MediterraneanGrocery Wholesalers in Fort Worth, TX

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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Fort Worth

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Fort Worth, TX. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Fort Worth's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Fort Worth. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Fort Worth, TX. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Fort Worth, TX

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Fort Worth,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Fort Worth, TX

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Fort Worth, TX

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Fort Worth, TX

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Fort Worth, TX, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Fort Worth, TX

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Fort Worth, TX

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Fort Worth, TX.

 Greek Grocery Store Fort Worth, TX

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Fort Worth, TX

Latest News in Fort Worth, TX

Construction of Texas A&M-Fort Worth to Begin This Spring

Texas A&M University officials shared new details Thursday afternoon in the development of their research campus coming to downtown Fort Worth.A&M Chancellor John Sharp said construction will begin soon on Texas A&M-Fort Worth, the name they've selected for the three-building complex to be built near the Fort Worth Convention Center and Fort Worth Water Gardens, o...

Texas A&M University officials shared new details Thursday afternoon in the development of their research campus coming to downtown Fort Worth.

A&M Chancellor John Sharp said construction will begin soon on Texas A&M-Fort Worth, the name they've selected for the three-building complex to be built near the Fort Worth Convention Center and Fort Worth Water Gardens, on the same site as the existing Texas A&M School of Law.

Texas A&M-Fort Worth is planned to offer a range of programs from Texas A&M University, Tarleton State University, and several A&M System agencies.

“A top-10 public research institution ensures Fort Worth’s future is rooted in the next economy driven by an educated workforce, whether it be lawyers, engineers, health care professionals or technology workers whose jobs don’t even exist today,” said Sharp. “Thanks to our partners, the city of Fort Worth and Tarrant County, the Texas A&M System is investing in a unique public-private sector endeavor that will be a magnet for economic growth for the North Texas region.”

Sharp said Thursday that construction on Texas A&M-Fort Worth will begin later this summer on the first building, the Law & Education Building. The addition is expected to be completed in 2025 and will be financed with bonds backed by the Permanent University Fund and other unnamed sources.

The other two facilities at Texas A&M-Fort Worth, the Research and Innovation building and the Gateway conference center and offices, will be financed with city-issued bonds secured by leases to the A&M System and private sector development firms.

The university said in a statement Thursday that the "unique financing system will allow the campus to be constructed in about a third of the 15 years it would take for the A&M System to do it alone."

Start dates for the Research and Innovation building and Gateway conference center and offices have not been announced.

Fort Worth, according to a statement released Thursday, is the largest city in the state that does not have a significant presence by a large public research university. Two years ago city and county officials were joined by local business leaders in inviting the university to bring a research facility to Cowtown.

In November 2021, the university announced plans to build a top-tier research campus on its land downtown -- a development at the time dubbed "Aggieland North."

The planned research campus will include a high-rise complex that will house classrooms, labs, research and "maker" spaces that can be used by the public and private sectors for academic programs, workforce training and collaborative research.

Sharp said Stantec will serve as the architect of record for the Law & Education building with design architect Pelli Clarke & Partners assisting with labs. Construction management teams include Turner Construction Company, CARCON Industries, Source Building Group Inc., and Dikita Enterprises.

‘Aggieland North': Texas A&M to Build Research Campus in Downtown Fort Worth

North Texas could be home to nuclear power plant until 2053. Why are residents opposed?

There’s no escaping the fact that Terry McIntire’s family farm sits less than four miles from the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant. Every time the Fort Worth resident visits Somervell County to take care of his 96-year-old father, he drives past a warning siren installed near his family cemetery.“Most people probably don’t even think about it,” McIntire said. “But if there’s an accident, the 10-mile perimeter includes all of Glen Rose and all of our family property. The air would be unsafe to...

There’s no escaping the fact that Terry McIntire’s family farm sits less than four miles from the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant. Every time the Fort Worth resident visits Somervell County to take care of his 96-year-old father, he drives past a warning siren installed near his family cemetery.

“Most people probably don’t even think about it,” McIntire said. “But if there’s an accident, the 10-mile perimeter includes all of Glen Rose and all of our family property. The air would be unsafe to breathe, and probably the land would be uninhabitable forever.”

