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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Minneapolis

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Minneapolis, MN. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market – to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Minneapolis’s leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you’re looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Minneapolis. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it’s easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Minneapolis, MN. We’re proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We’re here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That’s why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Minneapolis,
what are we talking about?

Feta Cheese

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

Baba Ganoush

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

Baklava

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Minneapolis, MN, you won’t want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it’s no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It’s best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party – you’re almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

Shawarma

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason – this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Minneapolis, MN.

Hummus

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That’s because it’s considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there’s one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you’re looking to make some positive changes in your life, this “diet” is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures’ foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke – especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery – we’re always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It’s refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn’t have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don’t start with meats and sweets.

4.

They’re tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you’re essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That’s great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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Latest News in Minneapolis

COVID-19 test hoarding in Minnesota limits appointments amid omicron surge

Appointments for COVID-19 tests are unavailable at several free sites in the Twin Cities amid growing concern over the omicron surge of the pandemic.Vault Health, the operator of the state's free testing sites, is experiencing unprecedented demand at the same time as workers' coronavirus infections are hurting its capacity to collect and process tests. Spokeswoman Kate Brickman said people who already have ordered free at-home tests can help by using them first, ahead of their expiration date, rather than saving them and coming to tes...

Appointments for COVID-19 tests are unavailable at several free sites in the Twin Cities amid growing concern over the omicron surge of the pandemic.

Vault Health, the operator of the state's free testing sites, is experiencing unprecedented demand at the same time as workers' coronavirus infections are hurting its capacity to collect and process tests. Spokeswoman Kate Brickman said people who already have ordered free at-home tests can help by using them first, ahead of their expiration date, rather than saving them and coming to test sites instead.

"Just as people are physically hoarding tests as demand for testing soars, people are also now hoarding test appointments," Brickman said.

Demand is coming amid a stunning increase in coronavirus activity in Minnesota, which reported a record 19.1% positivity rate of diagnostic testing in the seven-day period ending Jan. 3. The state on Tuesday also reported another 29,487 coronavirus infections and 28 COVID-19 deaths, rounding up pandemic activity over the weekend.

Minnesota's new seven-day infection rate is 45th lowest compared with other states, but mostly because of the rapid spread of the omicron variant elsewhere, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Minnesota's new infection rate is actually higher now than it was last fall when it had the nation's worst rate.

Omicron infections in other states and countries have produced lower rates of severe COVID-19 than earlier versions of the coronavirus, and Minnesota health officials hope that pattern will continue. COVID-19 hospitalizations have increased in Minnesota, rising back above 1,500 for the first time in a month and reaching 1,528 on Monday. COVID-19 hospitalizations requiring intensive care have been declining for the past month, though, and reached 263 on Monday.

Minnesota's rising positivity rate in recent days at least partly reflected the reduced number of tests that occurred over the holidays. That is no longer the case. Minnesota reported the highest rate of tests in the seven-day period ending Jan. 3 since December 2020.

Vault's test scheduling site at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday listed ample appointments in mid-January in greater Minnesota locations such as Duluth and Winona, and a few at Roy Wilkins Auditorium in St. Paul. But no appointments were available at the Minneapolis Convention Center, a former motor vehicles building in Bloomington, or a new site in Anoka opened in the past week to expand state testing capacity.

Brickman noted that people can walk in for COVID-19 tests at all sites other than the Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport.

Concerns also have emerged about a startup COVID-19 testing business and whether it is reliable. The Better Business Bureau chapter for Minnesota and the Dakotas joined an ongoing investigation out of Illinois of the Center for COVID Control, which operates testing sites in Minneapolis, St. Paul and other locations in the state. A cluster of consumer complaints have emerged about test results being delayed or containing incorrect information, said Bao Vang, a spokeswoman for the local BBB chapter.

Before the investigation, the BBB had warned the public about the potential for sham testing sites popping up based on complaints in several other states.

"Any time there is scarcity of any products or services, demand is going to go up and the supply is going to be limited," Vang said. "Scammers are going to use that opportunity and take advantage of our vulnerabilities at that time."

The agency encouraged people to talk to their doctors and do consumer research before paying companies for COVID-19 tests. The Minnesota Hospital Association last week also urged people not to go to emergency rooms for tests because they remain overrun with patients.

