MediterraneanGrocery Wholesalers in Colorado Springs, CO

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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Colorado Springs

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Colorado Springs, CO. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market - to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Colorado Springs's leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you're looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Colorado Springs. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it's easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Colorado Springs, CO. We're proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We're here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That's why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain
Mediterranean Grocery Colorado Springs, CO

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Colorado Springs,
what are we talking about?

 Mediterranean Supermarkets Colorado Springs, CO

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

 Mediterranean Grocery Store Colorado Springs, CO

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

 Middle Eastern Grocery Colorado Springs, CO

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Colorado Springs, CO, you won't want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it's no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

 Mediterranean Food Stores Colorado Springs, CO

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It's best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party - you're almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

 Middle Eastern Market Colorado Springs, CO

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason - this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Colorado Springs, CO.

 Greek Grocery Store Colorado Springs, CO

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That's because it's considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there's one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you're looking to make some positive changes in your life, this "diet" is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures' foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke - especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery - we're always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It's refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn't have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don't start with meats and sweets.

4.

They're tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you're essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That's great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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 Middle Eastern Store Colorado Springs, CO

Latest News in Colorado Springs, CO

Firefighters help evacuate 100+ residents from Colorado Springs senior living facility following power outage

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - More than 100 seniors had to be evacuated from their homes after their building lost power Monday afternoon.Firefighters responded to the Regency Tower Apartments near 8th Street and Cheyenne Boulevard about 3:30 p.m. on reports of a structure fire. Instead of finding flames, they found the entire 11-story building pitch black.The outage effectively cut heat and elevator access, along with electricity, to the 130+ residents living in Regency Tower.“Absolutely it’s a concern,&r...

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - More than 100 seniors had to be evacuated from their homes after their building lost power Monday afternoon.

Firefighters responded to the Regency Tower Apartments near 8th Street and Cheyenne Boulevard about 3:30 p.m. on reports of a structure fire. Instead of finding flames, they found the entire 11-story building pitch black.

The outage effectively cut heat and elevator access, along with electricity, to the 130+ residents living in Regency Tower.

“Absolutely it’s a concern,” said Lt. Aaron McConnellogue with the Colorado Springs Fire Department.

Over the next several hours, firefighters worked to get all the tenants out of the building. Because of the size of the building and with much of the operation taking place after sunset, crews had to set up lights to help them maneuver around. Lighting was the least of the obstacles, McConnellogue told 11 News.

“We’ve got lights set up, so we’re able to navigate, find their way around. The challenge has been trying to get people from 10th to the 11th floor all the way down with no functioning elevators. So we’re using equipment, there’s some people that we’re having to carry with some of our equipment stair chairs to move them all the way down the stairs, so it’s just a really slow process right now.”

All while racing against both the clock and the cold.

“The crews are doing OK because they’re inside and working hard right now, like I said, between carrying and assisting and moving people,” McConnellogue said about midway through the evacuation process when asked how the firefighters were faring without heat in the building.

#ColoradoSpringsFire is on scene of a power outage at the Regency 55+ Plus Hotel 921 Green Star Dr. Power will be out for the next 2 days at the hotel. CSFD is evacuating the entire building and assisting non-mobile residents from upper floors. CSFD has 25 firefighters in scene. pic.twitter.com/xTsdZrNjJ1

— CSFD PIO (@CSFDPIO) January 24, 2023

The fire department organized with the Red Cross to get food to the residents during the evacuation. Paramedics and an ambulance were also on scene just in case anyone had an emergency.

By 10, firefighters had everyone out of the building. CSFD says residents will be staying with family members or in hotels until power is restored -- something that could take a couple of days. According to Colorado Springs Utilities, the electrical issue is on the Regency Tower’s side, meaning the owners will have to hire a contractor to make repairs before utility crews can turn the power back on.

Copyright 2023 KKTV. All rights reserved.

