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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Las Vegas

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Las Vegas, NV. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market – to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Las Vegas’s leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you’re looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Las Vegas. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it’s easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Las Vegas, NV. We’re proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We’re here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That’s why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Las Vegas,
what are we talking about?

Feta Cheese

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

Baba Ganoush

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

Baklava

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Las Vegas, NV, you won’t want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it’s no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It’s best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party – you’re almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

Shawarma

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason – this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Las Vegas, NV.

Hummus

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That’s because it’s considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there’s one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you’re looking to make some positive changes in your life, this “diet” is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures’ foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke – especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery – we’re always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It’s refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn’t have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don’t start with meats and sweets.

4.

They’re tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you’re essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That’s great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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Latest News in Las Vegas

Additional COVID-19 testing sites reopening in Southern Nevada

--> Sorry, we're having issues playing this video.In the meantime, try watching one of the videos below.LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — In response to a local surge in testing demand, the Southern Nevada Health District and Clark County report the two will open two drive-thru COVID-19 testing sites late this month.The site will be in the parking garages at Texas Station and Fiesta Henderson hotel casinos to support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, according to officials.“As COVID-19 cases ...

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LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — In response to a local surge in testing demand, the Southern Nevada Health District and Clark County report the two will open two drive-thru COVID-19 testing sites late this month.

The site will be in the parking garages at Texas Station and Fiesta Henderson hotel casinos to support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, according to officials.

“As COVID-19 cases surge here and elsewhere around the world, Clark County and partnering jurisdictions and agencies are working together to combine resources to meet the needs of our community,” said Clark County Commission Chairman Jim Gibson.

The sites are operated by eTrueNorth, a DHHS contractor, and will be available for 21 days. The sites are available by appointment and people can register on the eTrueNorth website here.

Additional testing information can be found on the Southern Nevada Health District COVID-19 testing site page here. People can register for their appointment three days prior to their preferred date.

Officials say Clark County, the Southern Nevada Health District and the state of Nevada requested the additional testing resources to help meet the community’s testing needs with support from the City of North Las Vegas and the City of Henderson.

To accommodate heavy demand for testing, the sites will operate as appointment-only sites offering approximately 4,000 tests each day.

The Texas Station operation will open to the public at 3 p.m. on Jan. 12 on the first floor of the resort’s parking garage on the south side of the property at 2101 Texas Star Lane, off Rancho Drive and Coran Lane. The site will operate five days a week from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday.

The drive-thru operation at the Fiesta Henderson resort will open at 3 p.m. on Jan. 15 at 777 W. Lake Mead Parkway. The site will operate five days a week from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday through Wednesday.

“These new sites will provide more accessibility for Southern Nevadans who are looking for testing in Clark County. Testing remains an important tool to ensure people have the ability to take the steps they need to protect themselves, their families and our community,” said Dr. Fermin Leguen, district health officer for the Southern Nevada Health District.

Appointment registration and lab processing will be managed by eTrueNorth. Individuals will be provided with information to receive their test results, which should be available in less than 48 hours. Results will be available through the eTrueNorth site. People who have difficulty accessing their results can call 1-800-635-8611.

To access their results, registrants will need to set up a username and password on the website.

If someone tests positive for COVID-19, they must stay home and self-isolate for five days after their test was collected or the first day they had symptoms.

If they do not have symptoms at that time (five days) or symptoms are resolving, they can leave isolation but they must continue to wear a mask around other people for five more days.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Titus raises alarm at shipment of nuclear materials to Nevada

WASHINGTON — Nuclear waste cleanup at the Idaho National Laboratory and the shipment and storage of the materials to other states prompted Rep. Dina Titus on Monday to demand specifics from the Department of Energy on the amount and risks to Las Vegas and the Nevada National Security Site.In a letter to Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm, Titus said she was troubled that her office was never notified that some of the waste removed from Idaho would be shipped and stored in Nevada.“The proximity of the NNSS to my (con...

WASHINGTON — Nuclear waste cleanup at the Idaho National Laboratory and the shipment and storage of the materials to other states prompted Rep. Dina Titus on Monday to demand specifics from the Department of Energy on the amount and risks to Las Vegas and the Nevada National Security Site.

In a letter to Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm, Titus said she was troubled that her office was never notified that some of the waste removed from Idaho would be shipped and stored in Nevada.

