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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Sacramento

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Sacramento, CA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Sacramento's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Sacramento. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Sacramento, CA. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Sacramento, CA

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Sacramento,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Sacramento, CA

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Sacramento, CA

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Sacramento, CA

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Sacramento, CA, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Sacramento, CA

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Sacramento, CA

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Sacramento, CA.

 Greek Grocery Store Sacramento, CA

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Sacramento, CA

Latest News in Sacramento, CA

Announcement of Availability of a Second Draft Technical Support Document for Proposed Public Health Goals for Haloacetic Acids in Drinking Water

The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the release of a second draft document for public review describing proposed Public Health Goals (PHGs) for the five regulated haloacetic acids (HAAs) found in drinking water as a result of disinfection methods: monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), and dibromoacetic acid (DBA).A PHG is the level of a drinking water contaminant at which ad...

The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the release of a second draft document for public review describing proposed Public Health Goals (PHGs) for the five regulated haloacetic acids (HAAs) found in drinking water as a result of disinfection methods: monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), and dibromoacetic acid (DBA).

A PHG is the level of a drinking water contaminant at which adverse health effects are not expected to occur from a lifetime of exposure. The California Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996[1] requires OEHHA to develop PHGs based exclusively on public health considerations.[2] PHGs published by OEHHA are considered by the State Water Resources Control Board in setting drinking water standards (Maximum Contaminant Levels, or MCLs) for California.[3]

The second draft technical support document, available for download below, presents the scientific information available on the toxicity of the HAAs and the calculation of the proposed PHGs. The proposed PHGs of 0.2 parts per billion (ppb) for DCA, 0.1 ppb for TCA, and 0.03 ppb for DBA are based on carcinogenicity and are set at a level of risk of one additional cancer case per one million persons exposed over a 70-year lifetime. The proposed PHGs of 53 ppb for MCA and 25 ppb for MBA are based on noncancer health effects. The draft document also presents health-protective drinking water concentrations for noncancer health effects for DCA, TCA, and DBA.

The draft technical support document was originally released for a 90-day public comment period in January 2020, and underwent an external scientific peer review that was completed in September 2020. The draft technical support document has been revised per public and peer review comments and is being released for a second public comment period that begins August 19, 2022 and ends September 18, 2022.

The public is encouraged to submit written comments via OEHHA’s website, rather than in paper form. Comments may be submitted electronically through the following link: https://oehha.ca.gov/comments.

Hardcopy comments may be mailed, faxed, or hand-delivered to the address below. Any written comments concerning this draft PHG document, regardless of the form or method of transmission, must be received by the PHG program on September 18, 2022 to be considered.

Following the second public comment period, OEHHA will evaluate all the comments received and revise the document as appropriate. After any subsequent revisions, the final document will be posted on the OEHHA website along with responses to the external peer review comments and to major comments received during the two public comment periods.

If you would like to receive further information on this announcement or have questions, please contact Hermelinda Jimenez at [email protected] or at (916) 324-7572. Written inquiries can also be addressed to:

Pesticide and Environmental Toxicology Branch Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment California Environmental Protection Agency P.O. Box 4010, MS-12B Sacramento, California 95812-4010 Attention: PHG Program

[1] Codified at Health and Safety Code, section 116270 et. seq.

Driest, wettest, hottest: Sacramento’s troubling trifecta of extremes

California’s capital experienced its hottest day ever observed Tuesday — hitting an unprecedented 116 degrees and exceeding previous September records by a landslide of seven degrees. This latest peak, amid a historic heat wave torching the state, follows a year of significant extremes in Sacramento: In the past 12 months, before this record hot day, the s...

California’s capital experienced its hottest day ever observed Tuesday — hitting an unprecedented 116 degrees and exceeding previous September records by a landslide of seven degrees. This latest peak, amid a historic heat wave torching the state, follows a year of significant extremes in Sacramento: In the past 12 months, before this record hot day, the state capital experienced its wettest day on record last October, an event bookended by a record-long dry stretch that wreaked havoc on agriculture throughout California’s Central Valley.