New Southern-style chicken salad chain restaurant ready to roost in Colorado Springs

Got chicken?Expansion-minded national and regional chicken restaurant chains have recognized Colorad ........p Tqsjoht’ sbqje hspxui jo sfdfou zfbst boe gmpdlfe up upxo xjui b wbsjfuz pg dpodfqut: gsjfe, hsjmmfe boe spujttfsjf tuzmf; ufoefst, xjoht boe tboexjdift; cbscfdvfe, nbsjobufe boe tqjdz.Opx, bopuifs dijdlfo ofxdpnfs jt hfuujoh sfbez up spptu jo uif Tqsjoht.Dijdlfo Tbmbe Dijdl, b tpvuifso-tuzmf, gbtu-dbtvbm sftubvsbou dpodfqu uibu tqfdjbmjaft jo jut tjhobuvsf dijdlfo tbmbe ejtift, xjmm pqfo jut gjstu Dpmpsbe...

Got chicken?

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Colorado Springs City Council approves controversial water rule

The Colorado Springs City Council tweaked and approved a controversial water ordinance Tuesday that will benefit existing developers within the city and could block large annexations planning to build new neighborhoods.The updated ordinance will require Colorado Springs Utilities to have 128% of the water necessary to serve existing city demand and the projected demand from new properties. Two weeks ago, the City Council backed a 130% water standard. The slightly lower buffer would allow the city to annex 8,500 homes, up from 4,200 ho...

The Colorado Springs City Council tweaked and approved a controversial water ordinance Tuesday that will benefit existing developers within the city and could block large annexations planning to build new neighborhoods.

The updated ordinance will require Colorado Springs Utilities to have 128% of the water necessary to serve existing city demand and the projected demand from new properties. Two weeks ago, the City Council backed a 130% water standard. The slightly lower buffer would allow the city to annex 8,500 homes, up from 4,200 homes, said Abby Ortega, general manager of planning.

The council also committed to study regional water needs more holistically. Numerous neighborhoods in El Paso County rely on diminishing groundwater and may need water from Colorado Springs Utilities in the future.

The lower buffer passed on a 6-3 vote after extensive testimony on both sides of the issue. Many who testified pointed out the need to protect the city during the Colorado River's megadrought and how it could push up the price of housing and force more building out into the county on diminishing groundwater. Councilmembers Dave Donelson, Bill Murray and Mike O'Malley voted against the ordinance.

Mayor John Suthers backed the water rule, saying it addresses questions about water availability residents constantly ask him.

"Our citizens want a clear message that we are looking out for them, that we know how much water we have, we know how much water we are using and we are going to maintain a buffer between the two," Suthers said.

Suthers explained a proposed annexation of 3,200 acres east of Fountain, known as Amara, prompted Colorado Springs Utilities to look more closely at how many people it can serve. He believed based on statements by Utilities leadership it could serve 800,000 when a pipeline from Pueblo Reservoir was complete. Utilities told him and others it can serve 670,000 people now.

"That was a huge wake-up call," he said.

The new estimate prompted Norwood Development Group, the most powerful developer in town, to float the idea of asking voters to adopt a more restrictive water rule.

Norwood's measure would have required Colorado Springs Utilities to have enough water, an estimated 125,000 to 130,000 acre-feet, for the properties within the city to develop before allowing annexations, a measure that could block the city from adding property for 20 to 30 years, Suthers said. The proposal would prioritize water service to developments within the city — including the 18,000 acres in Banning Lewis Ranch owned by Norwood on the eastern edge of town.

"Did I have some difficult conversations with Norwood? You bet," Suthers told the council.

Donelson successfully proposed reducing the water buffer Utilities must provide from 130% to 128%, noting that the Housing and Building Association asked for a lower standard. He was also among those who called for more time to better understand the implications of the rule and how it could drive up the cost of housing.

He called it "too big of a decision to run into at the prodding of one developer."

Former El Paso County Planning Director Craig Dossey said the county's planning efforts, including the city's intergovernmental agreement with the county, was intended to guide dense neighborhoods to annexing into the city to help prevent neighborhoods from relying on groundwater.

"It is a dire outlook when you are talking about water providers in the county," said Dossey, president of Vertex Consulting Services, a Colorado Springs-based planning and land development company.

The Pikes Peak Regional Water Authority was set up to work on some regional groundwater concerns and reuse plans. For example, Colorado Springs Utilities, Monument and six groundwater districts started work last year to see if they could reuse groundwater. Instead of using groundwater once, treating it and then allowing it to flow into local creeks, the group planned to study if the water could be captured downstream and used again.