“The proximity of the NNSS to my (congressional) District and the fact that dangerous materials could be sharing the roads with my constituents and visitors raise a number of questions for me about this shipment of nuclear materials,” Titus wrote to Granholm.

The letter was sent late Monday.

“The Department of Energy values its relationship with the State of Nevada, and strives to conduct operations at the Nevada National Security Site with transparency, and with safety as its top priority,” an Energy Department spokesperson said. “Regarding waste shipments, all offsite wastes shipped to and disposed at the NNSS are handled safely and securely and must meet all applicable federal and state regulations as well as the rigorous NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria. We look forward to providing the information requested regarding the Department’s disposal operations at the NNSS and will work to ensure that our operations are conducted with the highest standards for transparency.”

The Department of Energy announced last month that the high-priority cleanup project in Idaho to protect the Snake River Plain Aquifer was ahead of schedule.

Most of the waste being removed is being sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The waste in Idaho originally came from cleanup of the Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado, which produced nuclear weapons before it closed in the 1970s.

The waste includes nuclear filters and other components and material used at the Colorado plant before it was shipped and stored in Idaho, where legal challenges by the state resulted in the exhumation and storage at another permanent location.

Only a small amount of the waste is being sent to other locations, including the Nevada National Security Site. Titus said the Department of Energy has not been forthcoming about the shipping of that waste to Nevada, or the details of the content of the waste.

“Since I learned about the proposed transfer of nuclear waste from Idaho, I’ve had concerns,” Titus said in a statement.

“After reports that portions of this waste were slated for the Nevada National Security Site, I’ve reached out to DOE. Until I receive satisfactory answers to all of my questions, I will continue to voice opposition to any transfers of nuclear material,” she said. “Nevada is not America’s dumping ground.”

Low-level and mixed low-level radioactive military waste are currently stored at the Nevada National Security Site.

In her letter to Granholm, Titus asked that the Energy Department disclose the amount of waste to be shipped to the Nevada National Security Site, and whether its is classified as low-level or mixed low-level, the latter of which includes toxic metals.

The Energy Department agreed to pay Nevada $65,000 last year for shipments of mischaracterized waste from Tennessee to the Nevada National Security Site over a five-year period.

Energy Department officials said the waste posed no health or safety risks to workers or the public.

The Energy Department also is under federal court order to remove a metric half-ton of weapons grade plutonium that was moved to the Nevada National Security Site, as the state sought to block the shipment. Federal officials revealed the shipments after the state had filed a lawsuit in federal court.

Las Vegas researchers: Omicron variant takes command in Southern Nevada

Las Vegas researchers predict that most news cases of COVID-19 in Southern Nevada for at least the next three weeks will be caused by the more contagious but seemingly milder omicron variant.The researchers predict that eight or nine of every 10 new cases will be caused by omicron, based on a genetic analysis of local wastewater, said Edwin Oh, an associate professor of neurogenetics at UNLV.Oh said that he and researcher Dan Gerrity, a microbiologist with the Southern Nevada Water Authority, are seeing the highest levels of th...

Las Vegas researchers predict that most news cases of COVID-19 in Southern Nevada for at least the next three weeks will be caused by the more contagious but seemingly milder omicron variant.

The researchers predict that eight or nine of every 10 new cases will be caused by omicron, based on a genetic analysis of local wastewater, said Edwin Oh, an associate professor of neurogenetics at UNLV.

Oh said that he and researcher Dan Gerrity, a microbiologist with the Southern Nevada Water Authority, are seeing the highest levels of the new coronavirus to date in Las Vegas Valley wastewater. The researchers analyze levels and strains of the virus, which passes through the body and appears in sewage.

With coronavirus levels at “all-time highs” in wastewater, “we worry that we are also going to see case numbers that we have never seen before,” Oh said in an email.

The researcher’s analysis comes as COVID-19 case numbers are soaring locally, across the country and around the globe.

Ongoing research will show whether strains mutating from delta, which has been the dominant variant and is associated with more serious illness, will disappear as omicron becomes more prevalent. Data out of South Africa — where omicron was first identified — the U.K. and now the U.S. suggests that omicron is less likely than delta to lead to hospitalization and death.

Genetic analysis of wastewater can detect that a new variant is emerging a week or even a month before a similar analysis of samples of positive COVID-19 test results in public health laboratories, Oh said.

Omicron, first detected in a Nevada test sample on Dec. 14, had been detected in wastewater a week earlier, he said. The alpha and epsilon variants were spotted in wastewater a month before actual cases were identified.