Comanche Peak’s future in North Texas is also in the air as the plant’s owner, Vistra, petitions the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to keep reactors online through at least 2053. The company’s current licenses for two nuclear units, which have the capacity to power 1.2 million homes under normal electricity conditions, expire in 2030 and 2033, respectively.

The plant has had a massive presence – both physically and economically – in Somervell County, about 50 miles southwest of Fort Worth, since construction began on nuclear reactors in 1974. Vistra says Comanche Peak is the county’s largest taxpayer, accounting for more than $30 million in state and local taxes per year and more than 600 full-time employees.

Nuclear energy is uniquely positioned to provide reliable, carbon-free power to a country searching for cleaner sources of electricity, Jim Burke, president and CEO of Vistra, said in an October announcement. (While nuclear energy does not produce carbon dioxide, construction of the plants and the transportation of uranium and nuclear waste generates emissions, researchers have found).

“Renewing the licenses of this plant is critical for grid reliability and our environment and is a benefit to the economy, the local community, and our company,” Burke said. “Our team stands ready to continue a proud tradition of safety, dependability, and operational excellence at Comanche Peak, and we are excited to be filing this application for extension.”

That view isn’t shared by all living in the 50-mile radius of the plant, including Tarrant, Hood and Somervell counties. Several residents have expressed concern over safety measures and the plant’s long-term sustainability amid challenges posed by aging infrastructure, drought and low-level earthquakes.

Both of Comanche Peak’s reactors are pressurized-water reactors. “These reactors pump water into the reactor core under high pressure to prevent the water from boiling,” according to the Department of Energy.

“The water in the core is heated by nuclear fission and then pumped into tubes inside a heat exchanger. Those tubes heat a separate water source to create steam. The steam then turns an electric generator to produce electricity. The core water cycles back to the reactor to be reheated and the process is repeated.”

At a Jan. 17 virtual public meeting hosted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nearly 100 attendees asked questions about how the commission will evaluate the plant’s environmental impact and shared their experiences with Comanche Peak.

Janet Mattern, a southwest Fort Worth resident living within 50 miles of the plant, said the commission has an obligation to educate the public about the risks of extending the life of the reactors. Mattern also serves on the board of the League of Women Voters of Tarrant County.

Recent reports have stated that when nuclear power plants were initially approved in the ‘80s and ‘90s that the NRC underestimated the risks to public safety at that time,” Mattern said. “We need to make sure that those risks are communicated to the public prior to the renewal of this license.”

Susybelle Gosslee, chair on hazardous waste issues for the League of Women Voters of Texas, asked the NRC to consider how the increasing frequency of drought conditions could lead to more wildfires and limit the availability of water for plant operations. Rita Beving of Dallas urged agency staff to dig into how natural gas drilling in the region could lead to more earthquakes near the plant.

Beving expressed concern that the plant’s safety measures did not account for higher seismic activity, which researchers have connected to deep injection wells and fracking.

“This plant needs further scrutiny and further evaluation,” Beving said. “Even though I know officials have been very pleased with this plant, everyone should be very concerned as this plant ages since some of its components have been around since the 1980s.”

Before the meeting, Vistra spokesperson Meranda Cohn said there is a considerable safety margin between seismic activity the plant is built to handle and any potential seismic activity in the area. All recorded earthquakes in the area have fallen well within that margin, Cohn said.

There is no potential for “toxic runoff” at Comanche Peak, she added. The plant must constantly release water from Squaw Creek Reservoir into the Brazos River, and the water is routinely monitored to ensure it meets state and federal standards, Cohn said.

“Our highest priority is the safety of the public, our people, and our plants,” Cohn wrote. “Comanche Peak is designed to meet the stringent requirements of the NRC, and it meets all codes, standards, and regulations with respect to safe operations and environmental impacts.”

Comanche Peak also received testimonies of support from community leaders, including Glen Rose ISD Superintendent Trig Overbo and Somervell County Judge Danny Chambers. Plant staff have always been good neighbors, Chambers said, and county staff are regularly in contact with Comanche Peak leaders.

