MediterraneanGrocery Wholesalers in Boston, MA

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The Largest Selection of Wholesale Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products in Boston

When it comes to trying new, exciting cuisine, few foods hit the spot like a deliciously fresh Mediterranean meal. However, we know that it can be very difficult to find authentic Mediterranean grocery wholesalers in Boston, MA. Having lived in metro Atlanta for years, we realized that our customers needed an easy way to find quality wholesale Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in bulk. That is why we created Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market – to give everyone a chance to enjoy tasty, healthy food, desserts, and authentic Mediterranean gifts at wholesale prices.

Founded in 2009, Nazareth Grocery has become one of Boston’s leading international wholesale grocery stores. We are very proud to serve our customers and do everything in our power to give them the largest selection of high-quality wholesale goods available.

If you’re looking for the freshest, most delicious Middle Eastern wholesale products and ingredients, you will find them here at the best prices in the state. We encourage you to swing by our store in Marietta to see our selection for yourself. We think that you will be impressed!

The Nazareth Difference

At Nazareth Grocery Mediterranean Market, our mission is simple: bring you and your family the largest selection of wholesale Mediterranean products in Boston. When coupled with our helpful, friendly staff and authentic Middle Eastern atmosphere, it’s easy to see why we are the top Middle Eastern grocery wholesaler in Boston, MA. We’re proud to carry just about every kind of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern product that you can think of, from prepared meals and hookahs to fine seasonings and sweets. We’re here for our customers and want each one of them to have a unique, one-of-a-kind experience when they shop with us.

Our loyal customers love our selection of the following wholesale foods and gifts:

  • Fresh Breads
  • OlivesOlives
  • HummusHummus
  • CheesesCheeses
  • SaucesSauces
  • Savory-FoodsSavory Foods
  • DessertsDesserts
  • DrinksDrinks
  • HookahsHookahs
  • TobaccoTobacco
  • SaucesGifts
  • Much More!Much More!

Our Service Areas

Most Popular Wholesale Mediterranean Foods

There is so much more to Mediterranean food than pizza and pasta. The perfect climate combined with delicious foods and amazing wine makes the Mediterranean incredibly irresistible. That’s why our customers absolutely love to buy this kind of cuisine in bulk. Every country in this region has its own set of specialties and delicacies, each with its own flavors and styles of preparation.

Mediterranean countries include:

  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Turkey
  • Syria
  • Egypt
  • Israel
  • Libya
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Spain

So, when it comes to the most popular wholesale Mediterranean products in Boston,
what are we talking about?

Feta Cheese

Feta Cheese

Feta cheese is a classic Mediterranean dairy product that is often enjoyed on its own, in Greek salads, on bread, or mixed with zucchini. Depending on where the feta is sourced and produced, the cheese can be made from cow, sheep, or goat milk, or even a combination of the three. Regardless of the animal it comes from, this delicious cheese is a crowd favorite.

Baba Ganoush

Baba Ganoush

This Levantine dish is one of the most well-known Mediterranean dishes to eat in the United States. It typically comes in the form of a dip, served with pita or another kind of dipping bread. Commonly served before dinner as an appetizer of sorts, it usually features tahini, eggplant, garlic, spices, and sometimes yogurt. This tasty cuisine works great as a spread on a sandwich, or you can even eat it with a spoon, all on its own.

Baklava

Baklava

If you have never tried authentic baklava before, get ready to have your mind blown. This dessert is a traditional Mediterranean food that will have your taste buds craving more and more. Once you open a box of baklava from our Mediterranean grocery wholesaler in Boston, MA, you won’t want to stop eating! Baklava is made with layers of thin filo dough, which is layered together, filled with chopped nuts (think pistachios), and sealed with honey or syrup. Baklava is so good that its origins are debated, leaving many wondering which country invented the dessert. Everyone from the Turks to the Greeks and even Middle Easterners hold unique takes on baklava. Try each one to discover your favorite!

Most Popular Wholesale Middle Eastern Foods

Fresh, healthy, aromatic, rich: it’s no wonder that the popularity of Middle Eastern cuisine and products has skyrocketed in the United States. This genre of cuisine features a large variety of foods, from Halvah to Labneh. If there were one common theme throughout all Middle Eastern food, it would be the bright, vibrant herbs and spices that are used. These flavorings help create rich, complex flavors that foodies fawn over. Typically, Middle Eastern food is piled high for all to eat, with enough food for an entire republic to put down.

