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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Sacramento

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Sacramento, CA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market – to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Sacramento’s leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you’re looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Sacramento. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it’s easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Sacramento, CA. We’re proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We’re here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That’s why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Sacramento,
what are we talking about?

Feta Cheese

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

Baba Ganoush

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

Baklava

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Sacramento, CA, you won’t want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it’s no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It’s best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party – you’re almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

Shawarma

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason – this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Sacramento, CA.

Hummus

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That’s because it’s considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there’s one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you’re looking to make some positive changes in your life, this “diet” is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures’ foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke – especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery – we’re always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It’s refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn’t have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don’t start with meats and sweets.

4.

They’re tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you’re essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That’s great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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Latest News in Sacramento

Want a California state job? Check out this list of interesting Sacramento posts

The state of California is hiring in the new year.Whether you’re looking for a job with the Department of Fish and Wildlife, State Lands Commission, Department of Water Resources, Department of Transportation, Department of Education or Folsom State Prison — there’s a job for you.Remember, the California Department of Human Resources implemented COVID-19 testing of all unvaccinated sta...

The state of California is hiring in the new year.

Whether you’re looking for a job with the Department of Fish and Wildlife, State Lands Commission, Department of Water Resources, Department of Transportation, Department of Education or Folsom State Prison — there’s a job for you.

Remember, the California Department of Human Resources implemented COVID-19 testing of all unvaccinated state employees working on site as an additional health and safety standard. Those who seek exemption of testing and facial covering must provide proof of vaccination.

State jobs are known for offering great benefits and enrollment in the nation’s largest state public pension plan. Many of the following jobs have specific requirements, which are linked. Sift through the new Sacramento County-based jobs available on the CalCareers website, posted this week, as of Jan. 20:

Department: Fish and Wildlife

Salary: $15.68 to $18.60 per hour

The scientific aid assists with the administration, facilitation and development of human-wildlife interaction studies.

The job posting closes Jan. 30.

Associate boundary determination officer | permanent full-time

Department: State Lands Commission

Salary: $8,756 to $10,956 per month

Under the direction of the boundary determination officer supervisor, the associate boundary determination officer performs the more difficult or complex boundary assignments. The worker will also prepare maps and boundary descriptions and investigate tidal, lake and river characteristics.

The job posting closes Feb. 18.

Accounting officer (specialist) | permanent full-time

Department: Transportation

Salary: $4,701 to $5,885 per month

Under the direct supervision of an accounting administrator, the worker is responsible for independently completing duties required for providing lead function over processing statewide travel expenses and other employee claims.

The job posting closes Feb. 3.

Clinical social worker - Folsom State Prison | limited term part-time

Department: California Correctional Health Services

Salary: $3,364.50 to $4,603.50 per month

The clinical social worker conducts assessments and summarizes case information to use in diagnosis, treatment and dispositional release.

The job posting closes Feb. 3.

Custodian | permanent full-time

Department: General services

Salary: $2,885 to $3,574 per month

Under supervision of the custodian supervisor, the custodian is responsible for the daily cleaning of their assigned building.

The job posting closes Feb. 3.

Department: Education

Salary: $7,354.00 - $9,205.00 per month

The education programs consultant works independently providing technical assistance and monitoring special education compliance in assigned areas.

The job posting closes Jan. 31.

Engineer | permanent full-time

Department: Water Resources

Salary: $5,849 to $10,956 per month

The incumbent will join a dynamic team to award and manage local agency grant funding to execute flood risk reduction projects statewide. The incumbent will also support the management and implementation of multiple programs from the concept to the completion stage through solicitation, review, evaluation, and selection of new project proposals.

The job posting closes Jan. 31.

Sacramento weekend guide: Build a succulent garden at a local brewery, hike or bird watch

Winter storms are so last year — at least for right now. With sunnier days and warmer weather in store, it’s time to get outside and enjoy the outdoors.Whether you want to be one with nature by having long walks outside or by building your own succulent garden, Sacramento has some fun, COVID-19 safe activities for you.From the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area to Con...

Winter storms are so last year — at least for right now. With sunnier days and warmer weather in store, it’s time to get outside and enjoy the outdoors.

Whether you want to be one with nature by having long walks outside or by building your own succulent garden, Sacramento has some fun, COVID-19 safe activities for you.