Public comments on the Comanche Peak environmental impact review can be submitted at regulations.gov under Docket ID: NRC-2022-0183 or by mail to the following address: Office of Administration Mailstop: TWFN-7-A60M U.S. Nuclear Regulatory CommissionWashington, D.C. 20555-0001

Requests for extensions to the hearing and comment deadlines can be sent to [email protected].

Residents with concerns should visit the plant’s visitors’ center and get their questions answered, he added.

“I don’t have anything bad to say because obviously Somervell County wouldn’t be what it is today without the power plant and without what is injected into our community through the workforce, through the financial output,” Chambers said. “There’s no reason for it not to go on because I don’t know how you’d replace what it puts on the grid without it here today.”

Technical issues prevented several people from unmuting their microphones to ask questions or comment over the course of the meeting, which lasted for more than two hours. The commission originally planned two in-person public meetings in Glen Rose on Jan. 10 but moved the session online due to COVID-19 concerns.

Attendees urged commission staff to host an in-person meeting and delay their deadlines to submit comments or apply for a public hearing. Public comments are due by email or mail by Jan. 30, as are requests for public hearings. Instructions to apply for a public hearing are published on The Federal Register.

“I thank you very much for doing this particular meeting online, but even some of these people have not had access to express their comments,” Gosslee, the League of Women Voters of Texas member, said. “There needs to be a public hearing for the people that live close to it and for the people who live many miles away.”

To qualify for a hearing, members of the public must explain why they’re affected by a nuclear facility and the reasons why they believe a proposed action raises environmental or safety questions, according to NRC guidelines. Scott Burnell, a public affairs officer for the NRC who answered questions at the meeting, said people typically have to show proximity to the plant by being located within a 50-mile radius of the reactor.

McIntire, who stands to inherit his family farm in Somervell County, doesn’t expect the efforts of activists to stop the relicensing of the project. But the NRC should exercise more oversight of the plant – and find a permanent storage location for nuclear waste so that it doesn’t stay in Glen Rose, he said.

“The best we can do is hope that it’ll be safer, and there will be better oversight for the next 20 years,” McIntire said.

Haley Samsel is the environmental reporter for the Fort Worth Report. Her position is supported by a grant from the Marilyn Brachman Hoffman Foundation. Contact her by email or via Twitter.

At the Fort Worth Report, news decisions are made independently of our board members and financial supporters. Read more about our editorial independence policy here.

Will Fort Worth, Tarrant County schools close when snow falls Tuesday? Here’s what we know

With freezing weather and possible bad road conditions forecast late Tuesday afternoon into the evening, parents and students should prepare for potential school closings or delays.Here’s what to know so far about weather-related school closings in Tarrant County, including when and how you’ll be notified.As of 5 p.m. Monday, no districts had announced delays or closures, but they said they would conti...

With freezing weather and possible bad road conditions forecast late Tuesday afternoon into the evening, parents and students should prepare for potential school closings or delays.

Here’s what to know so far about weather-related school closings in Tarrant County, including when and how you’ll be notified.

As of 5 p.m. Monday, no districts had announced delays or closures, but they said they would continue to monitor the weather to assess whether that will be necessary.

Aledo ISD: “We are and will continue to monitor the weather,” spokesperson Mercedes Mayer said. If any change is necessary, the district will notify the community by 5:30 a.m.

Arlington ISD: Arlington ISD will continue to monitor the weather forecast for Tuesday, spokesperson Anita Foster said. If any changes to school schedules are needed, the district will assess that tomorrow.

Birdville ISD: At this time, it will be a normal school day, said spokesperson Mark Thomas. The district usually makes a decision about delaying or closing by 5:30 a.m. the day of. If the superintendent decides to delay or close schools, the district’s phone messaging system will be activated and the major radio and television stations will be notified. Also, the district will post this information on the website, Facebook, Twitter, Birdville ISD News and the main voicemail at 817-547-5700. BISD only posts these notifications if school is delayed or closed — not if it is open as usual. Visit birdvilleschools.net/weatherprocedures for more information.