Acting Utilities CEO Travas Deal said the new rule could help in discussions with regional water providers, such as those in the authority.

"If you want to bring people to the table, you have to have something to start with," he said.

Several critics noted the starting point does not need to be an adopted ordinance.

The council also seriously considered delaying a vote on the rule until September, proposed by Councilwoman Nancy Henjum.

Henjum, who voted for the water rule two weeks ago, proposed the delay to form a regional water task force in March that could deliver recommendations by September.

The task force had broad support, but a delay did not. Henjum could have forced the delay as the swing vote, but voted against her own motion to delay.

She said she leaned on the recommendation from Utilities' to adopt the new water buffer in her decision.

However, she also expected a new task force to drive "a regional collaborative conversation."

The council did not commit to a date to setting up a new task force and in April the city will have a new mayor and four new city councilmembers, who often face a steep learning curve.

Green Box January Artist in Residence Stilhouse Junkies to perform at UCCS Ent Center for the Arts

GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS • Arriving a day late due to winter weather and road conditions, the Stillhouse Junkies safely made the 300-mile trek across the Rocky Mountains from Durango to Green Mountain Falls Jan. 4.Joining us as our first Green Box Artists in Residence of 2023, the Durango-based bluegrass trio, Stillhouse Junkies has been busy at work in Green Mountain Falls on their next album.This one-of-a-kind trio was born out of the collective passions of three individuals with very different musical backgrounds. Fred Kosa...

GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS • Arriving a day late due to winter weather and road conditions, the Stillhouse Junkies safely made the 300-mile trek across the Rocky Mountains from Durango to Green Mountain Falls Jan. 4.

Joining us as our first Green Box Artists in Residence of 2023, the Durango-based bluegrass trio, Stillhouse Junkies has been busy at work in Green Mountain Falls on their next album.

This one-of-a-kind trio was born out of the collective passions of three individuals with very different musical backgrounds. Fred Kosak, Alissa Wolf and Cody Tinnin share a common goal of bringing sounds and grooves to their fans that fall outside easy genre distinctions.

The band will perform at Ent Center for the Arts at UCCS in Colorado Springs on Friday.

Here’s a Q-and-A about what the band has been up to so far:

Green Box: Welcome to Green Mountain Falls! What are your thoughts on this location being an inspiring place to create new work?

Fred: We’ve driven through this part of the state many times, but we had no idea Green Mountain Falls even existed, so it was a nice surprise to look at it on the on the map. It’s a cool little community. The winter is a slower vibe than the busier summer months, but we’ve been able to go out on the trails, eat at The Pantry and get to know the town a little bit.

Green Box: What has your time here meant to you so far? Have you ever done anything like this before?

Alissa: It’s incredibly unique for us to have the time and space to come together and work on music, specifically new music. As touring musicians we’re on the road so much it’s difficult to have the space and energy to create, especially together. So, it has been phenomenal in that regard. It’s very quiet here and peaceful. The amount of space that Green Box has given us to set our schedule and work on our own has been amazing.

Cody: I’d like to add we were all extremely focused coming into this residency. We had time off beforehand and a chance to recuperate from last summer’s tour. To have no other responsibilities than to just work, having the total freedom every day to create. We’re all having a really good time and we’re very motivated in this space.

Fred: Getting into a daily rhythm is something we wouldn’t be able to do normally. To have this many days in a row, unprogrammed, and to get into the flow of meeting each morning for coffee, playing on our own, then coming together again in the afternoon to see what we’ve worked on … it’s been really special. Your creative juices can follow a schedule much better than having a day here or there. This is really rare for us.

Green Box: How often do you get together to practice?

Cody: Normally, we’re together all the time on tour and practice whenever and wherever we can. Airplanes, hotel rooms, etc. But to have the “free” time, especially for an entire month? It’s definitely one of those once-in-a-lifetime experiences. We’re now trying to figure out if this is something we can do annually, maybe rent a house each January in Florida or something.

Green Box: How many days are you on the road typically?

Cody: We do around 150 shows each year. We’re touring the first couple of weeks of February and March, then we’re on the road April through October. We’ll also be in Germany in this winter for a 30-show tour and we were in Europe last summer as well.

