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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Fresno

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Fresno, CA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Fresno's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Fresno. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Fresno, CA. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Fresno, CA

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Fresno,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Fresno, CA

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Fresno, CA

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Fresno, CA

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Fresno, CA, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Fresno, CA

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Fresno, CA

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Fresno, CA.

 Greek Grocery Store Fresno, CA

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Fresno, CA

Latest News in Fresno, CA

Friant Dam has more water than it can handle. Fresno wants it before it’s lost to ocean

After a month of more-than-abundant rainfall and years of drought in Fresno and the central San Joaquin Valley, the city of Fresno hopes to have an opportunity to buy discounted water from Millerton Lake that would otherwise flow down the San Joaquin River and be lost to the Pacific Ocean.Fresno City Council members unanimously voted Thursday to authorize a contract with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to purchase a share of “non-storable flood flows” — excess water that would be released to make room for more rainfal...

After a month of more-than-abundant rainfall and years of drought in Fresno and the central San Joaquin Valley, the city of Fresno hopes to have an opportunity to buy discounted water from Millerton Lake that would otherwise flow down the San Joaquin River and be lost to the Pacific Ocean.

Fresno City Council members unanimously voted Thursday to authorize a contract with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to purchase a share of “non-storable flood flows” — excess water that would be released to make room for more rainfall and snowmelt runoff behind Friant Dam — at a discount compared with the city’s normal water allotment from the San Joaquin River.

Brock Buche, director of public utilities for the city, told council members that Fresno has a standing contract for up to 60,000 acre-feet of water each year; the actual amount that the city gets depends on the overall volume of water made available to water contractors.

But in a season of heavy rainfall such as that experienced so far in 2023 and coming off years of drought, the city’s anticipation of non-storable water becoming available from the federal government is based on “more water coming into the dam than (the Bureau of Reclamation) can take advantage of,” Buche said.

While the city relies on surface water from both Millerton Lake and Pine Flat Reservoir to supply a pair of water treatment plants providing water to Fresno homes and businesses, the purchase of excess water from Millerton would be routed to the Fresno Irrigation District and the Fresno Metropolitan Flood Control District for storage in flood-control and groundwater recharge basins operated by the two agencies.

How much the water would cost is an unknown factor, however. Buche said that in previous years, the cost has been around $10 per acre-foot. An acre-foot is the volume of water necessary to cover one acre of area with one foot of water, or about 326,000 gallons. Buche added that the city’s budget includes about $2 million to cover the cost of purchasing water and for conveyance through canals to deliver it to Fresno.

City Manager Georgeanne White said the federal pricing is dynamic and subject to change. “The Bureau (of Reclamation) sets the price,” she said. “Right now everyone is trying to find a place to put water. … We won’t take more water than we can put (somewhere).”

White added that the city was only recently notified by the federal water agency that excess water is indeed expected to be made available to downstream water contractors such as the city.

Nelson Mandela, Yokuts and Mono Tribes statues announced at Fresno State’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. commemoration

During Fresno State’s annual commemoration of Martin Luther King Jr., Fresno State professor Sudarshan Kapoor announced that two new statues honoring Nelson Mandela and Native American tribes will be added to the Peace Garden within the next year.This will be the fourth and fifth statue at the garden, joining King Jr., César Chávez, Mahatma Gandhi and Jane Addams. Mandela served as the first president of South Africa and led the civil rights movement to end apartheid.Kapoor told The Collegian this is one ste...

During Fresno State’s annual commemoration of Martin Luther King Jr., Fresno State professor Sudarshan Kapoor announced that two new statues honoring Nelson Mandela and Native American tribes will be added to the Peace Garden within the next year.

This will be the fourth and fifth statue at the garden, joining King Jr., César Chávez, Mahatma Gandhi and Jane Addams. Mandela served as the first president of South Africa and led the civil rights movement to end apartheid.

Kapoor told The Collegian this is one step closer to a more diverse campus.