From the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area to Consumnes River Preserve, nature lovers can get their steps in and take in beautiful views while doing it. According to forecasts, the weekend will be mostly sunny with temperatures around 60 degrees — perfect to keep cool and breath in what mother nature has to offer.

If you plan on hiking this weekend, make sure to do your research and find a trail that fits your experience level and bring water, sunscreen, snacks and friends.

1103 North B St., Sacramento

The Sacramento Tree Foundation is planting trees in front of a business in the River District on Saturday. You can join the organization and help make the community more welcoming, energy-efficient and livable.

Tools, supplies and hands-on training will be provided. Attendees are encouraged to be fully vaccinated, and must wear face coverings at all times and maintain social distancing.

7485 Rush River Dr., Ste 650, Sacramento

On Sunday, you can learn about succulents and build your own terrarium garden at Device Brewing Company. You don’t need a green thumb and supplies will be provided with your ticket.

Masks are required for this event and social distancing guidelines will be in place.

As you might already know, it’s the season of crows in Sacramento. If you’re tired of seeing these jet-black creatures and prefer seeing some wild turkey, black-neck stilt or maybe a western kingbird, go birding at the American River Parkway.

The Sacramento Audubon Society has a map of top birdwatching spots on the parkway. If you’re lucky, you might find other wildlife on your trip too.

Sacramento City Council (again) denies Crocker Village gas station. Is 7-year saga over?

The Sacramento City Council Tuesday again rejected a special permit for a controversial Curtis Park gas station — potentially putting an end to the seven-year saga.The item went to the council Tuesday, the result of a court-ordered appeal from Crocker Village developer Paul Petrovich’s lawsuit.But despite a recommendation from city staff to approve the gas station, just south of the Crocker Village Saf...

The Sacramento City Council Tuesday again rejected a special permit for a controversial Curtis Park gas station — potentially putting an end to the seven-year saga.

The item went to the council Tuesday, the result of a court-ordered appeal from Crocker Village developer Paul Petrovich’s lawsuit.

But despite a recommendation from city staff to approve the gas station, just south of the Crocker Village Safeway near Sutterville Road, the council again voted it down. The vote was 7-0, with Councilwoman Katie Valenzuela and Councilman Jay Schenirer recusing themselves.

Valenzuela recused herself because she was active in organizing against the project before she was a council member, she said. Schenirer, who represented Curtis Park until recently, recused himself due to a court order, he said.

“I’ve been waiting six years for this,” Petrovich said on video during the virtual council meeting. “This has been an emotional journey for me ... I’ve been to hell and back.”

The saga began in 2015 when the council denied a special permit to allow Petrovich to build the gas station within the new housing and retail development. Petrovich sued the city claiming that vote was due to prejudice against him. In 2020, a state appeals court ruled the council did not give Petrovich a fair hearing, prompting Tuesday’s redo.

The council heard more than two hours of presentations and public comments on both sides. But despite the years that had passed, and the addition of new council members, the result was essentially the same.

Rick Jennings, who now represents Curtis Park due to redistricting, said the gas station was too close to the Sacramento City College light rail station and was inconsistent with the city’s long-term planning document called the general plan.

“An auto-oriented use around the transit station would draw additional traffic,” Jennings said. “And this is inconsistent with the city’s policy of discouraging auto-oriented uses.”

The other council members echoed similar issues, as well as concerns about the gas station’s impact on the environment. Some callers expressed concerns it would cause long lines and congestion, similar to the Costco in North Sacramento.

Petrovich said the Safeway gas station would be much smaller than the one at Costco. He said without the gas station, the Safeway store might need to close. While the store had increased sales during the start of the coronavirus pandemic, now that people are getting groceries delivered from non-unionized grocery stores, the store’s sales are down, Petrovich said.

After several members had spoken out against the gas station, Petrovich threatened additional litigation.

“The council’s purview here is to address the four points of appeal,” Petrovich said during the meeting. “Those four points of appeal did not include general plan inconsistency. It would be another writ of mandate (lawsuit) if the decision to deny this fuel center is based on general plan noncompliance.”

Petrovich did not respond directly to a question Wednesday about any additional planned litigation.

This story was originally published January 19, 2022 10:41 AM.

'It's the end of our song': Sacramento-area music venue The Boardwalk is shutting down after 35 years

ORANGEVALE, Calif. —A prominent venue in the Sacramento music scene is closing its doors after 35 years, a decision that its owner said she made with a heavy heart.The Boardwalk in Orangevale announced the decision on its Facebook page, blaming a number of factors, including the pandemic, “dwindling crowds and mounting financial pressure.”The venue will go up for sale and also look for buyers for its collection of more than 300 signed guitars that line The Boardwalk’s walls and ce...