Fred: Usually when we do have time off, we don’t want to play music. It’s a time for us to recharge before we go on tour again. Sure, practicing on the new album is something we could have squeezed in, but to be able to get momentum around the effort, and a continuity from song-to-song because we’re all here together in one place is amazing.

Green Box: Something unique about you all is that you’re from Colorado. You already create in this beautiful place. But here, you are immersed in nature at The Shed, the Artist in Residence space. How has that been?

Alissa: Personally, having my own room to sit in and practice my fiddle has been inspiring. I practice a lot at home, but being in an environment where the sole purpose of being here is to work, I’ve been extra creative. It reminds me of the vibe of going to summer camps when I was young. We have this monthlong period of time where we’re expected to focus only on music. You get in a mindset here, and it’s really encouraging and positive.

Green Box: Tell us about what you’re working on. Is there a certain theme, tone, or purpose for this new album?

Cody: Fred has been working on this new album for a long time. For Alissa and me, there’s been this inside joke, like “yeah, Fred’s got this whole record and we’ve never heard it.” Fred has done a lot of the legwork on this over the years, especially during COVID, so we’ve had this music “in the queue” for a long time. But again, nothing Alissa or I had ever really heard until we arrived here. So, when we got here, obviously we were really excited. This has been a long time coming, and the music is still very raw, but we’ve had more opportunity to co-write together. To get into the arrangements and parts together from the ground floor up.

Fred: I’ve always liked a themed album, where it’s a single artistic statement as opposed to just a collection of other songs someone has at the time. Without giving too much away, our new album is an American story of a musician being “found” by a producer, brought to the city, and dealing with the music business while trying to navigate this new environment and staying true to the music. I wanted to do something “about” making music, which is something we’re all very familiar with at this point. We know the ins-and-outs of the industry. This music is kind of a reflection of our own journey in some ways.

Green Box: When can we expect to hear this new album?

Cody: People have been curious since we’re all out here working together. They’re wondering when new music will be coming out. We just released an album in September called "Small Towns" that we’re really proud of. We won’t release another album until 2024. This time together is essential for when we go into the studio to record in either winter of 2023, or spring of 2024. Timing-wise it’s serendipitous to get this music started now before our next tour season. We have a nice head start, and we can start trickling in new music into our live shows as well. That’s really where we learn what songs are going to be – when we play them live a few hundred times. The audience starts to tell us what they want.

Fred: We drove up here in the evening and immediately started working the next day. We’re at the halfway point and have about six songs completed of a 12-track album. And that’s working every day for two weeks straight. It's a lot of work. We would have found a way to get it done eventually, but it would’ve been challenging and definitely wouldn’t have happened all at once like this. We’ve never worked on an entire album from start to finish, as one continuous thing. It’s perfect with how this residency worked out because the album lends itself to that kind of process for sure.

Green Box: We’re really excited to hear what you guys come up with! Anything else you’d like to add?

Alissa: We’re all so grateful and appreciative for all of this. It’s really unique and special and we’re deeply thankful for the experience.

About Green Box: Green Box was launched in 2009 in Green Mountain Falls and has grown into a year-round incubator of multidisciplinary visual and performing arts. The organization provides residents and visitors from Colorado and around the world the opportunity to participate in the creative arts in the natural beauty that awaits at the foothills of Pikes Peak. Anchored by an annual summer arts festival, Green Box also engages with community year-round through an active Artist-in-Residence program, arts education, and public art installations. More info: greenboxarts.org

New school start and end times announced for D-20 in the Colorado Springs area

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - New school start and end times were announced for D-20 on Tuesday in regard to their 2023-24 school year.The times were finalized by administration on Tuesday. The new times are as follows:The current start times vary from school to school. For the 2022-23 school year, the start and end times are as follows:Elementary schools 2022-23:Middle Schools 2022-23:High Schools 2022-23:Acting upon recommendations from the Academy District 20 (ASD20) School...

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - New school start and end times were announced for D-20 on Tuesday in regard to their 2023-24 school year.