“I feel very strongly that this Peace Garden is a reflection of the diversity actually, this is our mission to celebrate diversity on this campus,” he said.

On Jan. 19, the Cross-Cultural and Gender Center (CCGC) and the African American Programs and Services hosted the event dedicated to King Jr. during the same week of MLK Day. The commemoration invited speakers and Fresno State community members to share their words honoring King Jr., ending with Kapoor decorating the statue with a ceremonial garland.

It was after the garland when Kapoor announced the additional statues to the Peace Garden. Fresno State President Saúl Jiménez-Sandoval, who was the first speaker of the event, said the addition is important to inspire students on campus.

“Seeing representation of civil rights leaders [and] world civil rights rulers in our Peace Garden, it really provides our students with a compass for the future,” Jiménez-Sandoval told The Collegian.

In addition to Mandela’s statue, Kapoor plans to add another in honor of the Tachi Yokut Tribe, who are native to the San Joaquin Valley, and The Mono Tribe, who originate in central Sierra Nevada.

The Yokuts have been battling for proper recognition throughout Fresno. After a two-year debate with Fresno County, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names voted to approve the renaming of the town Squaw Valley to Yokuts Valley, according to Fresnoland.

The new statue will serve as a reminder to students of the land’s origins and pays respects to the Yokut people.

“I think we should respect their viewpoints and remove all these names, which unnecessarily perpetuate prejudice and stereotypes,” Kapoor said.

“We all respect each other’s heritage as a tradition. We may have some differences, [but] we have to learn how to live with our differences and celebrate the thing that we really all enjoy,” Kapoor added.

“I think we should respect their viewpoints and remove all these names, which unnecessarily perpetuate prejudice and stereotypes,” Kapoor said.

The commemoration began at noon as the audience clung to their jackets and sweaters in 47-degree weather. Kayla Collins, a Fresno State student majoring in theatre, opened the event with the Black National Anthem, settling warmth to the cold-ridden crowd.

Jiménez-Sandoval followed Collins to talk about how the civil rights movement affected his own life. He said being an immigrant from Mexico, he couldn’t have the opportunity to stay and succeed in the United States without the activism African Americans had to fight hundreds of years for.

“I’m here because of the legacy of African Americans,” Jiménez-Sandoval said.

Following the university president was Kent Willis, the newly appointed vice president of student affairs, and Rashanda Booker, the first diversity officer at Fresno State. They made their way to the podium to speak about Martin Luther King Jr. and to introduce themselves in their new positions.

Marisa Williams and James Williams, student coordinators for CCGC, emceed the event.

For James Williams, this was his first event as a new student coordinator. He said he was nervous about facing a large crowd and national news media during a momentous event for the university. It was a “humbling experience” for him, he said.

He told The Collegian events like these are the reason he first joined CCGC.

“This job is so awesome and is to know more about my culture,” James Williams said.

This is Marisa Williams’ final semester as a student coordinator; she’ll be graduating this spring.

Upon presenting the next speakers, she momentarily stood in front of the podium and talked about how prideful she was to honor King Jr.’s legacy and to see a diverse set of speakers representing the Fresno State community, with tears of joy filling her eyes.

David Sandles, the Southern California regional director for CalStateTEACH, recited a poem for the crowd to thank Martin Luther King Jr.’s fight for racial justice and efforts in creating unity in diversity and freedom.

Kapoor, a philosophy professor and significant community figure in promoting peace, invited the crowd to recite a pledge against hate, with all of them chanting, “hate has no place in my heart, in my spirit.”

“Martin Luther King, he is my hero,” Kapoor said.

In 1959, when King Jr. and his wife, Corretta Scott, had visited India, Kapoor said he was there to listen to him speak.

Kapoor is also the founder of the Peace Garden and helped spearhead the installation of all the statues. Starting in 1990, the garden began with the statue of Gandhi, with King Jr’s being added later on.

