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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Fort Worth

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Fort Worth, TX. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Fort Worth's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Fort Worth. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Fort Worth, TX. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Fort Worth, TX

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Fort Worth,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Fort Worth, TX

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Fort Worth, TX

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Fort Worth, TX

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Fort Worth, TX, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Fort Worth, TX

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Fort Worth, TX

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Fort Worth, TX.

 Greek Grocery Store Fort Worth, TX

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Fort Worth, TX

Latest News in Fort Worth, TX

Creepy dolls keep washing up on this stretch on Texas coastline. ‘A lot of nightmares’

The dolls keep arriving, month after month, year after year.Where they come from is a mystery, but the waves bring them in and lay them on the Texas sand, where Mission-Aransas Reserve researchers find them.Were they lost or were they discarded? How long ago?The ocean takes its toll, covering their beady eyes with barnacles, stealing their plastic limbs, staining their hair green with algae.These dolls are creepy, Jace Tunnell says, and...

The dolls keep arriving, month after month, year after year.

Where they come from is a mystery, but the waves bring them in and lay them on the Texas sand, where Mission-Aransas Reserve researchers find them.

Were they lost or were they discarded? How long ago?

The ocean takes its toll, covering their beady eyes with barnacles, stealing their plastic limbs, staining their hair green with algae.

These dolls are creepy, Jace Tunnell says, and they won’t stop showing up.

Tunnell is the director of the Mission Aransas Reserve at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute. The Reserve, about 30 miles northeast of Corpus Christi, serves as a marine research and education program.

Situated on the Gulf Coast, Tunnell and his colleagues regularly survey a roughly 40-mile stretch of beach running from north Padre Island, up to Matagorda Island — an area the dolls seem to be drawn to.

“We’re actually doing scientific work, but the dolls are a perk,” Tunnell told McClatchy News in a phone interview.

Often, researchers are surveying the coast for sea turtles, marine mammals and endangered bird species. They comb the 40-mile span twice a week, coming across all kinds of debris in the process.

“Every day is something new,” Tunnell said. “Just when you think you’ve found everything that could possibly wash up on shore, something else comes up.”

Much of it is junk, some of it is interesting. The dolls occupy a category of their own, and Tunnell tries to document each of the eerie castaways on social media when they’re found.

“The creepiest are the ones that have lost all their hair,” Tunnell said, though each of the 30 dolls collected since he began keeping count have been disturbing in their own way.

“The first one we had found was a sex doll, the head of it. I posted a picture of it and I didn’t realize that’s what it was,” he said. “We got a lot of followers on the page after that.”

Someone purchased that doll head for $35, and Mission-Aransas gave the money to a sea turtle rescue program.

A surprising number of people want the dolls, offering to take them or buy them, Tunnell said.

“What are they doing with those things?” he wonders.

Those who keep up with Tunnell’s weekly debris updates seem to like the dolls. Most aren’t eager to buy one or take one home, but they follow along, seemingly fascinated and unnerved by the lost and forgotten toys.

Always creeps me out...at least this one has a body,” a commenter said about a recent discovery, posted April 22.

“She has pretty eyes for a change!” wrote another.

The baby doll is missing both arms and something appears to have chewed on its left leg.

“This one looks happy to be found! .... not like some of the others!” a comment read.

Post after post, people keep wondering the same thing: Why are so many dolls washing up in this specific place? Is this coastline cursed? Probably not, but it is a bit unlucky.

Through a two-year study conducted by the UT Marine Science Institute — of which Mission-Aransas is a part — researchers learned that the Texas Coastal Bend region is a junk magnet.

“Texas coastal bend beaches get 10 times the amount of trash … than any other beach in the Gulf of Mexico,” Tunnell said, compared to what researchers in Florida and Mississippi found after conducting identical projects.

This is due in large part to a “loop current” reaching from the Yucatan Peninsula to Florida. This current creates eddies that push debris toward the Texas Gulf, and the Coastal Bend in particular.