Tabbouleh

This refreshing, healthy dish is chock-full of greens, herbs, tomatoes, and bulgur (or cracked wheat), creating a memorable, bold flavor. This dish may be eaten on its own or paired with a shawarma sandwich or helping of falafel. It’s best to buy your ingredients in bulk to make this dish because it tastes best freshly made with family around to enjoy. Just be sure to bring a toothpick to the tabbouleh party – you’re almost certain to have some leafy greens stuck in your teeth after eating.

Shawarma

Shawarma

We mentioned shawarma above, and for good reason – this dish is enjoyed by men and women around the world, and of course, right here in the U.S. Except for falafel, this might be the most popular Middle Eastern food item in history. Shawarma is kind of like a Greek gyro, with slow-roasted meat stuffed in laffa with veggies and sauce. The blend of spices and the smoky meat mix together to create a tangy, meaty flavor that you will want to keep eating for hours. For western-style shawarma, try using beef or chicken. For a more traditional meal, try using lamb from our Middle Eastern grocery distributor in Boston, MA.

Hummus

Hummus

Traditionally used as a dip meant for fresh pita, hummus is a combo of chickpeas, garlic, and tahini, blended together until silky, smooth, and creamy. You can find hummus in just about any appetizer section of a Middle Eastern restaurant menu. That’s because it’s considered a staple of Middle Eastern food that can be enjoyed by itself, as a spread, or with fresh-baked pita bread. Hummus is also very healthy, making it a no-brainer purchase from our grocery store.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

If there’s one diet that is most well-known for its health benefits, it has got to be the Mediterranean diet. In 2019, U.S. News & World Report listed the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 on its best over diet list. This incredible diet has been cited to help with weight loss, brain health, heart health, diabetes prevention, and cancer prevention.

Whether you already love Mediterranean food or you’re looking to make some positive changes in your life, this “diet” is for you. Eating cuisine like Greek food, Persian food, Turkish food, and Italian food is healthy and tastes great. Even better than that? At Nazareth Wholesale Grocery, we have many staples of the Mediterranean diet for sale in bulk so that you can stock up on your favorites at the best prices around.

So, what exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

It is a way of eating that incorporates traditional Greek, Italian, and other Mediterranean cultures’ foods. These foods are often plant-based and make up the foundation of the diet, along with olive oil. Fish, seafood, dairy, and poultry are also included in moderation. Red meat and sweets are only eaten in moderation, not in abundance. Mediterranean food includes many forms of nuts, fruits, vegetables, fish, seeds, and more. Of course, you can find at them all at our wholesale Mediterranean grocery store!

Here are just a few of the many benefits of eating a healthy Mediterranean diet:

Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Reduced Risk
of Heart Disease

Many studies have been conducted on this diet, many of which report that Mediterranean food is excellent for your heart. Some of the most promising evidence comes from a randomized clinical trial published in 2013. For about five years, researchers followed 7,000 men and women around the country of Spain. These people had type 2 diabetes or were at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants in the study who ate an unrestricted Mediterranean diet with nuts and extra-virgin olive oil were shown to have a 30% lower risk of heart events.

Reduced Risk of Stroke for Women

Reduced Risk
of Stroke for Women

In addition to the heart-healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet, studies have shown that eating healthy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern foods can reduce the chances of stroke in women. The study was conducted in the U.K., which included women between the ages of 40 and 77. Women who stuck to the Mediterranean diet showed a lower risk of having a stroke – especially women who were at high risk of having one.

Benefits of Eating a Mediterranean Diet

First and foremost, purchase your Mediterranean and Middle Eastern wholesale foods from Nazareth Grocery – we’re always updating our inventory! Getting started on this healthy, delicious diet is easy.

Try these tips:

Try these tips

1.

Instead of unhealthy sweets like candy and ice cream, try eating fresh fruit instead. It’s refreshing, tasty, and often packed with great vitamins and nutrients.

2.

Try eating fish twice a week, in lieu of red meat. Fish is much healthier and doesn’t have the unfortunate side effects of red meat, like inflammation.

3.

Try planning out your meals using beans, whole grains, and veggies. Don’t start with meats and sweets.

4.

They’re tasty, but try to avoid processed foods completely.