The most recent heat has fueled dangerous wildfire weather, and there’s continued risk of power shortages. Rolling blackouts have been a constant threat in the Golden State in the past several days, as the state’s grid operator experiences record demand.

It’s all part of a past year that’s been meteorological hell for the Central Valley — and Sacramento has been the scene of a bingo card of climate-fueled weather hazards. The extreme droughts and deluges are two sides of the same coin — all of these records made more probable by a warming planet.

The average early-September high in Sacramento is about 90 degrees — hot but manageable in a climate of low humidity. Highs have warmed about 1.4 degrees since the late 1940s, and despite little change in overall yearly rainfall, Septembers are trending drier.

Before this ongoing heat wave, downtown Sacramento had never logged a temperature higher than 109 degrees during the month of September. Then it hit 113 degrees Monday and a staggering 116 degrees Tuesday.

“Obviously we’re starting to see temperatures like this happening in September and October, but it’s more like what we’d see in July or August,” said Emily Heller, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Sacramento.

Beating a monthly record by 7 degrees is virtually unheard of — it hasn’t happened there since the 1940s, and back then it was possible only because many records were “younger” and easier to surpass. It’s analogous to running a marathon and winning by 10 minutes or more.

Here's one way to visualize just how extreme this CA heatwave is - Sacramento has a GHCN station with data back to 1877.In these 145 years, Sacramento never recorded a September temperature at/above 110F. Today's all-time record heat also broke the Sept record by a big margin! https://t.co/WuFIca1PaO pic.twitter.com/4mskFqY4l8

— Tomer Burg (@burgwx) September 7, 2022

It goes without saying that a hotter world will lend itself to more frequent, intense and long-duration heat extremes. Sacramento hasn’t set a monthly cold-temperature record since 1999 but has logged 10 monthly high temperature records since then.

The graph below illustrates the intersection of weather and climate quite well. There will always exist an inherent degree of natural variability in weather, but human-caused climate change is skewing things hotter. The blue curve marks the distribution of high-temperature observations from 1950 to 1980, and the red curve represents 1991 to 2021.

Notice the trend — the red curve is just a bit further to the right, which suddenly translates to considerably more days in the 94 degree-plus range. That’s the crux of climate change — it’s nonlinear. In other words, a subtle warming of a degree or two translates to perhaps exponentially more high-end extremes. Sacramento is seeing that firsthand.

A favorite false talking point among some who reject climate science is that opposites such as drought and flood cannot both be caused by the same phenomenon. But in fact, drought and flooding — both of which have had major effects in Sacramento over the past year — are intimately linked by a premise called Clausius-Clapeyron.

Here’s what the premise says: For every degree Fahrenheit the air temperature warms, the atmosphere can hold about 4 percent more water. It’s an exponential relationship. When moisture is available, as in a saturated environment, i.e. a rainstorm, precipitation rates and totals tend to be more extreme. In the absence of moisture, the air can more efficiently evaporate what little remains in the ground, depleting moisture from the landscape and reinforcing drought. That allows the air to warm further, which entrenches the cyclical process even more.

It comes as no surprise that the past year has included Sacramento’s longest drought on record and most severe one-day rain total. Between March 20 and Oct. 17, 2021, not a drop of rain fell on Sacramento — a streak of 212 days. The previous longest dry spell had stretched 194 days and ended in November 1880.

The state’s 2021 dry streak ended with flooding. Moderate rain fell Oct. 21, 22 and 23, but then 5.44 inches came down on the 24th alone. It was Sacramento’s wettest day on record — especially bizarre considering September averages only 0.93 inches. Another 0.37 inches fell the next day.

Some research suggests that slower west-to-east movement of the jet stream is in part contributing to weather patterns that get “stuck,” making it easier for the same conditions — for example, prolonged rainfall — to linger before the weather changes abruptly.

No single weather event is caused by climate change — but the intensity, frequency, duration and coverage of many extremes are boosted by human influence.

On a typical day, most of us won’t notice things are a degree or two warmer than they were 50 years ago. But suddenly that degree or two manifests in more broken records when outlier events are shifted into unprecedented territory.