“There’s a lot of nightmares out there” in the debris, Tunnell said, more Barbies and Cabbage Patch Kids and so on. Odds are good they’ll keep making their way to Texas.

Tunnell doesn’t keep any of the eerie toys, he said, just tosses them in a bucket to be sold at a yearly fundraising auction.

“They could definitely be haunted,” he said.

Fort Worth-based Episcopal Church in North Texas announces it will pursue reunion with Diocese of Texas

[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church in North Texas, one year after a legal defeat forced the diocese to relinquish to a breakaway group the last of its former properties and its former identity as the Diocese of Fort Worth, is poised to combine with the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. L...

[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church in North Texas, one year after a legal defeat forced the diocese to relinquish to a breakaway group the last of its former properties and its former identity as the Diocese of Fort Worth, is poised to combine with the Episcopal Diocese of Texas. Leadership votes could take place as soon as June.

The plans were unveiled to Diocese of Texas clergy in a Zoom meeting April 20 and announced publicly on April 22 in a joint news release. If approved by the two Episcopal dioceses, their reunion then must be affirmed by a majority of bishops and standing committees of The Episcopal Church. It would not require action by General Convention because the Fort Worth-based diocese once was part of the Diocese of Texas.

“We are being welcomed gratefully and gladly into a diocese that shares our values,” the Rt. Rev. Scott Mayer, bishop provisional of North Texas, said in the news release. “We believe this reunion will strengthen both parties, equipping The Episcopal Church to reach the people of North Texas … more effectively with our message of God’s unconditional love.”

Conversations between leaders of the two dioceses have been underway since January, when North Texas’ Discernment Committee issued recommendations to its diocese’s standing committee that it pursue a reunion with the Houston-based Diocese of Texas. The North Texas standing committee voted on April 12 to formally engage in reunification discussions with Texas.

“As we move toward a new future together, we are unified by the love of Christ Jesus who prayed for us – that we all may be one and we are thankful for this reunion,” Texas Bishop Andrew Doyle said in the news release.

The Diocese of Texas is one of the largest in The Episcopal Church, with 167 congregations and 72,000 members. It already has two bishops suffragan and a bishop assistant, each assigned to a different region of the diocese. Although the two dioceses have yet to finalize details of a potential reunion, Doyle told clergy in his diocese that an additional regional bishop likely would be assigned to North Texas.

“Given that that area of the diocese would be one of the largest metropolitan areas, there’s going to be a need for a bishop resident,” Doyle said

Mayer likely would continue to assist North Texas in the interim, Doyle said. Mayer is the bishop diocesan of the adjacent Diocese of Northwest Texas and was elected bishop provisional of what then was known as the Diocese of Fort Worth in 2015. The Diocese of Northwest Texas is not involved in the reunion talks.

In North Texas, a 2008 diocesan schism greatly diminished the numbers of Episcopalians still faithful to The Episcopal Church. As of early this year, the Episcopal Church in North Texas counted 14 congregations and fewer than 4,000 members.

Bishop Scott Mayer celebrates Holy Eucharist at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Hillsboro, Texas, in December. The congregation has worshipped in a former bank drive-thru since June. Photo: Episcopal Church in North Texas

Once the two dioceses work out the legal details of a reunion, Mayer will call a special meeting of North Texas’ Diocesan Convention to vote on the plan, and Doyle will do the same with Texas’ Diocesan Council.

“There’s a lot of work to get done between now and then,” Doyle said in the clergy meeting, but he expressed hope for the future. “I’m really very excited about this, as are the rest of the staff. We’re excited about joining our friends in North Texas in mission.”

All six dioceses in the state of Texas have roots in the Diocese of Texas, which started in 1838 as a foreign missionary district. Texas, formerly part of Mexico and then an independent country, became a U.S. state in 1845, and the church’s missionary district organized as a diocese in 1849. The northern and western regions of the Diocese of Texas separated to become new missionary districts in 1874 in response to rapid population growth. In 1895, the northern district formed the Diocese of Dallas, which included congregations in Fort Worth and other cities to Dallas’ west.