Carroll ISD: At this time, the district does not have any notices to share. They will continue to monitor weather conditions along with the City of Southlake’s Emergency Management team, and will keep parents posted should there be a delay or cancellation. Any changes to school and office schedules will be communicated before 6 a.m. on Tuesday. Weather-related school closings and delays will be communicated to employees and parents via the district’s emergency telephone notification system. To update your emergency contact information, contact your child’s school. Follow @Carrollisd on Twitter for immediate alerts and notices using the #SAFEdragon hashtag. The district will also post closings to the district’s website, Facebook page and Mobile Dragon app.

Castleberry ISD: District administration is monitoring the weather as it develops over the next 24 hours. In the event of a delay or closure due to weather, the district will communicate this information by following the emergency procedure outlined on their website. Parents should continue to check the district website, social media sites and Canvas for updates. To update your contact information for use with the mass-messaging system, visit the Contact Preferences page.

Eagle Mountain Saginaw ISD: District leaders are closely monitoring the area forecast for Tuesday, a spokesperson said. At this time, the weather is not expected to impact road conditions or facility operations. All classes and activities will continue as scheduled on Tuesday. The district will remain in close contact with local emergency management officials and will continue monitoring conditions. More details about the inclement weather process and procedures are available.

Everman ISD: At this time, the district is monitoring the weather and will continue to monitor the weather. They will keep everyone posted via social media and the mass communication system.

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD: At this time, there have been no changes to the Tuesday schedule at GCISD. Should schools close, the district will communicate early morning Tuesday through phone, email, the district website and social media. Inclement weather procedures can be found here.

Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD: HEB ISD has a specific process for deciding school closures due to weather conditions, which begins at 4 a.m. on the day in question. They customarily make those decisions prior to school buses making their runs on the day of potential severe weather. To receive official notice of inclement weather closures, subscribe to HEB ISD eNews to get an email announcement, or visit Facebook or Twitter for social media updates. It will also be posted on the district website.

Keller ISD: Keller ISD does not currently have any plans to close schools or start late Tuesday. They will continue to monitor the weather situation overnight, and will have operations personnel checking road conditions early Tuesday. Any decision about closing or delaying will be made before 5:30 a.m. Tuesday morning. Go here for more information.

Kennedale ISD: The weather will not warrant a delayed start, a district spokesperson said.

Lake Worth ISD: The district has not made a decision regarding tomorrow yet. Families should ensure that the district has up-to-date contact information so that they may provide updates as they occur.

Mansfield ISD: As of Monday afternoon, there was no Tuesday closure announcement. Families will be notified via email, text, the district website and social media platforms.

Northwest ISD: The district does not have plans to cancel or delay school tomorrow based on current forecasts. Spokesperson Anthony Tosie says the district always monitors the weather and informs families of closings typically no later than 5:30 a.m. the day of any closing. Inclement weather procedures can be found here. The district plans to send families communication Monday reminding them of inclement weather procedures as they have in the past around this time of year.

White Settlement ISD: They will monitor the weather throughout the day and evening. There are no plans to delay at this point.

This story was originally published January 23, 2023 4:19 PM.

Dallas-Fort Worth resi market had chilly holiday season

(Getty)Supply in North Texas has peaked, but buyers aren’t biting as much. In December, the housing supply in North Texas reached its highest level of the year with a three-month supply — a nearly 280 percent increase from year-end 2021, according to the latest Re/Max National Housing Report. Conversely, home sales dropped almost 32 percent compared to 2021, the Dallas Business Journal reports....

(Getty)

Supply in North Texas has peaked, but buyers aren’t biting as much. In December, the housing supply in North Texas reached its highest level of the year with a three-month supply — a nearly 280 percent increase from year-end 2021, according to the latest Re/Max National Housing Report. Conversely, home sales dropped almost 32 percent compared to 2021, the Dallas Business Journal reports.

Despite a 90-day supply, the average home in Dallas-Fort Worth sat on the market for 56 days in December before selling, which is 23 days longer than in December 2021.

“I have never seen a year like 2022,” says Mark Wolfe, president and owner of Re/Max DFW Associates. “The first five months of 2022 were upbeat, with sales increasing. The last five months were exactly reversed. It has been a see-saw.”

