., will be open 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays — initially for walk-ins only or via Yelp waitlist. Expansion to lunch hours and takeout (with DIY hand roll kits) planned for the summer.

Follow this link for more restaurant details.

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Study of Pregnant Women Finds Increasing Chemical Exposure

Latinas Had Higher Levels of Many Potentially Dangerous ChemicalsA national study that enrolled a highly diverse group of pregnant women over 12 years found rising exposure to chemicals from plastics and pesticides that may be harmful to development.Many of the chemicals that the women had been exposed to were replacement chemicals: new forms of chemicals that have been banned or phased out that may be just as harmful as the ones they replaced. The study also found many women had been exposed to neonicotinoids, a kind of pestic...

Latinas Had Higher Levels of Many Potentially Dangerous Chemicals

A national study that enrolled a highly diverse group of pregnant women over 12 years found rising exposure to chemicals from plastics and pesticides that may be harmful to development.

Many of the chemicals that the women had been exposed to were replacement chemicals: new forms of chemicals that have been banned or phased out that may be just as harmful as the ones they replaced. The study also found many women had been exposed to neonicotinoids, a kind of pesticide that is toxic to bees.

Researchers measured 103 chemicals, mostly from pesticides, plastics, and replacement chemicals for BPA and phthalates, using a new method that captured dozens of chemicals or chemical traces from a single urine sample.

More than 80 percent of the chemicals were found in at least one of the women in the study, and more than a third of the chemicals were found in a majority of the participants. The study also found that some of these chemicals were present in higher amounts than seen in earlier studies.

Our findings make clear that the number and scope of chemicals in pregnant women are increasing during a very vulnerable time of development for both the pregnant person and the fetus.

Tracey J. Woodruff, PhD

“This is the first time we’ve been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women – not just identify chemicals,” said Tracey J. Woodruff, PhD, professor and director of the UC San Francisco Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment and co-director of the UCSF EaRTH Center, and the senior author of the study, appearing online May 10, 2022, in Environmental Science & Technology. “Our findings make clear that the number and scope of chemicals in pregnant women are increasing during a very vulnerable time of development for both the pregnant person and the fetus.”

Prenatal exposure to industrial chemicals can come from air, food, water, plastics, and other industrial and consumer products. Although these chemicals could be harmful to pregnancy and child development, few of these chemicals are routinely monitored in people.

The study included 171 women from California, Georgia, Illinois, New Hampshire, New York, and Puerto Rico who are part of the National Institutes of Health Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes program. About one-third (34%) were white, 40% were Latina, 20% were Black, and the remaining 6% were from other or multiple groups.

The study found higher exposures for non-white women, those with lower educational attainment, or who were single or had been exposed to tobacco. But Latinas had especially high levels of parabens, which are used as preservatives, as well as phthalates and bisphenols, which are used in plastics.

“While pesticides and replacement chemicals were prevalent in all women, we were surprised to find that Latinas had substantially higher levels of parabens, phthalates and bisphenols,” said Jessie Buckley, PhD, associate professor of environmental health and engineering, as well as of epidemiology, at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and first author of the study. “This could be the result of higher exposures to products with chemicals, such as processed foods or personal care products,” Buckley said.

Authors: The full list of authors is available in the paper.

Funding: Research reported in this publication was supported by the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program, Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health, under Award Numbers U2COD023375 (Coordinating Center), U24OD023382 (Data Analysis Center), U24OD023319 (PRO Core), U2CES026542 (HHEAR), and UH3OD023251, UH3OD023272, UH3OD023275, UH3OD023287, UH3OD023290, UH3OD023318, UH3OD023342, UH3OD023349, UH3OD023347, UH3OD023365 (cohort grantees).

One Region Of California Emerges As State’s Covid Hotspot: “We’ve Got A Lot Of Virus Circulating Now. And It’s On Its Way Up”

“We’ve got a lot of virus circulating now. And it’s on its way up,” said Santa Clara County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody at a press briefing earlier this week.While case numbers are going up across the state, one region’s transmission levels are much higher than the rest: The Bay Area. The CDC’s color-coded “County Tracker” tool ...

“We’ve got a lot of virus circulating now. And it’s on its way up,” said Santa Clara County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody at a press briefing earlier this week.

While case numbers are going up across the state, one region’s transmission levels are much higher than the rest: The Bay Area. The CDC’s color-coded “County Tracker” tool indicates that, while the rest of the state is at the green or “Low” level of transmission, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Marin, San Mateo and San Francisco Counties have all moved into the yellow, or “Medium” level of community spread. See map below.

By contrast, the state’s largest metropolis is still in the green, according to the CDC. Cases are rising in Los Angeles, from 2,484 last Wednesday to 2,997 today, a jump of 20% in the past week, but not nearly so fast as they are in the Bay Area. The 7-day average number of daily new cases reported in L.A. increased to 2,532 today.

While data for San Francisco County cases in incomplete for the past few days, the 7-day average of new cases, last updated a week ago on the county Covid dashboard, was already about even with the high point of last summer’s Delta wave at 283 vs. 311 on August 2.

The major difference between the Bay Area and L.A. — in terms of downstream impact and impact on the county’s CDC raking — is hospitalizations. While hospitalizations of residents with Covid have only crept up about 1.5% in Los Angeles in the past week, that metric in San Francisco County over the past seven days have jumped 20%.

San Francisco now has an average of 40 new daily cases per 100,000 residents, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. That’s the second-highest rate in the state, behind only Santa Cruz County, which is at 43 per 100,000.

Test positivity rates show a similar divide. In L.A., the 7-day average test positivity rate of 2.5% is actually below that of the state-at-large, which comes in at 4.1%. Contrast that with the Bay Area counties: San Mateo at 6.4%, San Francisco at 9% and Marin at 9.1%.

Among the factors driving cases and hospitalizations is the rise of Omicron subvariant BA.2.12.1, thought to be 25% more transmissible than Omicron BA.2. The variant began on the East Coast and has slowly risen in the West. It accounts for fully 66% of cases in the three-state region of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, where it is also driving a surge in hospitalizations.

In California, BA.2.12.1 — and sister lineage BA.2.12.2 — is still only responsible for 15% of new cases. Los Angeles County officials say that, for the week ending April 16, BA.2.12.1 accounts for just 8% of positive sequenced specimens. While numbers are not readily available for the Bay Area, it’s a good bet the prevalence of BA.2.12.1 is much, much higher.

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