5.

Instead of using butter to flavor your food, use extra virgin olive oil instead. Olive oil contains healthy fats and tastes great too.

6.

Try to get more exercise and get out of the house. The Mediterranean lifestyle is an active one, best enjoyed in the beautiful sunshine when possible.

Why Buy Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Products Wholesale?

Buying wholesale and retail are quite different. When you buy products from a wholesaler, you’re essentially buying from the middleman between a retail establishment and the manufacturer. Wholesale purchases are almost always made in bulk. Because of that, buyers pay a discounted price. That’s great for normal buyers and great for business owners, who can sell those products to profit. This higher price is called the retail price, and it is what traditional customers pay when they enter a retail store.

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Latest News in Boston

Town of Brookline implements COVID-19 vaccine requirement similar to Boston's

BROOKLINE, Mass. —A Massachusetts town that is a suburb of Boston is following the city's lead when it comes to requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination for a variety of indoor businesses and venues.The town of Brookline is implementing a COVID-19 vaccine requirement that begins with a soft rollout on Saturday and takes full effect on Jan. 22....

BROOKLINE, Mass. —

A Massachusetts town that is a suburb of Boston is following the city's lead when it comes to requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination for a variety of indoor businesses and venues.

The town of Brookline is implementing a COVID-19 vaccine requirement that begins with a soft rollout on Saturday and takes full effect on Jan. 22.

The Brookline mandate requires that proof of vaccination be provided by patrons of the following businesses and venues:

Starting Saturday, Jan. 15, all patrons ages 12 and up will be required to present proof that they have received at least one dose in either a one-dose or multi-dose COVID-19 vaccination series. Violators of this policy will face fines of $300 per violation starting Jan. 22.

On Feb. 22, all patrons 12 and up will be required to present proof of both doses of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Patrons ages 5 to 11 will be required to present proof of at least one dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, which is the only vaccine currently authorized for the age group, starting March 22. Those patrons will then be required to prove they received a second dose of that vaccine by May 1.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu announced a similar proof of COVID-19 vaccination policy last month. Brookline borders six of Boston's neighborhoods: Brighton, Allston, Fenway–Kenmore, Mission Hill, Jamaica Plain and West Roxbury.

"By implementing this regulation, Brookline is doing its part to mitigate a continuing surge that is stretching our health care system to its limits, because vaccination is proven to severely limit the potential for hospitalization due to COVID-19," Brookline Interim Health Commissioner Pat Maloney said in a statement.

Brookline's COVID-19 vaccine requirement does not affect public or private K-12 schools, child care programs, senior centers, community centers or noncommercial municipal functions. It also does not apply to sites that are not open to the general public.

Those entering the indoor establishments covered under the Brookline mandate for a quick, limited purpose — such as using the restroom, placing or picking up a takeout order, making a delivery or performing necessary repairs — will be exempt from the vaccine requirement. Public safety, public health and emergency services personnel will also be exempt.

Patrons of the Brookline businesses covered under the COVID-19 vaccine requirement can provide proof of vaccination in a number of ways, including:

On Monday, Gov. Charlie Baker announced a digital vaccine card system that people who were vaccinated in Massachusetts may obtain and save on their smartphones.

Boston Public Schools district to resume athletic activities next week after COVID-19-related pause

BOSTON —Athletic activities in the Boston Public Schools district are set to resume next week following a COVID-19-related pause that lasted through the holiday break.BPS Senior Director of Athletics Avery Esdaile announced Wednesday that the district will begin holding sports practices on Jan. 18, the day after Martin Luther King Jr. Day. She also said the school district is tentatively planning to resume competitions on Jan. 24 if the current COVID-19 surge improves.The decision to resume athleti...

BOSTON —

Athletic activities in the Boston Public Schools district are set to resume next week following a COVID-19-related pause that lasted through the holiday break.

BPS Senior Director of Athletics Avery Esdaile announced Wednesday that the district will begin holding sports practices on Jan. 18, the day after Martin Luther King Jr. Day. She also said the school district is tentatively planning to resume competitions on Jan. 24 if the current COVID-19 surge improves.

The decision to resume athletics activities was made in consultation with the Boston Public Health Commission and after a thorough review of recent data, according to Esdaile.