Hundreds Experiencing Homelessness In Minneapolis Suffering Through Extreme Weather

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesotans without a home are doing what they can to stay warm.Hennepin County tells WCCO it moved more than 400 people into permanent housing before the cold hit this year. But many will make the decision to stay outside in the bitter cold.READ MORE: Wednesday night is a particularly dangerous one at encampments across Minneapolis. Avivo outreach workers Justin LaBeaux and Madi McLaughlin come with supplies, offering to help find shelter space.“We all go o...

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesotans without a home are doing what they can to stay warm.

Hennepin County tells WCCO it moved more than 400 people into permanent housing before the cold hit this year. But many will make the decision to stay outside in the bitter cold.

READ MORE:

Wednesday night is a particularly dangerous one at encampments across Minneapolis. Avivo outreach workers Justin LaBeaux and Madi McLaughlin come with supplies, offering to help find shelter space.

“We all go out together every day and make the rounds and check on folks,” LaBeaux said.

“Especially the oncoming weather that’s gonna come in this weekend, a lot of people are preparing, trying to stay warm,” McLaughlin said.

Wednesday, everyone they have talked to is planning to stay put through the night.

“Not every shelter option is gonna be right for everybody,” LaBeaux said. “Some folks are worried about their belongings. A lot of folks have partners, too, and the shelter systems are mostly single adults.”

They estimate hundreds across the city will spend the night outside — sometimes staying warm in unsafe ways.

“A lot of people were asking for propane or trying to get heaters or generators,” McLaughlin said.

“Blankets can only do so much when it’s negative-6,” LaBeaux said.

READ MORE:

Some items that are particularly helpful on a day like Wednesday are hand warmers or foil blankets, which can be used to insulate the inside of a tent.

David Hewitt is director of housing stability for Hennepin County.

“We do have partners who in extreme weather open up some additional beds to help us manage any additional demand,” Hewitt said.

Hennepin County says it has recently opened three new shelters, including Avivo Village. The 100-unit tiny home community is full.

The county says there have not been COVID-19 outbreaks at shelters, and they’ve been housing older and at-risk people in hotels. Shelters are also now open 24/7.

“We’ve invested probably about $3 million a year to ensure the shelters can stay open throughout the day, and are committing funds to continuing that into the future,” Hewitt said.

Still, the goal and challenge continues to be finding permanent, sustainable housing for all.

“We’re gonna continue to do what we can,” LaBeaux said.

“A lot of people are just trying to make it through the night and through the cold,” McLaughlin said.

Avivo says donations of hand warmers and big winter jackets are welcomed.

MORE NEWS:

Shelter is guaranteed in Hennepin County for families with children. For information on adult shelters, call Simpson Housing Services at 612-248-2350. For information on family shelters, call 612-348-9410.

‘We’re Scared’: Restaurants Grapple With New COVID Restrictions In Minneapolis, St. Paul

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Beginning next Wednesday, if you want to go out to eat in Minneapolis or St. Paul you’ll need to show proof of vaccination or a recent negative COVID-19 test.“If you’re coming downtown, if you’re coming to a restaurant, you’re going to a show, going to see the Wild or Timberwolves, g...

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Beginning next Wednesday, if you want to go out to eat in Minneapolis or St. Paul you’ll need to show proof of vaccination or a recent negative COVID-19 test.

“If you’re coming downtown, if you’re coming to a restaurant, you’re going to a show, going to see the Wild or Timberwolves, go get your vaccination cards,” Erik Hansen, director of Economic Policy and Development with the city of Minneapolis, said. “Please go get vaccinated. It’s the easiest way to get in to a business.”

READ MORE:

The recent surge in cases forced both mayors to work together to find a way to reduce the impact of COVID-19. They say the mandate is one way to make sure businesses stay open and people stay safe.

“The surge in COVID cases across our city is causing pileups at testing sites and is overwhelming our hospitals and our health care workers. And the data is exceedingly clear that more is needed to keep our cities safe,” Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said.

Here are the rules in St. Paul: You need to show proof of vaccination (no booster required) or a negative lab test result from within three days. None of those self-administered antigen home test kits are allowed. And children under 5 are exempt.

The big difference in Minneapolis is that 2 to 5 year olds will also need that negative lab test.

The news hit some restauranteurs with a thud.

“Seriously, we are going through enough stuff already. This is another thing that we cannot handle,” said Lotus Restaurant’s Yoom Nguyen.