The growing Diocese of Dallas was split in half in 1982, with the western congregations forming the new Diocese of Fort Worth. Once numbering more than 50 congregations, Fort Worth was long known as one of the most conservative dioceses in The Episcopal Church, particularly for its exclusion of women from ordination.

In 2008, a majority of clergy and lay leaders in the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth voted to leave The Episcopal Church over disagreements about the ordination of women and LGBTQ+ people. The breakaway group is now aligned with the Anglican Church in North America, or ACNA.

Most congregations that remained in The Episcopal Church found new places to worship after the split, but six congregations in Fort Worth, Hillsboro and Wichita Falls remained in their buildings. The Episcopal diocese sued in 2009 to regain and retain more than $100 million in diocesan property. In May 2020, the Texas Supreme Court sided with ACNA, and in February 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it wouldn’t review the case, letting ACNA’s victory stand.

The Episcopal diocese agreed to change its name to the Episcopal Church in North Texas, and in April 2021, the rest of its congregations were ordered out or chose to move out of the buildings that had been awarded to ACNA. Since then, Episcopal congregations and ACNA congregations have continued to argue in a lower court over what other property needs to be turned over to ACNA.

Doyle, in his meeting with clergy, acknowledged that the North Texas Episcopalians have “been through a lot,” and the Diocese of Texas was ready to offer “a giant embrace and bear hug.”

“We will be thinking about intentional ways we can help them feel welcome in our diocese,” Doyle said.

The last time a diocesan reunion occurred in The Episcopal Church was 2013, when the Diocese of Quincy reunited with the Diocese of Chicago in Illinois. The three dioceses in Wisconsin are in the middle of their own reunion talks, with plans to become one diocese again.

– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected].

‘Tinslee is home.’ Toddler discharged from Fort Worth hospital after lengthy legal battle

A Fort Worth 3-year-old who has spent most of her life at Cook Children’s Medical Center is home with her mother after a lengthy court battle, according to the Facebook page dedicated to the girl.Tinslee Lewis has received intensive care at the Fort Worth hospital for nearly her entire life. She was born premature and with a rare heart condition, and medical staff kept her alive through open heart surgery and a ventilator....

A Fort Worth 3-year-old who has spent most of her life at Cook Children’s Medical Center is home with her mother after a lengthy court battle, according to the Facebook page dedicated to the girl.

Tinslee Lewis has received intensive care at the Fort Worth hospital for nearly her entire life. She was born premature and with a rare heart condition, and medical staff kept her alive through open heart surgery and a ventilator.

When Tinslee was about 10 months old, a hospital ethics committee authorized removal of her life-sustaining treatment. Her mother, Trinity Lewis, had been in a legal battle with the hospital ever since as she fought for the right to decide whether her daughter lives or dies.

“I’m sorry but i can’t hold it in any longer,” Trinity Lewis posted on Facebook on Thursday. “Today my baby came home and I’m filled with joy and emotions right now. This journey have been nothing but hard and stressful and i am truly blessed i was able to do everything i can to bring her home.”

In the post, Lewis said Tinslee was doing well. She thanked her family, lawyers, various advocacy groups that have taken up her cause and Cook Children’s Medical Center for “doing everything y’all can to help keep my baby here i appreciate everything y’all have done truly!!!!”

Lewis, who has another daughter, said in her Facebook post that she was officially a “TWO CARSEAT MOM.”

Lewis’ post was shared to the Facebook page, “Tinslee Strong” with the caption, “Tinslee is home!!”

Tinslee Lewis has been the unknowing focus of a debate over who has the legal right to decide whether to continue a patient’s care. The Texas Advance Directives Act protects hospitals from legal repercussions, such as lawsuits, for making a decision about patient care that contradicts a family’s wishes.

A trial was initially set earlier this year for Tinslee’s case, on Jan. 25, but the trial was postponed. In court documents, both sides said they were looking into alternative solutions outside of the court of law.