The times were finalized by administration on Tuesday. The new times are as follows:

The current start times vary from school to school. For the 2022-23 school year, the start and end times are as follows:

Elementary schools 2022-23:

Middle Schools 2022-23:

High Schools 2022-23:

Acting upon recommendations from the Academy District 20 (ASD20) School Start/End Times Committee, the district will modify school start/end times for all schools. This change goes into effect at the start of the 2023-24 school year.

The new start/end times follow a three-tier schedule. Currently the district follows a two-tier schedule. By starting/ending each level at its own time, the district will adhere to and follow best practices regarding adolescent sleep time. Additionally, the change creates sustainability for our transportation system and maximizes efficiency.

The proposed new times are as follows:

Please note, the 40 minutes between start times is the minimum time needed for buses to run routes. We understand this is a significant change and presents a variety of challenges to family schedules, work schedules, and before/after school activities. We are therefore exploring strategies to help mitigate the impacts of these challenges. We will share more information about that in the coming days/weeks.

Research Suggests Altering Start Times

This proposal comes after two years of discussion and research by the School Start/End Times Committee – comprised of students, staff, guardians/parents and health care experts. The committee was charged with reviewing, analyzing, and researching school schedules for elementary, middle, high school. The committee worked to:

The committee heard from health care experts and studied numerous research, all of which suggests there are optimal school start times for specific grade levels and adjusting bell schedules creates multiple benefits for students.

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine has called insufficient sleep for teens a public health issue and recommends middle and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m., because it supports overall teen health, alertness and safety.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention says teenagers need eight to 10 hours of sleep per night, but currently almost 60% of middle schoolers and more than 70% of high schoolers don’t get enough sleep on school nights.

A study by the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement at the University of Minnesota showed when school starts later, teens get more sleep, which leads to better physical and mental health, including decreased rates of depression and anxiety and less caffeine and substance abuse.

The National Sleep Foundation found both attendance and graduation rates “significantly improved” in schools that delayed their start times to 8:30 a.m., or later.

The American Educational Research Association shared data from the Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis found earlier school start times do not have the same negative impacts for elementary school students as they do for high school students.

As the committee studied the academic, social and emotional benefits to adjusting start/end times, the group also realized there could be transportation efficiencies and offerings gained through a three-tier system.

Currently, due to the combination of an inefficient delivery schedule as a result of varied start times, and commensurate shortage of bus drivers, we are unable to transport all athletic and activity teams to after school events/competitions, teachers are unable to schedule off-site learning experiences (field trips) for students, after school activity buses are cancelled, and we are even forced to cancel certain bus routes to/from school.

Changing to a three-tier transportation delivery system will allow us to return to a service delivery system that best supports students, specifically it will allow the following.

· Creating adequate bus service in the future, as new neighborhoods and schools are built or boundaries changed.

· Reducing vehicle inventory, shifting fiscal resources to schools.

· Reviewing the afterschool activity bus service and possible expansion of intra-district bus services during the school day in 2024-25.

History

In the spring semester of 2021, Superintendent Tom Gregory charged Dr. Susan Field, Assistant Superintendent of Learning Services and Dr. Jim Smith, Assistant Superintendent of Planning and Engagement with forming a committee to explore three areas related to the district calendar:

To date, we have implemented the recommended changes from the District Calendar Review Task Force (DCRTF) specific to managing snow days, and the recommended PLC dates have been scheduled and will be scheduled into the future. However, the District Calendar Review Task Force recommended the district spend additional time researching the benefits and disadvantages of changing start times, by level.

Members of the subcommittee met eight times during the 2021-2022 school year and reviewed existing research about start times and the potential impact that later start times could have for adolescents. This committee reviewed 16 articles, engaged in conversation with medical experts, and heard from ASD20 staff to further examine the possible benefits and full impact of moving high schools and middle schools to a later start time.

Please visit ASD20.ORGto see information regarding the work of the Start and End Times Committee.

Additionally, you can watch the proposed start/end time presentation from the Jan. 19, 2023, Board of Education meeting. Please visit the Board of Education page on ASD20.ORG, and select Agendas, Minutes & Video. This will take you to BoardDocs, where the videos of our board meetings are housed. From there you can navigate to the Jan. 19, 2023, board meeting and watch the video. (Please note the Start/End Time presentation starts at The presentation begins 58 minutes into the video.

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