Thirty years later, Kapoor is still adding new statues and still honoring King Jr.’s legacy.

“He is a champion of peace, love, and righteousness,” said Kapoor during the commemoration.

These two districts in Fresno County earned California’s ‘Distinguished Schools Award’

Know someone who also cares about these important education issues? Forward this newsletter to a friend or colleague - and they can sign up. Hey Bee readers! It’s Lasherica with the Education Lab, and this is the Jan. 25 edition of our weekly newsletter.In California, public school funding is based largely on the students a district serves. The more targeted students a district has, the more funding it gets. Targeted students are th...

Know someone who also cares about these important education issues?

Forward this newsletter to a friend or colleague - and they can sign up.

Hey Bee readers! It’s Lasherica with the Education Lab, and this is the Jan. 25 edition of our weekly newsletter.

In California, public school funding is based largely on the students a district serves. The more targeted students a district has, the more funding it gets. Targeted students are those living in poverty or are English learners, foster youth or homeless.

Simply put, the districts receive more funding because it takes more to educate those students.

Thanks to that funding formula, California districts in high poverty get 12% more funding than low-poverty/high-income districts, according to a recent finding.

That’s not the case for many school districts across the country.

The Education Trust, a national nonprofit working to close gaps for students of color and from low-income families, identified funding gaps between schools within states and across the nation.

“There are 37 states where districts that serve the highest concentrations of students from low-income backgrounds are not receiving substantially more funding than their more affluent counterparts,” Ed Trust found.

Ed Trust also determined that:

With even $800 more per student, according to Ed Trust’s research, a 500-student school could have hired at least three more teachers, bought a laptop for each student or offered targeted intensive tutoring.

When such funding gaps exist, it leaves districts with a higher need for resources without the funding to provide the needed services.

“Inequities in funding are foundational to inequities in student experiences,” Ed Trust CEO Denise Forte said. “We shouldn’t be surprised that students who attend underfunded schools don’t perform as well as their peers on national and state assessments.”

The lack of adequate funding in schools with high percentages of students from low-income backgrounds, students of color and English learners can prevent an investment in proven solutions to improve student outcomes, Ed Trust said.

CalMatters recently reported on a school funding proposal to achieve equity among students. Last year, a bill would have directed more funding to the student group with the lowest standardized test scores, which would have been Black students. Instead, the governor is proposing extra money for high-poverty schools, not Black students specifically.

But California districts serving the most students of color already receive 8.6% more funding than districts with the fewest students of color, according to Ed Trust.

Still, one student group struggles.

The Education Lab has covered how students, superintendents and school board members from across Fresno called out California’s failure to specifically fund the state’s lowest performing students — Black students. Last year’s bill was the third failed attempt to change that.

The proposed legislation said the lowest performing student group would receive additional funding until the group’s academic scores met or exceeded the highest performing student group. If another student group slipped to the bottom, that student group would also be eligible for the added funding.

So will the governor’s proposal be enough, CalMatters asked. Or will there be another legislative effort to make millions available annually for the state’s lowest performing students, which are currently and have historically been Black students?

Clovis schools begin search for new superintendent but is the deadline ‘too fast?’

While some districts use national searches lasting up to a year, Clovis Unified is looking to pick its next leader by March.

The school district recently discussed how to improve the quality of meals and reduce food waste in the district — a concern that’s top of mind for many students and their families.

When is an independent-study class overcrowded?

“We acknowledge that she needs to make the decisions that are right for her and for her family. She will be leaving with our full support and our encouragement.”

Two Fresno County schools were named 2023 California Distinguished Schools, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond announced.

Out of over 6,000 elementary schools statewide, Dry Creek Elementary in Clovis Unified and Kingsburg Elementary in Charter Lincoln Elementary School District were among the 356 distinguished schools.