In response to Tinslee’s return home, the Cook Children’s Health Care System issued this statement:

“The medical teams at Cook Children’s have dedicated their lives to healing children, and go to tireless lengths to do what they believe in their hearts and minds to be the very best decision for each and every patient.”

Texas Right to Life, an anti-abortion group, has supported Tinslee’s case. In a statement Tuesday, the group said it is grateful for everyone who banded together to help Tinslee get home.

“Cook Children’s worked with the family to improve Tinslee’s health to the point that she no longer needs a hospital setting for care,” the group said in a statement. “She is on home health care now and is doing great (she even gives her family kisses)!”

Texas Right to Life said Tinslee’s case is a “success story that shows in the absence of an anti-Life countdown, families and hospitals can work together for the benefit of the patient.”

Texas Right to Life has been an active opponent to the “10-Day Rule” included in the Texas Advance Directives Act. If doctors determine care is futile or medically inappropriate, a provision in the act allows an ethics committee to choose to end treatment 10 days after a family is notified, unless the family can find another hospital to take the patient. Supporters of the law say it allows physicians to make a difficult, but responsible, decision that families may not be able to accept. Those opposed say hospitals do not have the moral authority to decide who lives and dies.

The legal fight surrounding Tinslee began in October 2019, when Cook Children’s Ethics Committee voted unanimously to end Tinslee’s treatment. Under the Texas Advance Directives Act, the hospital is legally within its right to end treatment for a patient if the care is deemed futile. The hospital argued Tinslee’s treatment would not make her better and only prolonged her suffering.

Trinity Lewis, however, fought against the decision. She said her daughter was not suffering and she had hope she could improve. She and her attorneys filed for a restraining order against the hospital in November 2019. A judge granted the injunction, and the case has moved through multiple proceedings and appeals since then.

Tinslee’s case moved up through the courts, with each side appealing if the ruling was not in their favor. In January 2020, a judge ruled that Tinslee could be taken off life support after an emotional hearing in the 48th District Court in Fort Worth. In July 2020, the Second Appellate District of Texas in Fort Worth reversed that decision.

In October 2020, the Texas Supreme Court declined to review the hospital’s petition to take Tinslee off life support and in January 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the hospital’s plea, as well.

The case returned to the lower court for a final ruling. If the 48th District Court had ruled in favor of the hospital, medical staff could have ended Tinslee’s treatment. If the court sided with Tinslee’s mother, not only could the hospital not end her treatment, but the future of the Texas Advance Directives Act would also have been called into question.

The hospital asked the 48th District Court of Fort Worth to expedite the court process and schedule a trial for July 2021. But Lewis and her attorneys asked the courts for a January 2022 trial, saying they needed more time and the expedited process was not necessary because Tinslee’s condition was improving.

In court documents filed in May 2021, Lewis said her daughter was taking occupational therapy and she had been weaned off pain medication.

In September 2021, the case was scheduled for a trial date of Jan. 25, but the trial was delayed. In a status report on March 1, the parties said they were “working cooperatively to resolve the situation.”

This story was originally published April 12, 2022 4:38 PM.

26 things to do in North Texas this weekend: Watch the playoffs in Dallas, get on bended knee in Grand Prairie and celebrate the season in Fort Worth

From major sports events and springtime arts fests to shows from Boyz II Men and Coldplay, these are the top events happening across Dallas-Fort Worth this weekendDALLAS — This is a big weekend -- not just for Dallas sports fans, but also for your mother!Don't have any plans figured out for this weekend yet, let along Mother's Day on Sunday?Here are a few different options a whole array of people in your life can enjoy these next few days.It's NBA playoff season once again, and the Dallas Mavericks are in th...

From major sports events and springtime arts fests to shows from Boyz II Men and Coldplay, these are the top events happening across Dallas-Fort Worth this weekend

DALLAS — This is a big weekend -- not just for Dallas sports fans, but also for your mother!