Genetic analysis of COVID-19 test samples over the past five days by the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory in Reno found that 58 percent of cases were the omicron variant, and 38 percent the delta variant and strains that had evolved from delta. Meanwhile, at one wastewater site in Las Vegas, omicron recently accounted for 95 percent of the virus detected.

The research also will help in understanding how the virus continues to evolve.

“A question moving forward is how will omicron mutate, and wastewater surveillance will help us determine this answer,” Oh said.

Contact Mary Hynes at [email protected] or 702-383-0336. Follow @MaryHynes1 on Twitter.

Staffing crisis at Clark County hospitals extends into second week

An increasing number of sick employees and an continuing rise in COVID-19 hospitalizations have extended a staffing crisis in Southern Nevada hospitals for a second week, and there’s no indication that the current wave of the disease has peaked, the Nevada Hospital Association said Wednesday.“The NHA continues to work with state government officials to scope the problem and seek solutions that can be immediately implemented,” the trade group said in its weekly COVID-19 update. “In the meantime, hospitals contin...

An increasing number of sick employees and an continuing rise in COVID-19 hospitalizations have extended a staffing crisis in Southern Nevada hospitals for a second week, and there’s no indication that the current wave of the disease has peaked, the Nevada Hospital Association said Wednesday.

“The NHA continues to work with state government officials to scope the problem and seek solutions that can be immediately implemented,” the trade group said in its weekly COVID-19 update. “In the meantime, hospitals continue to rely on overtime, team nursing, and other mitigation steps, realizing that these short-term solutions are not sustainable between the increases in COVID-19 hospitalizations coupled with the most challenging staff sick call rates.”

The group also said ICU capacity in Southern Nevada has been increased to “warning” status as the highly contagious omicron variant of the new coronavirus continues to spread, one step below crisis mode in the group’s five-tier threat assessment rating system.

The daily update on Clark County’s COVID-19 metrics Wednesday had nothing in it to cheer hospital executives and workers.

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State data showed that 1,463 people were hospitalized with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 in Clark County, an increase of 29 from Tuesday’s update. That number is now just 138 patients below the record high of 1,601 set during last winter’s surge of the disease.

The county also reported 4,946 new coronavirus cases and 17 deaths, bringing cumulative totals posted by the Southern Nevada Health District to 409,167 cases and 6,588 deaths.

New cases were well above the two-week moving average of 3,182 per day, which increased by two cases. Deaths were more than four times above the two-week moving average of four, which remained unchanged.

Fatalities have generally stayed flat while other metrics have climbed sharply in recent weeks, with most passing the levels seen during the peak of last winter’s surge.

The omicron variant is extremely transmissible but is less likely to cause serious illness than previous variants, public health experts say.

But the extreme rise in cases has nonetheless started to overwhelm hospitals, especially as people swarm emergency rooms looking for COVID-19 tests or for minor health problems.

The county’s 14-day test positivity rate stood at 33.4 percent on Wednesday, an increase of 2.1 percentage points from the previous day. That means that one of every three residents getting tested for COVID-19 are found to be infected.

State and county health agencies often redistribute daily data after it is reported to better reflect the date of death or onset of symptoms, which is why the moving-average trend lines frequently differ from daily reports and are considered better indicators of the direction of the outbreak.

State numbers

— 5,913 new cases and 23 new deaths over the preceding day, bringing totals to 536,257 cases and 8,584 deaths.

— 14-day moving averages stood at 3,730 daily new cases and five deaths per day.

— 14-day test positivity rate of 30.5 percent, an increase of 2.0 percentage points from Tuesday.

— 1,626 people currently hospitalized with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19.

— Rate of eligible Nevadans five and older who are fully vaccinated: 55.06 percent (vs. 54.40 percent in Clark County).

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Yes, Las Vegas is a bit ‘different’

Smoking is still allowed indoors, our drivers are among the worst in the nation, the LINQ parking structure floods like clockwork with every major rainstorm and the slot machines at grocery stores are, apparently, an acceptable way to dispose of extra pocke...

Smoking is still allowed indoors, our drivers are among the worst in the nation, the LINQ parking structure floods like clockwork with every major rainstorm and the slot machines at grocery stores are, apparently, an acceptable way to dispose of extra pocket money.

Yes, Las Vegas is a unique place.

For folks who were born elsewhere, living here is a subtly strange experience. Days of mundane normalcy are occasionally punctuated by brief reminders that this little town in the Mojave has an honored place in the imaginations of people all across the globe.