He believes the mandate will do the exact opposite of what city leaders expect.

“Restaurants are empty again, and to do something like this, of course, it’s going to hurt our bottom line,” Nguyen said.

Nguyen says the mandate adds more worry to restaurant owners because, unlike bars, they do not have someone at the door to handle checking vaccination cards.

“There is no way I’m going to hire someone to stand here at the door and to check ID’s. What do we do when people are picking up food for to-go orders? Delivery drivers? There are a whole bunch of things that come along with this that doesn’t make sense to us,” he said.

At Keys Cafe and Bakery in downtown St. Paul, manager Sasha Renee already wears several hats.

READ MORE:

“I’m basically the host, the busser, the server, the bartender, the manager, the food runner, the expo,” Renee said.

But starting on Jan. 19th, she will have to add “checking customers for proof of vaccination” to her list — and that has her feeling uneasy.

“I do think we’ll have conflict because we already have people that don’t want to comply with the masks,” she said. “Are we supposed to ask for IDs too to make sure it’s their vaccine card and not someone they borrowed it from?”

She says between Omicron and mask mandates, business is already down.

“We’re scared. Like, are we gonna have to cut our hours? Are we going to have to temporarily close?” Renee said.

Keys customer Jody Ray doesn’t mind.

“I’m all for it. I carry my card with me all time, I have a picture of it,” Ray said. “I think things should even be stricter.”

For Josh Hedquist, owner of Joey Meatballs, the news was another gut punch. And his gut reaction?

“I know why people make these decisions where they feel like it’s in the best effort for their community, but it’s gonna affect us,” Hedquist said. “And there’s no way around it.”

Hedquist and several others tell WCCO that training staff on this and adding this to their plate will be a challenge. Though some say they’re not worried about it. Fair State Brewing has been checking vax cards with IDs at the bar, and Namaste Cafe at their host stand.

Minneapolis says your card, a picture of your card or the Minnesota Docket app will all work, and that this will be in place until the Omicron surge peaks.

And businesses hope customers will work through this with them.

MORE NEWS:

“I’m just ready for the hurdles to stop,” Hedquist said.

Snowstorm Set To Hit MN Friday: Here's What We Know

"At least a few inches of accumulating snow is looking increasingly likely Friday," the National Weather Service said.MINNEAPOLIS — A snowstorm is set to hit Minnesota Friday, but there is still a lot of unknowns. "At least a few inches of accumulating snow is looking increasingly likely Friday," the National Weather Service said."A wide area will be affected by accumulating snow beginning Thursday night and lingering through most of Friday. The track of the storm and amount of snow will be refi...

"At least a few inches of accumulating snow is looking increasingly likely Friday," the National Weather Service said.

MINNEAPOLIS — A snowstorm is set to hit Minnesota Friday, but there is still a lot of unknowns. "At least a few inches of accumulating snow is looking increasingly likely Friday," the National Weather Service said.

"A wide area will be affected by accumulating snow beginning Thursday night and lingering through most of Friday. The track of the storm and amount of snow will be refined over the coming days."

For now, the Twin Cities and most of the state are in the"area of potential impacts." Potential snowfall totals are not yet known.

Here's the current NWS forecast for the Twin Cities metro area:

Tuesday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 31. South southeast wind around 10 mph becoming west in the afternoon.

Tuesday Night: A 20 percent chance of snow after 3am. Increasing clouds, with a low around 22. West southwest wind 5 to 10 mph.

Wednesday: A 20 percent chance of snow before noon. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 31. West wind around 5 mph becoming north northwest in the afternoon.

Wednesday Night: A 20 percent chance of snow after midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 17. Northwest wind around 5 mph becoming southwest in the evening.

Thursday: Mostly cloudy, with a high near 27. West northwest wind around 5 mph becoming north in the afternoon.

Thursday Night: A 40 percent chance of snow after midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 17. North northeast wind 5 to 10 mph becoming east after midnight.

Friday: Snow likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 24. East wind around 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Friday Night: A 40 percent chance of snow before midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 8. Northeast wind 5 to 10 mph.

Saturday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 20. North northeast wind around 5 mph becoming south southwest in the afternoon.

Saturday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 10. South wind 5 to 10 mph.

Sunday: Partly sunny, with a high near 29. South southwest wind around 10 mph becoming west in the afternoon.