Don't have any plans figured out for this weekend yet, let along Mother's Day on Sunday?

Here are a few different options a whole array of people in your life can enjoy these next few days.

It's NBA playoff season once again, and the Dallas Mavericks are in the midst of the Western Conference semifinals against the Phoenix Suns. It's not going great; the Mavs are down 2-0 in the series so far, so these upcoming home games -- the team also hosts the Suns at the AAC on Sunday -- will be critical if the team wants its playoff hopes to rebound. (Sorry.)

If you're an MFFL wanting to check out the Mavs as they continue their playoff push, click here for tickets.

Plus:

Listen up, sports fans: The Mavs aren't the only Dallas team in the middle of playoff season! The Stars are currently trying to make it through the first round of the NHL playoffs themselves and find themselves in a fight against the Calgary Flames. The team just managed to squeak past the Las Vegas Golden Knights in an overtime shootout to make it here, and they're going to have to come back from behind again now, as the Flames already lead the series 1-0.

To cheer on the Stars live against the Flames in the playoffs, click here for tickets.

Plus:

If your mom was alive and a teenager in the '90s, there's a pretty decent chance she was a fan of Boyz II Men. The group's ballads were in countless movies and TV shows throughout the decades, and they produced multiple smash hits on the radio throughout the years. Heck, this concert is even called "A Celebration for Mom" -- so, maybe check it out!

To get tickets to see Boyz II Men in concert, click here.

Plus:

Reyne Telles named Fort Worth's Chief Communications Officer

The City of Fort Worth has selected their first Chief Communications Officer, Reyne Telles. After a thorough national search, Telles has accepted the position and will officially assume this position on June 6.In his new position, Telles will oversee the city's Communications & Public Engagement Department, Governmental Relations and Educational Strategies Divisions and the City Manager's administrative staff.Telles has more than two decades of professional experience and, most recently, was vice president and Public Sector...

The City of Fort Worth has selected their first Chief Communications Officer, Reyne Telles. After a thorough national search, Telles has accepted the position and will officially assume this position on June 6.

In his new position, Telles will oversee the city's Communications & Public Engagement Department, Governmental Relations and Educational Strategies Divisions and the City Manager's administrative staff.

Telles has more than two decades of professional experience and, most recently, was vice president and Public Sector Practice leader with Cooksey Communications. Telles guided Cooksey’s governmental clients through in-depth communications audits, institutional planning and execution of engagement approaches that target and reach key stakeholders.

“Fort Worth’s positive vibe is grounded in the community’s vitality, a collective sense of purpose, rich history and genuine authenticity. I hope to carry forward that authenticity by emphasizing ways the City of Fort Worth uses two-way communication to engage, inform and listen to residents,” Telles said. “It is an exciting and dynamic time in the City of Fort Worth, which makes me even more enthusiastic about the possibilities. I appreciate City Manager David Cooke and the vision to create this new role and look forward to joining the team.”

Prior to Cooksey Communications, Telles spent six years as the executive director of communications and community engagement for the Austin Independent School District, where he led marketing, stakeholder and communications efforts that supported 130 schools and 81,000 students. He managed a department of more than 40 employees, which included a Lone Star Emmy-nominated, 24/7 public access television station, as well as the team responsible for the outreach and messaging behind a successful $1.1 billion bond (the largest in Central Texas history by any public sector entity at the time).

Telles also spent six years with the City of Austin, the 11th-largest municipality in the country, as their media relations manager, where he earned recognition multiple times from the Texas Association of Municipal Information Officers for Best Media Relations and Best Social Media. He has also served as the director of communications for Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell, building an executive-level communications plan and securing an appearance for the mayor on "Jimmy Kimmel Live."

In addition to having FEMA-National Incident Management System training and strong Emergency Operations Center experience, he has worked as a political reporter with a CBS affiliate, as a press secretary with the New Mexico Legislature and in nonprofit communications. He received his bachelor’s degree in communication and political science from Eastern New Mexico University and his master’s degree from the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin.

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