The sheer resiliency of our tourism industry over the last year — in the face of relentless and lingering concerns about the pandemic — demonstrates just how important our city has become to a world desperate for a little escapism. As Christmas weekend approached, the under-developed interstate that connects Vegas with Southern California saw its predictable congestion of tourists making pilgrimage to the city of neon lights and blackjack tables. And next weekend, despite new concerns over the Omicron variant, scores of people anxious to get a taste of our city will pack the hotels and resorts throughout the valley for a one-of-a-kind New Year’s Eve experience.

To be sure, the perception out-of-towners get of Las Vegas is something different than what is experienced by residents. When people elsewhere learn you’re from Las Vegas, they imagine you reside in some penthouse suite at Caesars, or that you can feel the spray from Bellagio’s fountains from your backyard. In reality, of course, living in Las Vegas isn’t much different than living in any other suburban city… except it is. And it’s different in strange and unexpected ways that are difficult to articulate to those who haven’t experienced it.

We do things our own way in this corner of the desert. Sure, many of us might be used to seeing slot machines in gas stations — but to the vast majority of Americans visiting our state, this is instantly identified as one of the weirdest indicators they are no longer in Kansas. And this time of year, that’s actually one of the more subtle ways we distinguish ourselves from the rest of the world.

Beyond the quaintly decorated Christmas trees and white stucco walls of our homes and apartments, this bustling city approaches the holiday season with unique eccentricity. Where else in the world does Santa speed down a zipline over the heads of inebriated revealers basking in the glow of flashing neon lights? New York City might have “the” tree at Rockefeller Center, but even that pales in comparison to the opulence of a 42-foot-tall Christmas tree and 7,500 poinsettias on display in Bellagio’s Conservatory.

And, of course, the 8-minute coordinated fireworks display scheduled for New Year’s Eve is rightly regarded as a spectacle to make the Times Square ball drop look positively boring.

Even away from The Strip, there’s something remarkable about this time of year that isn’t directly tied to doing things more “Vegas” than anywhere else. The small-town feel one gets visiting the valley’s numerous churches, city centers and local events is unexpected for a city of its size. The sense of community throughout the area’s suburban sprawl rivals anything one might find elsewhere.

Maybe that’s due to some shared sense of just how “different” the world perceives our hometown to be. We know we live somewhere special, and we’re anxious to share it with those around us.

There’s a love for this city that is palpable and obvious to those who move here. Maybe it’s because, for the vast majority of residents, living here is a deliberative life choice—not merely a product of circumstance. Any number of life events might lead people to Nevada, but deciding to build a life in Las Vegas requires a dedication to loving this quirky corner of America in all its imperfect glory. After all, few people would choose to live in scorching summer heat, brave some of the nation’s worst drivers or endure a weekly influx of party-focused tourists if they didn’t love everything else Vegas has to offer.

Much of the rest of the world assumes Nevada is a romantically distinctive place because it is home to Las Vegas. However, in truth, it’s the other way around. Nevada’s unique culture is what’s responsible for making this entertainment mecca what it is today. This oasis in the desert simply wouldn’t have been able to capture the world’s imagination if it had been created in California, Arizona or any other obscure stopover in these great United States, because it would lack the distinctly Nevadan virtue of embracing the unusual the way we do.

It’s one of the reasons Nevada is easy to fall in love with — and why Las Vegas, specifically, captures the hearts of so many who venture outside the crowded confines of the tourist corridor. Beyond the fountains, lights and extravagance of the mega resorts, Nevada hosts some of the most stunning landscapes in America, most welcoming local communities and most prideful residents (rightfully so) to be found anywhere.

Christmas and New Year’s Eve in Las Vegas, to those who didn’t grow up here, is certainly a “different” experience to behold — but so too is every season in the sunburnt suburban sprawl of “Sin City,” the snow drenched shores of Lake Tahoe or the farfetched outposts of rural Nevada.

That’s why we love it here and why “home” really does mean Nevada.

Michael Schaus is a communications and branding consultant based in Las Vegas, Nevada, and founder of Schaus Creative LLC — an agency dedicated to helping organizations, businesses and activists tell their story and motivate change. He is the former communications director for Nevada Policy Research Institute and has more than a decade of experience in public affairs commentary as a columnist, political humorist, and radio talk show host. Follow him at SchausCreative.com or on Twitter at @schausmichael.

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