There is evidence to indicate the fundamental patterns of our atmosphere are shifting, resulting in myriad hazards that are challenging communities. Sacramento is proof. And as precipitation and temperature extremes become even more pronounced and dramatic, the impact on communities and everyday life may continue to grow more quickly than society can adapt to.

CA Attorney General Bonta Intervenes in Sacramento/Natomas Unified Case, Urges District to Address Discipline Issues but Still Keep Kids in School

By Kacie WilliamsSACRAMENTO, CA – California Attorney General Rob Bonta filed an amicus brief last week in the Natomas Unified School District v. Sacramento County Board of Education, urging an appellate court to overturn what the brief called the unlawful expulsion of an elementary school student.Bonta’s brief argues California law states students have a constitutional right to education and only students who “pose the greatest threat to safety” will undergo mandatory expulsion. And sch...

By Kacie Williams

SACRAMENTO, CA – California Attorney General Rob Bonta filed an amicus brief last week in the Natomas Unified School District v. Sacramento County Board of Education, urging an appellate court to overturn what the brief called the unlawful expulsion of an elementary school student.

Bonta’s brief argues California law states students have a constitutional right to education and only students who “pose the greatest threat to safety” will undergo mandatory expulsion. And school districts must follow proper legal procedures before deciding to expel a student.

Students who have discipline issues should have their behaviors corrected without having their educational rights stripped of them, so long as it can be done in a way that is also safe for other students. In the case at hand, the school district failed to follow California’s standards for school discipline, AG Bonta said.

“Every child in California has the right to go to school and get an education,” said Bonta, adding expulsion should only be used as the absolute last resort, not a measure that we default to. Removing children from school can have strong lasting effects and consequences on that student.

In 2019, the Natomas Unified School District had a student who brought “unloaded, orange-tipped airsoft guns and a sealed bag of white plastic pellets” to school.

While the behavior of this student was concerning, the Natomas Unified School district disregarded the legal process necessary to follow before expelling a student, claims Bonta’s amicus brief.

The California Legislature later enacted a detailed statutory framework to govern student discipline, which entails non-punitive classroom discipline that has been shown to be more effective and efficient than suspension or expulsion.

It was also found that suspensions and expulsions disproportionately affected students of color, students with disabilities, LGBT students and other vulnerable student populations.

Moving forward under new law, expulsions must only be carried out after providing students to be able to form a defense for their actions.

Bonta’s brief notes the school district did not follow the law and the Sacramento County Board of Education then reversed the order. The case is currently on appeal before the California Court of Appeal for the Third Appellate District.

The amicus brief charges disruption of school activities is not a reason for expulsion, and before expulsion a school district must provide supported findings and afford students the process set out in the Education Code, among a few other items.

AG Bonta also said, “I urge the appellate court to protect the rights of all of California’s students and erase this unlawful expulsion from the record.”

California heat wave: Wednesday set to be another triple-digit day following record-breaking heat

Wednesday is set to be another hot triple-digit day — although not nearly as hot as Tuesday when the Sacramento area shattered all-time records for heat.Downtown Sacramento reached 116 degrees, the hottest temperature ever recorded for the area. Stockton reached 115, matching its previous record, while Modesto hit 112, just under its record of 113.Meteorologist Tamara Berg says Wednesday will be in “record territory” again, although there aren’t as many records expected to fall as the day before.&...

Wednesday is set to be another hot triple-digit day — although not nearly as hot as Tuesday when the Sacramento area shattered all-time records for heat.

Downtown Sacramento reached 116 degrees, the hottest temperature ever recorded for the area. Stockton reached 115, matching its previous record, while Modesto hit 112, just under its record of 113.

Meteorologist Tamara Berg says Wednesday will be in “record territory” again, although there aren’t as many records expected to fall as the day before.

“It is going to be continuing to be hot, as this ridge of high pressure is close to us for the most part, but once we get into Friday, it does look like we’ll take some of the edge off the heat as the ridge travels a little farther to the east,” Berg said.