"Next week's activities should focus on both reacclimating/conditioning and re-establishing healthy team habits (mask wearing, sanitation and weekly testing) that will be vital to a successful remainder of the season," Esdaile said in a statement shared with BPS winter sports coaches, athletic coordinators and school leaders.

Esdaile said student-athletes are required to participate in weekly COVID-19 testing at school and must meet those testing requirements in order to be able to participate in athletics for the remainder of the winter season.

Boston Public Schools first announced a pause on all athletic competitions and practices on Christmas Eve. That pause was initially set to remain in effect through at least the end of Monday, Jan. 10.

In addition, the Framingham Public Schools district announced Wednesday that the city's pause on extracurricular activities and community group activities, which was initially supposed to last two weeks, will be lifted after just one week at 9 a.m. Friday.

In a statement, Framingham Superintendent Bob Tremblay said that the COVID-19-related pause was being lifted a week early because alternative measures that support a safe return to group activities in all city buildings, including schools, have been developed over the last week.

The pause went into effect at 2 p.m. on Jan. 7 in response to a dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases across the city. Wednesday's decision to curtail the pause was made during a meeting between Tremblay, Mayor Charlie Sisitsky and the Framingham Department of Public Health.

"We understand that the pause had been a source of concern and distress for some residents, students and families. In order to restart and continue these activities, all participants must follow new safety measures and behave responsibly," Tremblay said in his statement.

Between Wednesday and Friday morning, Tremblay said activity organizers will be communicating new COVID-19 protocols to their participants.

‘It’s exhausting’: Nurses at Boston hospital frustrated by lack of testing, masks

BOSTON (WHDH) - As COVID-19 cases climb and swamp local hospitals, nurses at Brigham and Women’s Hospital say their health and safety are being put at risk.“There are so many things that are giving us anxiety right now,” said registered nurse Sarah Bessuille.Bessuille said the hospital has been allowing patients up to two visitors a day and requires them to wear masks, but it is up to the nurses to enforce mask-wearing.“When the patient’s family or friends and visitors do come up, they are o...

BOSTON (WHDH) - As COVID-19 cases climb and swamp local hospitals, nurses at Brigham and Women’s Hospital say their health and safety are being put at risk.

“There are so many things that are giving us anxiety right now,” said registered nurse Sarah Bessuille.

Bessuille said the hospital has been allowing patients up to two visitors a day and requires them to wear masks, but it is up to the nurses to enforce mask-wearing.

“When the patient’s family or friends and visitors do come up, they are often not wearing their masks in the rooms,” she explained.

A spokesperson for the hospital said visitors will be limited to one per day starting on Wednesday. In the last month, visitor restrictions have gone into effect at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, Boston Medical Center, Tufts Medical Center and South Shore Hospital.

The hospital spokesperson said they have increased testing capacity by 44 percent in the last three weeks, but Bessuille said even that is not enough for nurses who are constantly treating infected patients.

“We’ve asked the hospital to open up more testing for at least the direct caregivers, the people who have to come within six feet of patients,” Bessuille said, “and all we’ve been told is there are no plans to open more testing for us.”

The Massachusetts Nurses Association said nearly 700 Brigham employees have tested positive for COVID-19 this week alone.

Bessuille said that the nurses who are still healthy are worried they will not have enough masks to prevent infection.

“When you do have the N95s on the floor, it’s a constant battle trying to get enough of them. You’re constantly calling materials management saying, ‘We need another box of this, we need another box of that,'” Bessuille said.

In a statement, Brigham and Women’s Hospital said, “Our supply chain teams have secured contracts for N95s and we continue to receive shipments. Even with these efforts, we need to proactively take steps to preserve our supply, given high usage of N95s.”

Bessuille said that after spending the first two waves of the pandemic on a floor that only cared for COVID-19 positive patients, she hopes hospital management will work with the nurses as the highly-contagious omicron variant spreads.

“They are still not listening,” she said. “It’s exhausting to continue to have to fight for what we know is the right thing.”

(Copyright (c) 2022 Sunbeam Television. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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How Fast Is COVID Surging in Boston? This Chart Shows the Spike After Christmas

Wastewater has been used as a metric to track COVID in the Boston area since the start of the pandemic, using bits of genetic material collected in sewage to indicate how much of the virus is circulating in the community.The latest update from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority's tracking system, on Thursday, shows a massive spike after the Christmas holiday -- from lev...