ORANGEVALE, Calif. —

A prominent venue in the Sacramento music scene is closing its doors after 35 years, a decision that its owner said she made with a heavy heart.

The Boardwalk in Orangevale announced the decision on its Facebook page, blaming a number of factors, including the pandemic, “dwindling crowds and mounting financial pressure.”

The venue will go up for sale and also look for buyers for its collection of more than 300 signed guitars that line The Boardwalk’s walls and ceilings.

The Boardwalk has been a mainstay for many top local and national touring acts over the years.

“You can literally stand feet from your favorite musician,” owner Sandy Silk told KCRA 3’s Melanie Wingo about the venue.

“The Boardwalk is loud and in your face,” she said, though Megadeth once did an acoustic set there, she noted.

Musician Larissa Bryski said, “it was mind-blowing to be able to walk into a club like that and see live music up close and personal in such a raw rock and roll atmosphere."

She first attended shows there as a college student before setting her sights on performing at the venue.

“The Boardwalk was where everybody wanted to play,” she said. “It was a local, mom-and-pop place where you could go hear live music and really, really, really good live rock and roll.”

The venue’s co-owner, Silk’s husband Mark Earl, died a little over a year ago.

“It’s the end of our song,” Silk said. “It was Mark and Sandy. If you look at the guitars they’re all signed Mark and Sandy. We were always together.”

Facing her own health challenges and trying to stay open during the pandemic without Mark by her side has been hard, she said.

“I want to leave it on a high note,” she said of putting the business up for sale. “ I don’t want to leave when The Boardwalk is in dirt and it’s not doing good. I want it to be in a good enough place where it can be someone else’s place and they can continue the music.”

She said that she hoped to come to another show one day at the place, though for now she’s grateful for all those who have supported her business over the years.

“I don’t know how to say thank you enough,” she said.

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How Joan Didion’s Sacramento childhood shaped her life, and her take on California

SACRAMENTO —The tennis shoes, dirty and worn to their foam core around the ankles, appeared on the front lawn of Joan Didion’s childhood home a few months ago — a talisman of grief to an author who knew it intimately.On top was a note quoting “The Year of Magical Thinking,” in cursive script written by a hand that seemed shaky.“I kept his shoes. He would need them, if he was to come back,” it read.Danielle Anderson, who moved into Didion’s elegant mansion in Sacramen...

SACRAMENTO —

The tennis shoes, dirty and worn to their foam core around the ankles, appeared on the front lawn of Joan Didion’s childhood home a few months ago — a talisman of grief to an author who knew it intimately.

On top was a note quoting “The Year of Magical Thinking,” in cursive script written by a hand that seemed shaky.

“I kept his shoes. He would need them, if he was to come back,” it read.

Danielle Anderson, who moved into Didion’s elegant mansion in Sacramento earlier this year, took it as “an indicator to us that this house is something special to Sacramento.”

Thursday, as a cold rain gave way to glowering gray skies, more offerings appeared on Anderson’s steps: a white poinsettia in a red pot, three bouquets of the supermarket variety, and later, a vase of yellow roses.

All were left to honor the acclaimed writer who passed away, a daughter of the Capitol City whose relationship with it was knotty. She was at times nostalgic of Sacramento, and at times homesick for a tight-knit community. But her dreams didn’t fit on her wraparound porch, or even in the fields and ranches that defined this agricultural valley in her youth, or under the dome of the state building a few blocks away.

“She had a complicated relationship with Sacramento. She also had a real love for it,” said Rob Turner, co-editor of Sactown Magazine, who interviewed Didion in 2011. “It perhaps was constraining while she was here, she had her eyes set on bigger things.”

It is a place Didion outgrew, but that never outgrew her. At least once a week, said Anderson, someone knocks on the front door or stops her husband’s yardwork to ask if this was Didion’s old house.

For many, Didion herself was evidence there is more to this always-trying town than meets the eye.

“For the longest time, I was one of those kids that always wanted to leave Sacramento,” said Harrison Daly, 23, standing at the cash register of the Avid Reader, a local bookshop where Didion‘s books were doing brisk business Thursday. Daly began changing his mind about the city after he found a copy of “Democracy,” Didion’s fourth novel, at a library book sale.