Make use of the cooler morning hours for any strenuous activities and try to limit your outdoor exposure between 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

She added that as some tropical moisture comes up from the south through the weekend, we could start to see temperatures that are closer to average for this time of year.

How to tell if your sunscreen has expired

Weather Impact Days are still in place for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, as temperatures stay in the triple digits. This alert is in place when you should take steps to keep yourself safe from the weather. In this case, the heat could be threatening to sensitive groups.

Wednesday is expected to see a high of 110, while Thursday is set at 111, and Friday is back to 110 degrees. Wednesday is also the eighth day in a row of Flex Alerts for California.

By the start of the weekend, the Sacramento area could have temperatures back in the mid-90s.

Find the full forecast here:

Increased Fire Risk

The hot weather will dry fuels, meaning fires can start quickly and spread faster.

If you are going to be camping this weekend, be very careful with any campfires and do not leave them unattended.

Be aware of your surroundings and be ready to move if you see or smell smoke.

Fire officials across the region are worried that the high heat, paired with the dry conditions, will spread fires easier. Sacramento Metro Fire Captain Parker Wilbourn said that it is especially concerning with many people expected to grill outside, including in the wildland areas, during the holiday weekend.

"With the conditions being so hot, we are on edge," Wilbourn said. "Sometimes it just takes that small spark, whether it be from a barbecue or a chain hitting the ground from a trailer or any open flame at a campsite, a small spark can create a very large wildfire that threatens our communities and threatens our homes.”

KCRA's Fire Threat Index

KCRA 3’s weather team has developed a tool the team will be using to keep you informed as fire conditions change. It’s called the Fire Threat Index. This will give you an idea of the fire risk on any given day in different areas of our coverage region so you can plan ahead.

Toggle below to see the Fire Threat Index for different parts of Northern California over the next few days:

The Fire Index will stay in the High category until cooler weather arrives next week.

Here's how to find NorCal cooling centers

Cooling centers across Northern California are open to allow some residents to get a break from the forecasted week of triple-digit heat.

| Read More | Here are the cooling centers opening Thursday amid forecast triple digits in NorCal

| VIDEO BELOW | What to know about heat-related illnesses

Flex Alert extended: California residents urged to ease power usage

California's grid operator is asking people to conserve power for the seventh day in a row as it extended its Flex Alert into Tuesday. Residents are urged to conserve electricity from 4 p.m. until 9 p.m. Cal ISO also on Monday issued an Energy Emergency Alert Watch on Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. With an EEA Watch, energy deficiencies are expected and the grid manager will seek to get additional energy from other sources to help avoid the risk of a rolling blackout.

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District, or SMUD, is also asking customers to conserve electricity from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Officials say that if people don't dramatically ramp up conservation efforts, the state may be forced to turn to rotating outages.

This week, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order meant to ramp up the state's energy supply temporarily.

Customers can help ease pressure on the grid by easing power usage during the afternoon and evening:

| Video Below | California residents asked to ease power usage as temperatures rise in coming week

Sacramento County officials recommend canceling outdoor events

The Sacramento County Division of Public Health and Office of Emergency Services in a release Wednesday that it recommends outdoor events between noon to 8 p.m. from Saturday to Tuesday be canceled.

This includes youth sports, community gatherings, parades, marches or any events that could involve children, older adults, or any people with compromised immune systems that may be sensitive to the heat.

| VIDEO BELOW | Event organizers make changes to account for weekend heat

What is a heat dome and why is it popping up on social media?

As the name suggests, a heat dome is a region of very warm or hot air that can linger in the same general location for several days to a couple of weeks. This is a fairly common weather pattern in the U.S. West during the summer months.

The "dome" effect is created when a strong area of high pressure lingers over an area for an extended period of time. The stronger the high, the more likely it is to trap air underneath it.

The longer that air remains trapped in place, the more the sun works to heat the air, producing gradual warming day after day.

Any area of high pressure, whether a "heat dome" or not, forces air to slowly sink. Sinking air compresses as it reaches the ground and that forces the air to warm up even more.