Wastewater has been used as a metric to track COVID in the Boston area since the start of the pandemic, using bits of genetic material collected in sewage to indicate how much of the virus is circulating in the community.

The latest update from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority's tracking system, on Thursday, shows a massive spike after the Christmas holiday -- from levels that were already at record highs.

As of Thursday, when data was available through Dec. 28, COVID levels were averaging about 6,000 RNA copies of COVID per milliliter, with the most recent tests above 10,000.

When the data was last available, six days earlier on Nov. 22, the average was at 2,500 RNA copies of COVID per milliliter, with the most recent samples under 6,000.

Here's that data in one animated chart to show the change:

The levels of COVID have begun to dwarf those of previous surges, while the scale of the chart's Y axis (at left) nearly triples in less than a week to be able to show it.

It's no surprise that COVID is spiking in the Boston area -- city and state data have been showing the same thing, and Wednesday's COVID case total for Massachusetts shattered the record set the previous week.

That data comes from molecular tests reported to the state, also known as PCR tests. At-home tests aren't taken into account in the state's data, and proponents of wastewater COVID detection have argued that it helps give a fuller sense of the virus' spread in a community, also including people who don't take tests at all.

We got an up-close explanation of how one Massachusetts company, Biobot Analytics, has been analyzing wastewater to monitor for coronavirus spikes in the Boston area and around the country.

The data for Boston is collected from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority's Deer Island wastewater treatment plant and analyzed by Cambridge-based Biobot Analytics three to seven times a week.

Forty-three communities from eastern Massachusetts have their water treated at the plant, including Boston, Cambridge, Framingham and Quincy. The data cannot be linked to specific cities, towns or neighborhoods.

Other areas monitor wastewater for COVID as well -- Burlington, Vermont, detected the omicron variant in its wastewater this month before the first case was officially confirmed by the Vermont Department of Public Health.

Snowfall In Massachusetts This Weekend Could Follow Record Warmth

BOSTON (CBS) — 60 degrees one day, snow the next? That sounds about right!December thus far has been a dud for snow lovers.Ski areas are struggling to open or stay open, and backyard rinks look more like swimming pools.By the end of this week, temperatures will be averaging more than five degrees above the average per day, likely making the month a top ten warmest on record to date.Dreams of a White Christmas are fading, but don’t give up hope!Colder weather is on the way, and we will likely hav...

BOSTON (CBS) — 60 degrees one day, snow the next? That sounds about right!

December thus far has been a dud for snow lovers.

Ski areas are struggling to open or stay open, and backyard rinks look more like swimming pools.

By the end of this week, temperatures will be averaging more than five degrees above the average per day, likely making the month a top ten warmest on record to date.

Dreams of a White Christmas are fading, but don’t give up hope!

Colder weather is on the way, and we will likely have several chances at snow before Santa makes his trek south. And it starts this weekend!

Before we get there, we have one more significant warmup.

Temperatures on both Thursday and Friday will likely hit or surpass 60 degrees in parts of southern New England. Record-high temperatures are certainly possible on either day (Boston’s current records: 64 degrees on both days).

We have already hit 60 in Boston four times this month, and 10 times since the start of November, but this COULD be the last time we see 60 for a while, likely until sometime next year.

We are pretty confident that a colder, more “typical” December stretch is likely for the last couple weeks of 2021. But snowfall is a bit less certain.

While some storms may be shunted completely south of New England, others may take a more classic “La Nina” track, splitting our area with a mix of rain and snow, kind of like what we expect this weekend.

While it is still several days away, we feel fairly confident in some aspects of the potential weekend storm:

If you are planning on traveling or perhaps doing some holiday shopping this weekend, the most likely time for highest impact would be late Saturday afternoon through very early Sunday. Again, we will refine the timing as we get closer, but for now, plan out the best travel times being the first half of Saturday and second half of Sunday.

Way too early to talk snowfall amounts, but figure something on the scale of 1-3” or 3-6” in areas northwest of Boston (how far northwest remains to be seen).

Closer to the city and to the south and east there is a greater likelihood of mixed precipitation or rain. Should the precipitation shield reach as far north as the Mountains, it would certainly be snow up there, and they sure can use it!

We will continue to monitor and update the forecast the rest of this week. Stay tuned to WBZ-TV, CBSBoston.com and CBSN Boston for all the details.

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