“Since its inception in 1985, the California Distinguished Schools Award remains one of the important ways to celebrate exceptional schools, districts, teachers and classified employees for their innovation, talent and success in supporting students,” the California Department of Education said in an early January media release. “The exceptional elementary schools recognized this year are illustrative of the hard work, dedication and resilience shown by educators and schools across the state after communities struggled for multiple years with urgent effects to physical and mental health and unprecedented challenges to delivering education.”

This is the first year of the award recognition since the pandemic suspended state reporting of student data.

The state identifies schools by performance data on the state’s dashboard system, which measures assessment results, chronic absenteeism, suspension rates and socioeconomic data.

The awards program recognizes schools for either closing the achievement gap or achieving exceptional student performance.

The schools hold the distinction for two years.

Madera County will hold its 2023 Academic Decathlon events in February.

The 41st Annual Academic Decathlon speech, interview and Super Quiz competitions will be Saturday, Feb. 4 at Madera South High School.

UC Merced is celebrating its 20-Year anniversary of the campus groundbreaking.

Dozens of founding faculty and staff and hundreds from the UC Merced community are expected to be at the Wednesday morning celebration, where Chancellor Juan Sánchez Muñoz will discuss the state of the university.

The October 25, 2002, groundbreaking marked the beginning of UC Merced becoming the tenth UC campus, the university said in a media release about the event, which will be at the Dr. Vikram & Priya Lakireddy Grand Ballroom in the UC Merced conference center at 10 am.

A University of California Transitional Kindergarten Residency Program will be housed at UC Merced in a joint effort to “attract and prepare” more TK teachers for classrooms in the Central Valley and across the state, a media release from the college said.

The state intends to expand universal pre-k to 4-year olds by 2026.

“The governor will deliver for children and families only if we produce additional high-quality, pre-K teachers,” UC Merced Extension Director of Education Programs Mari Harris said. “The University of California can help lead this effort and assess what innovative forms of teacher training prove most effective.”

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing awarded the Merced County Office of Education $1.5 million to implement the program in partnership with the Merced, LA and Berkeley UC campuses. Los Angeles Unified and Oakland Unified will collaborate with the respective UC campuses to provide mentors and support during the yearlong residency.

Once approved by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the program plans to enroll about 20 candidates from each of the three focus areas of Merced, LA and Oakland every year, starting in summer 2024.

After being placed at a school site and teaching around 20 hours a week, the teacher residents will have the opportunity to become employed if they meet the additional program requirements.

“The hope is that experienced pre-K teachers, including those with years of experience in Head Start and other community-based programs, will also enroll to help advance their careers and receive better wages and benefits,” the UC Merced media release detailed.

The UC President’s Office also contributed $300,000 for fellowships for graduate-level teacher trainees, including students with DACA status.

Opinion: Kevin McCarthy learned the power of a loud minority. It happens in Clovis Unified, too

Here in Clovis, now part of McCarthy’s newly redistricted territory, we know all about loud voices in the minority who throw their weight around to get what they want — no matter who it impacts. | The Fresno Bee

As fewer faculty members are protected by tenure, they’re finding it harder to resist laws that ban certain racial topics. Their students suffer the consequences. | ProPublica

If you’ve made it to this point in the newsletter – the end – I hope you’ve enjoyed it. So forward it to someone else!

Southwest, other airlines packing planes to Fresno. Airport among best-performing in U.S.

Fresno was among the best-performing domestic air travel markets in the nation for three large U.S. airlines in October, with at least 90% of seats filled on their departing and arriving flights.Enilria.com, a website that crunches Federal Department of Transportation data on airlines and airports, reported that Southwest...

Fresno was among the best-performing domestic air travel markets in the nation for three large U.S. airlines in October, with at least 90% of seats filled on their departing and arriving flights.

Enilria.com, a website that crunches Federal Department of Transportation data on airlines and airports, reported that Southwest Airlines’ flights to and from Fresno Yosemite International Airport experienced an average “load factor” of 92% in October, the most recent month for which the federal data is available. That was tops among 107 airports for which information was provided.