Sunday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 9. West northwest wind around 10 mph.

M.L.King Day: Mostly sunny, with a high near 18. Northwest wind 5 to 10 mph.

Why a northern Minnesota tribal college is expanding — in Minneapolis

Red Lake Nation College, a tribal college in northern Minnesota, has plans to expand the college with a Minneapolis campus.Established in 2001 with a main building on the southern shore of Red Lake, the school is a two-year tribal college, specializing in culturally specific academics and providing what Red Lake Nation College President Dan King calls a “hugely important” role in advancing the education and careers of Native people.The college’s future Minneapolis campus will be three buildings, located at 900...

Red Lake Nation College, a tribal college in northern Minnesota, has plans to expand the college with a Minneapolis campus.

Established in 2001 with a main building on the southern shore of Red Lake, the school is a two-year tribal college, specializing in culturally specific academics and providing what Red Lake Nation College President Dan King calls a “hugely important” role in advancing the education and careers of Native people.

The college’s future Minneapolis campus will be three buildings, located at 900, 910, and 912 3rd Street South, parcels that include the old Tiger Oak Media building near the light rail and across the street from U.S. Bank Stadium.

Last week, the Minneapolis Planning Commission approved site plans for the future campus, which will feature classrooms, training spaces, student services, office space and other student facilities. The estimated cost of the expansion is $10 million, and RLNC says classes in the new facilities are slated to begin in fall 2023.

The mission for the planned Minneapolis campus is to provide the same Native-centric education in the Twin Cities that students get on the Red Lake campus, said King. Roughly half of the tribe’s 16,000 or so members live on the Red Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota, but a sizable number of the rest live in the Twin Cities, which has one of the largest urban populations of Native people in the U.S.

The size of that population was one of reasons RLNC leadership decided to explore opening a Minneapolis campus. Though Indigenous people who live in the metro are close to other colleges and universities, they believed Native learners could also benefit from the tribal college experience.

“Seventy percent of Red Lake College staff are Red Lake Nation tribal members or other Native Americans,” said King, who also noted that 80 percent of the RLNC students are first generation of their families to go to college. “Mentoring is a big part of our mission.”

The college not only specializes in educating Native people, but in personalized, one-on-one learning. The average size of a Red Lake Nation College class is 10. “We have to do that otherwise our students wouldn’t make it,” said King. “We hold their hands a lot and practice what we call ‘intrusive advising.’ We get in their business and we make them stay in college. We go over to their house and say ‘Hey, get out of bed and go to class.’”

King said that the goal of a tribal college like Red Lake Nation College is not only to give Native students a space to learn, but to give them skills they will one day bring back to their tribal nations. “We have a real shortage of tribal members with the education to be leaders in our businesses, government, social work, teachers, doctors, lawyers, really any area you can think of, we need more tribal members educated,” said King, who is a Red Lake member.

Over the last decade, the annual average of adults in America who attained a bachelor’s degree is around 30 percent. On the Red Lake Reservation, that annual number is 1.5 percent.“That’s not an education gap, that’s an education canyon,” said King.

Red Lake Nation College’s original location offers two-year degrees and encourages students to enroll in other schools in order to complete their bachelor’s and higher degrees. The new Minneapolis campus, which is still awaiting accreditation, is set to offer four-year degrees.

In a statement, Mayor Jacob Frey said: “This is a significant next step in a partnership with the Red Lake Nation that we as a city will continue to prioritize.”

“Culturally-focused education is a wonderful thing,” said City Council Member-elect Michael Rainville, whose Ward 3 will be home to the school. “The campus will be a great part of downtown and will complement the public colleges we have in Loring Park and the University of St. Thomas Law School.”

This development of Red Lake Nation College’s expansion into downtown is the latest in an effort to make downtown “for everyone,” said current Ward 3 City Council Member Steve Fletcher, and specifically more welcoming to the city’s Native population.

Fletcher noted that the city has also partnered with Red Lake Nation on a transitional housing project that benefits Native people in the city and that he and other city leaders met last year for a historic summit between Minneapolis and four Dakota tribes regarding projects on the Mississippi River.

Fletcher said downtown has a ways to go to be truly welcoming to Native Americans, and that the city should focus on projects that enhance the present and future of Native residents. “There’s always a tendency to ascribe indigeneity to the past,” said Fletcher. “What I love about having a college is that it is very much about the present and the future.”

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