Her ability to capture grief touched him and gave him a sense of pride that Sacramento turned out such talent, an indicator of an underground “cultural boom even though it appears to be quiet,” he said.

Didion was born in Sacramento on Dec. 5, 1934, and if she had grown up in San Francisco or Los Angeles, she would have formed a much different take on California than she did in the Central Valley. Her ancestors had arrived in Sacramento in the mid-1800s. Stories of the pioneer experience shaped her childhood and were a focus of “Run River,” her first novel. She later lamented that book as contributing to the California myth, but it provided a glimpse of how Sacramento was transforming from a farm hub and sleepy state capital into the sprawling region of 2.3 million people it is now.

Didion spent the last two years of high school in a wealthy corner known as Poverty Ridge, so named because of the city’s early history of devastating floods. Before big levees were built along the American River and muddy Sacramento River, the two waterways would overtop their banks, forcing poverty-stricken Sacramentans to escape inundation by converging on one of the town’s few hills.

Wealthy families such as the McClatchys — owners of the Sacramento Bee — would soon learn that Poverty Ridge was a safe spot to build their mansions. Didion’s father, Frank Didion, purchased one of these houses in the 1940s — a nearly 5,000-square-foot blend of Colonial Revival and Prairie School styles — at the corner of 22nd and T Streets, moving the family from a smaller home a few blocks away.

For Didion, the city’s rivers were her constant companion, an escape rather than a fear. She’d raft them and swim in them and later dissect hydrologic reports to better understand how humans had replumbed them. These studies shaped her later writings — such as the 2003 book “Where I Was From” — that debunked myths about Californians being self-reliant. As she noted, California was dependent on the federal government for flood control, irrigation and so many other services.

She lived in the grand “Didion House” for just two years, before she graduated from C. K. McClatchy High School in 1952 and departed for UC Berkeley. While at McClatchy, she wrote for the Bee’s rival, the Sacramento Union, filling a role typically relegated to women during that era. It gave her more of a window into the region’s upper crust, which she portrayed in “Run River.”

“I was working at the society desk. I did weddings. I didn’t cover weddings, I just wrote about them,” she told Turner in his Sactown Magazine interview. “I wouldn’t call that reporting.... They would send you accounts of what the bridesmaids were going to wear and stuff like that, and you would write it up.”

For many current McClatchy students, Didion is a footnote among other illustrious graduates, including retired Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and California Supreme Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye.

But for former student Annabelle Long, who like Didion left Sacramento for UC Berkeley and aspires to be a writer, there is pride and kinship in sharing a hometown, and leaving it. She didn’t read Didion until she took a course on the 1970s in college, where “The White Album” was required reading. It began her a “crash course” on other Didion works and an understanding of a Sacramento that sometimes can’t shake the chip on its shoulder, compared with several of California’s other major cities.

“I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about her Sacramento versus my Sacramento,” said Long, who just finished an essay about her own youth in the same neighborhoods Didion frequented. “I don’t think Sacramento is all that successful in being the cultural place it tries to be. Sacramento tries very hard and I think that’s the same Sacramento that she wrote about as well.”

After departing for UC Berkeley, Didion occasionally returned to Sacramento — to see her parents or take her late daughter Quintana to see rivers and levees and other quirks of her old stomping grounds. She was distantly involved in some local real estate dealings. But in her 2011 interview, she said she hadn’t been back to Sacramento since the 1990s, and there is no record of her embracing local attempts to honor her literary career and celebrity, including being inducted into the California Hall of Fame in 2014.

It is not entirely clear why, past her teens, Didion so detached herself from Sacramento unlike, say, Greta Gerwig, who produced a love letter to her hometown in the 2017 film “Lady Bird.” But the city was a key character in several of her books.

In “Slouching Towards Bethlehem,” she wrote of its significance not just to her but to California.

“That is what I want to tell you about: what it is like to come from a place like Sacramento,” she wrote. “If I could make you understand that, I could make you understand California and perhaps something else besides, for Sacramento is California.”

As darkness fell on the flowers, Anderson, who lives where Didion once dreamed, contemplated what she would do with the living tributes. She wanted to leave them out where others could see them, share in their meaning and grief. But it was too sad to think of them dying there in the cold. She decided she would bring them in on Christmas, arrange them in a vase, and give them a place of honor.

And, she says, she will then do a toast — to Didion, her life, and the beauty of strong women.

Chabria reported from Sacramento, Leavenworth from Berkeley.

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