United Airlines and American Airlines had slightly higher load factors for their flights serving Fresno, each with 94% of their seats filled during the month. For United Airlines, Fresno Yosemite International was ranked second among 155 airports listed. American Airlines’ traffic to and from Fresno had the third highest load factor out of 198 listed airports in October.

The figures represent mainline flights operated by each airline, rather than those provided under contract arrangements with Utah-based SkyWest Airlines. SkyWest flies to and from Fresno under the United Express and American Eagle brands, among others.

For SkyWest, the company’s Fresno flights had an average load factor of 91%, 18th out of 220 airports listed for the airline.

Of the other significant airlines with flights to and from Fresno for which data was available, Allegiant Air had the lowest load factor at about 70% – the second-lowest from among 78 airports on the list. Allegiant’s only destination from Fresno is Las Vegas.

For all commercial airlines combined, Fresno Yosemite International had a load factor of about 91% in October, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

The Enilria and Bureau of Transportation Statistics data predates the nationwide Christmas week travel meltdown, when flight schedules across the country were disrupted by a major winter storm that swept across the country. That storm, which resulted in flights delays and cancellations at major airport hubs in the Midwest and eastern U.S., also created ripple effects in other parts of the country when grounded flights stranded passengers waiting for connections to other airports. Southwest’s internal struggles contributed to a meltdown for days after the storms had passed.

Airline-specific information on passengers, flights and load factors at Fresno Yosemite International Airport for October includes:

This story was originally published January 25, 2023 7:30 AM.

Fresno Mayor warns residents of rising gas and electric rates

FRESNO, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – Rates for PG&E customers in Fresno could go up once again in 2023, pending approval by the California Public Utilities Commission.Fresno Mayor Jerry Dyer says over the next few months rates for PG&E customers will increase by 3 to 5 percent. But by September, if approved, PG&E customers could see a rate increase of 23.5%. together. It all adds up to an over 36% increase in prices in just one year.“Quit...

FRESNO, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – Rates for PG&E customers in Fresno could go up once again in 2023, pending approval by the California Public Utilities Commission.

Fresno Mayor Jerry Dyer says over the next few months rates for PG&E customers will increase by 3 to 5 percent. But by September, if approved, PG&E customers could see a rate increase of 23.5%. together. It all adds up to an over 36% increase in prices in just one year.

“Quite frankly I didn’t think the prior rates would pass. But we’ve seen a 39% increase over the last three years,” Dyer said.

Dyer said he’s concerned many in Fresno can’t afford these rate hikes.

“We have people in our city that are barely making ends meet. 1 out of 4 people live in poverty in the city of Fresno. And when you start talking about a 75 percent rate increase in PG&E rates over a 4-year period, that’s unacceptable,” he added.

He said he is planning on speaking to people with the company later this week.

A spokesperson from PG&E issued a statement about the rate hikes, but would not schedule an on-camera interview.

“PG&E does not mark up the cost of the gas and electricity that we purchase on behalf of our customers,” spokesperson Denny Boyles said.

In the statement, Boyles also said, IF voted on by the California public utilities commission, some people may even get money back from pg&e in the form of a statewide climate relief credit.

Still, Dyer said PG&E is unfairly raising rates and is getting away with it because there’s no competition.

Dyer also said, the extreme heat we see in Fresno also causes residents to have higher energy costs.

In the meantime, Dyer said the city is looking into a few options for solutions if the rates keep increasing. Including the possibility of Fresno starting a municipal energy company.

“We have a request for proposal out for a study to be done, for someone to provide us with information in terms of what are our options as a city when it comes to having a sole energy provider like PG&E. It is very apparent to me that when you have a monopoly like PG&E that is willing to continue to increase their rates regardless of what we believe regardless of whether or not we are able to afford those rate increases, something else has to be done,” Dyer said.

If you’d like to leave a comment or concern for the California public utilities commission about the PG&E proposed rate hikes, click here.

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