In April, home sales in the region were up 46 percent over the previous year, Wolfe said. By November, sales were down 43 percent compared to the same period in 2021.

Few sellers are lowering their prices to adjust for this wonky supply-and-demand ratio, however. Home sale prices fell 0.7 percent between November and December, however they were still 6.4 percent higher than in December 2021.

“I am hopeful that we are reaching a normal market, rather than a boom or bust market,” Wolfe said.

With a turbulent 2022 behind them, the realtors of Dallas-Fort Worth are optimistic about 2023.

In an economic outlook event in Dallas this week, Chris Kelly, president and CEO of Ebby Halliday Companies, said the Dallas-Fort Worth housing market this year will likely be a mirror image of 2022, starting slowly then accelerating in the second half of the year.

In Zillow’s latest 2023 forecast, Dallas-Fort Worth was the only Texas metro area to make the top 10. The metro ranked fourth behind Charlotte, Cleveland and Pittsburgh. That said, “this year’s hottest markets will feel much chillier than they did a year ago,” Anushna Prakash, economic data analyst at Zillow, said in the report.

“The desire to move hasn’t changed, but both buyers and sellers are frozen in place by higher mortgage rates, slowing the housing market to a crawl,” Prakash said. “Markets that offer relative affordability and room to grow are poised to stand out, especially given the prevalence of remote work.”

Maddy Sperling

Tarrant County carnival ride operator is on track for buying, restarting Forest Park Miniature Train

The Forest Park Miniature Train soon will return as a new investor works to buy the Fort Worth attraction.Mary Talley, Talley Amusements vice president, told the Fort Worth Report she is in the process of purchasing the train and refurbishing the equipment to get it running again.Once the purchase is finalized, Talley plans to modernize the miniature train with digital ticketing and a souvenir stand. Although there is no official opening date, Talley sa...

The Forest Park Miniature Train soon will return as a new investor works to buy the Fort Worth attraction.

Mary Talley, Talley Amusements vice president, told the Fort Worth Report she is in the process of purchasing the train and refurbishing the equipment to get it running again.

Once the purchase is finalized, Talley plans to modernize the miniature train with digital ticketing and a souvenir stand. Although there is no official opening date, Talley said, the wait will be worth it.

“We’re just going to make this thing bigger and better,” she said. “I’m going to improve upon it, and I’m sure the public is going to love it.”

Haltom City-based Forest Park Rides Inc. operated the park’s train since the late 1950s. The five-mile miniature railway runs through Forest Park and crosses the Trinity River.

The train closed in March 2022 because of equipment issues and the declining health of Forest Park Rides Inc. President Raymond Hames. Hames did not respond to three phone call requests to comment from the Fort Worth Report.

Talley’s purchase of the train is sentimental. Her great-grandfather was an early stockholder of Forest Park Rides Inc., she said. Talley is excited to buy a company in which her great grandfather was involved, she said.

The city sent a notice to the Forest Park Rides Inc. because it was not following the agreement made with the municipal government, Dave Lewis, interim director for Fort Worth’s Parks and Recreation department, said.

“We’ve heard a lot from the public that it’s a very important visitor experience for not only our residents but when our residents have guests from out of town,” Lewis said.

The agreement stated that the Forest Park train would have to operate Saturday and Sunday, depending on the weather, and send to the city a log of when the train was running, Lewis said. The train broke the agreement by lying dormant for more than a year.

The city set an initial deadline of Oct. 26 for restarting the train. The company then requested and received an extension through March 23.

One Fort Worth resident looking forward to the reopening is Beth “Bee” Engelhardt, 69. She grew up with the miniature train and wanted to become a train engineer. However, women were not allowed in that field of work at the time so she opted to ride it instead.

Engelhardt’s father would take her to ride on the weekends, she recalled. Now, with the train’s closure, she said she misses the locomotive chugging through the park whenever she passes by.

“You felt the wind through your hair,” she said. “For a girl, that was cool. Back then, we didn’t get to do a lot of daring, speedy things.”

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