Air also gets drier as it sinks. Drier air can heat more dramatically than air that is moister, so this can even further amplify warming.

| Read More | What is a heat dome and how is it impacting Northern California heat?

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Here's where to find our latest video forecast. You can also watch a livestream of our latest newscast here. The banner on our website turns red when we're live.

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Here is where you can download our app for the latest weather alerts.

Kaiser will return to contract talks with union of 2,000-plus mental health workers in CA

Kaiser Permanente reached out to striking mental health clinicians to request bargaining sessions on Thursday and Friday, saying the company remains “committed to reaching a fair and equitable agreement that’s good for our therapists and our patients.”The National Union of Healthcare Workers represents a little more than 2,000 psychologists, social workers and counselors providing behavioral healt...

Kaiser Permanente reached out to striking mental health clinicians to request bargaining sessions on Thursday and Friday, saying the company remains “committed to reaching a fair and equitable agreement that’s good for our therapists and our patients.”

The National Union of Healthcare Workers represents a little more than 2,000 psychologists, social workers and counselors providing behavioral health services to Kaiser members. They have been on strike in Northern California since Aug. 15.

“In the days leading up to the decision by NUHW leadership to go forward with their strike, Kaiser Permanente was working hard to reach agreement on a new contract,” company leaders said in a statement released Tuesday. “Our last offer, presented the weekend before the strike, includes an economic proposal that NUHW had previously agreed to, with competitive annual wage increases, a lump sum cash payment and a retroactive cash payment of up to $6,300.”

The company also said its last proposal had addressed the union’s concerns about working conditions. Kaiser had offered to allow the clinicians to spend 18% of their time on tasks other than seeing patients, up from 15%. Kaiser officials said they extended the deadline on their last offer.

NUHW President Sal Rosselli said the union’s bargaining team would meet with Kaiser on Thursday.

“Our members have shown incredible resolve and remain determined to strike for as long as it takes to make Kaiser meet the mental health care needs of its patients,” he said. “We had already agreed to Kaiser’s wage proposal. This strike is about patient care, and the settlement offer that Kaiser made prior to the start of the strike would not have addressed the severe understaffing of Kaiser mental health clinics that forces patients to wait months for mental health therapy sessions in violation of state law and has resulted in therapists leaving Kaiser in droves over the past year.”

Kaiser’s behavioral health workers had told The Bee in interviews over the phone and on the picket line that their main concern was not pay. They said they are determined to improve working conditions that have caused many of their colleagues to leave the company, high turnover that they say results in burnout for the clinicians who remain.

Ken Rogers, a Kaiser psychologist who practices in Elk Grove, said the 3% increase in what Kaiser is calling administrative work would be an “incremental change” that would do little to attract and retain behavioral health clinicians.

“Even if we write the notes by hand in the session, we have to record them in the computer and they have to be a certain format,” Rogers said. “Sometimes we have to check ... their behavioral health statistics: the numbers on questionnaires, things they filled out. We have to ask them about that. My job is actually pretty involved when it comes to those sorts of things. It’s really not: You come in. You sit on the couch. We have 50 minutes, and then we’re done.”

Because the insurer does not have enough therapists, Rogers and others have said patients are waiting two or three months for follow-up appointments that they should get within 10 business days. All too often, Rogers said, he and his colleagues are scheduling patients into their lunch hours and into time set aside for that “administrative work.”

Kaiser has said that turnover in its behavioral health services unit is no greater than the national average for all health care workers.

“Over the past five years we have added hundreds of new mental health clinicians to our workforce,” company leaders said in an earlier statement. “We’ve worked hard to expand the number of therapists in California and are investing $30 million to build a pipeline to educate and train new mental health professionals across the state. We have significantly expanded our ability to provide virtual care to patients who want it, increasing convenience and access.”

The California Department of Managed Health Care has launched an investigation into whether the company is providing timely access to behavioral health care amid the strike. Consumers can reach the DMHC at 888-466-2219 or at www.healthhelp.ca.gov.

This story was originally published September 6, 2022 4:37 PM.

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